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Full text of "St. Mary's Muse"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/stmarysmuse19061907sain 



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June, 1906 






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139 



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The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 

Vol. XI. June, 1906. No. 1. 

'Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam, 
Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home; 
A charm from the sky seems to hallow us there, 
Which, seek through the A\ T orld, is ne'er met with elsewhere — 

Home, Home, Sweet, Sweet Home! 
There's no place like Home! 
There's no place like Home! 



The Commencement Sermon. 



"Be ye therefore perfect." — St. Matt. v. 28. 

(Leading thoughts; from the sermon to the graduates, preached in St. Mary's 
Chapel by Rev. R. W. Hogue, Rector of St. James' Church, Wilmington, Sunday 
morning, May 27, 1906.) 



Remember, in your unavoidable duty and your exceptional oppor- 
tunity to perfect yourselves, the serious importance of the choosing of 
your companionships. Keep these companionships free from any com- 
promise with your dignity and your purpose, untainted by the subtle 
and false fascination of a popularity that is won at the cost of duty and 
sometimes of character. And remember, too, in thinking of companion- 
ships, that the choice of books and the lasting influence of books must 
not be forgotten. 



Find your powers, train them, trust in them ; yes, but also know your 
weaknesses, curb them, hold them, conquer them. Bear in mind the two 
great definitions of genius and hold them as your daily motto : "Genius 
is one-tenth genius and nine-tenths labor." "Genius is the capacity 
for hard work." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Do not despise the discipline of daily self-mastery. It is not excep- 
tional gifts and unused talents that count in this world or in the eyes of 
God, so much as the simple, steady, certain, brave, living life. The 
prodigal is abnormal. It is the heroism of daily goodness, the conse- 
crated trained pluck and perseverance that shall lead us to see every 
obstacle become a glorious evidence of God's love and confidence in us, 
all the more glorious as it seems .the harder. 



The spirit of independence entering womankind has made many 
changes in the old order of things, bringing with it curses and dangers 
as well as blessings. Woman has come to the most promising stage in 
her history, the stage when she is to "find herself" more perfectly and 
understand her true mission better. 

A woman should have, must have, a purpose. I would have you real- 
ize what a blessing it will be if you have some definite purpose in life 
and do not merely play at life, as so many do. 

A word to parents. Give your daughter something to do and see that 
she does it well. Thoroughness is a word the meaning of which we 
people of the Southland especially must needs learn better. 



In a far subtler and deeper sense than man, a true woman, wherever 
she is found, may be an inspiration to all that come in touch with her. 
Filled with prosaic cares and details as the life of a woman is, she can 
only accomplish this by "choosing the better part" and deliberately 
cleaving to that choice in spite of all. 

One thing must be a fixed and essential part of woman's daily life 
above all else. She may not always put down her immediate and press- 
inff duties in her home to minister to the spiritual wants of others, but 
there is something she can always do, and that is — to pray. 

The more we see of the needs and sins and sorrows of life, the clearer 
becomes the truth that the crying need of the Christian world is the 
knowledge of prayer. 

Whatever you leave undone, remember, you daughters, you sisters, 
you mothers, that a great part of the salvation of the world rests in your 
prayers. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



We know full well that at no moment of our earthly lives can we 
present a perfect self to God. But is that reason why we shall not 
strive for perfection and live toward it? Is it not the chief glory of 
this great Christian faith of ours that, unlike the old religions, it has a 
perfect ideal, which forever urges onward and upward, which has no 
place for the complacency or the conceit of easy attainment, which makes 
of death itself hut the opening into an eternity that is life ? 

Shall we be half-hearted in our service, timid in our hopes, or satisfied 
with self? Shall we not pledge ourselves afresh to work, to pray, to 
live a fuller, deeper, more perfect Christian life ? 



II Padre Curato. 



SERENA C. BAILEY. 

(The prize story, hitherto unpublished, for which in connection with her other 
contributions, Miss Bailey was awarded the Muse prize at Commencement. ) 



It was a hot day, even for September, and the city streets seemed 
almost stifling. Horses tugged wearily along, or worn out sank in their 
shafts. Half -clothed children gathered near the fire-engine houses 
until the kind-hearted firemen turned streams of water upon drooping 
horses and dancing children alike. Men and women hastening to or 
from work complained of the heat, and to some of them came the vision 
of shady farm-yards or sheltered brooks — perhaps the memories of 
childhood or only the ideas gathered from the Sunday papers. Among 
the thousands who were obliged to remain in the city and toil on without 
rest, many were suddenly stricken down and hastily carried to the 
hospitals. 

For one of these people, there had been an opportunity for a short 
vacation in the country, but to this man duty called with a clearer voice 
than did self-indulgence. To-day the priest felt the heat as never be- 
fore, and sometimes there almost crept in the thought that perhaps he 
was wrong not to have left town for a few days. But when he remem- 
bered his parishioners' need for him, he became ashamed of even the 
thought of such selfishness. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



Still this morning was a hard one, and as he went home for his often- 
postponed dinner, the peculiar ache in his head seemed to grow rapidly 
worse. Well, never mind, he would soon reach the house and perhaps 
he could rest a little while. Rest,— rest, on the sofa in the dark study ; 
there would be no one to disturb him there. He began thinking of his 
recent visit to Magdalina, who forever quarreling with Antonio, her 
husband, as usual had poured out her woes to the "little father." How 
different was their life from his, so peaceful, so free from worldly 
troubles ! How wise the Church had been in forcing celibacy upon her 
clergy ! He had nearly reached the house, when suddenly he seemed no 
longer able to bear the intense pain, and sank unconscious to the ground 
- — only another victim to the sun. 

For a few days he lay unconscious in a cool hospital room. At times 
he struggled to leave his bed, to go back to his people, his people, his 
people, he kept repeating. The calm, elderly nurse often entered with 
flowers or fruit, bags of grapes or pears that had been brought by ragged 
children or tearful men or women for "II Padre Curato" or "Padre 

Paolo." 

Within a week he was given another nurse ; the first one having been 
called home by illness in her family. A quiet, slender girl took her 
place. Being an enthusiastic person in whatever she undertook, she 
immediately became interested in the priest's case; and spared no effort 
in nursing him. Hour after hour she stayed by him, trying to give 
him every possible relief. 

He was still out of his head, but one afternoon he had become quieter, 
and she had been resting and reading by the open window. The book 
was a short life of Luther, a character whom she ardently admired. 
She had been reading for some time, when all at once she seemed unable 
to fix her mind upon the book, and she glanced up to see the quiet, sane 
eyes of her patient resting upon her. When she went quickly to his 
side, he smiled weakly, and managed to say, "What have you been read- 
ing ? " "A life of ," she started to answer, then suddenly stopped. 

o * ? J 

He seemed expectant, and in her confusion, she said, "Luther." The 
priest turned his face away. Luther, the heretic, the brilliant, the 
gifted heretic ! What a glory to the Church his life might have been, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



but instead — oh, the pity of it ! The sick man's thoughts turned to one 
point in Luther's life, a part that had always seemed irreconcilable 
with the undoubted nobility of the man ; how had the former monk, the 
one-time observer of the slightest monastic rule, been able to justify 
marriage with a woman, who like himself, was once and forever bound 
by the strictest vows ? 

After Paul's return to consciousness, he became gradually stronger. 
He often slept, or midway between sleeping and waking, half-dreamt, 
half-thought. His thoughts were generally with his parishioners, yet 
often did they return to one theme, Luther. Sometimes the sick man 
talked to his nurse, but generally only when it was necessary. As his 
strength increased and his mind became more active, he was glad when 
she was in the room, and lonely when he awoke and did not see her. 
Her gentle manner soothed him, and sometimes when she read to him, 
he wished that he could hear that voice forever. Unconsciously, he 
liked to watch her noiseless, graceful movements and look at her face. 
The brown eyes were dark and shadowy like brooks in the woods, or like 
the eyes of Italian peasants, he thought. O, it was a long time since 
he had been in Italy, dear Italy ! He was only seventeen when he 
came to America, his mother and father having died a few months be- 
fore. Somehow, he recalled his childhood very vividly now; the pic- 
turesque little village; the old priest that had taught him; the dear 
parents, who had been his only companions save the village children. 
But then he had been different from those children ; he remembered now 
how he had longed for a sister or a little friend, and in those far-off 
days he had pictured how he wanted her to look. ISTow he wondered if 
Evangeline was not his ideal, grown and perfected. When he spoke to 
her of his native country, she listened eagerly, breathlessly, and he was 
happy that it interested her. But sometimes he tried not to talk to her, 
not to look at her, for was he — was he learning to love this woman ? He 
almost shuddered at the thought. Often he tried to be stern or to be 
utterly indifferent to her presence, but when she spoke, or looked at him 
with her sweet, childish little smile, he felt that his efforts were in vain. 

And she ? How often did she look at him when he lay unconscious or 
asleep. His face was noble and spiritual ; yet, sometimes, perhaps when 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



he was dreaming, there crept arormd his mouth a smile, just a fleeting 
little thing, and she fancied that perhaps he was thinking of something 
beautiful, perhaps of his childhood. She wondered if he had always 
been so good — for she knew he was that — all that saw him felt that they 
were in the presence of one of God's elect; a true and lofty, but a 
healthy-minded, sympathetic man. Every line of that face told her of 
self-denial, self -conquest. Yet, the mouth betrayed the secret of a 
lurking humor that nothing could entirely suppress. 

At first she told herself that she was only studying that face ; human 
nature always interested her, and when she: had the time, she often 
imagined the life stories of her patients. But this one, this man, no 
one had interested her as he had done. 

When he sat up for the first time, she was as happy as he was ; per- 
haps she knew how much of his recovery was due to her untiring care. 
It was early fall, now ; and out-of-doors, Paul could see the wind shaking 
the bare branches of the trees. The day was just cold enough for a fire. 
Paul could imagine how his beloved study looked : the book-lined walls, 
the grate with its flickering fire. How many, many times he had sat 
by the fire, dreaming, dreaming, and yet never lonely, but always ab- 
sorbed in the troubles and interests of his people. But now that he was 
soon to go back — oh, he tried not to think of it. 

A few weeks later he was well enough to leave the hospital. A car- 
riage was to come for him at noon. All that morning he had tried to 
seem happy at going, and Evangeline made a like attempt, but both 
failed miserably. When twelve o'clock came, he bade her good-bye, in- 
differently, almost coldly. Just now, however, for no apparent reason, 
his strength seemed suddenly to leave him, and his nurse hastened 
away for a stimulant. When she returned she found him with his head 
buried in his hands. As he heard her light step, he looked up, trying to 
recover his composure. "I am glad you came, I — I — ." "You don't 
feel as well, perhaps you had better not go until later ?" "No, I must 
go." A shadow passed over his face. "I may never feel more like it 
than now." She turned hastily, for she was afraid to meet his eyes. 
When she went with him to the carriage, she fancied — perhaps it was 
only a fancy — that when he said good-bye, he added softly, "My Evan- 
geline." 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



When he reached the house he found the old housekeeper awaiting 
him. She was hovering between tears and smiles, and indecision 
whether to hobble down to the carriage, or to try to be dignified and 
restrain her delight. The pallor of his face frightened her, but when 
she caught, the familiar twinkle in his sunken eyes, the good old soul was 
reassured. 

After he slowly made his way into the house and hastily seated him- 
self in his study chair, he bade her leave him ; he needed nothing, he 
told her. Unwillingly and protestingly she obeyed. For a long while 
he sat there, alone — alone. Sometimes, when he closed his eyes, he 
fancied that he heard a light footstep 1 , and thought himself back in the 
hospital. He turned his burning Lead from side to side, and longed 
for the cool, soothing touch of Evangeline's hand. And then he would 
remember that he should not be thinking of such things, was he not 
obliged to keep the vows that he had voluntarily taken ? Why had he 
sought these bonds ? Why could he not be happy with the happiness 
of other people ? Ah, after all, was his life so blessed ? Could it not 
be more useful were he aided and encouraged by a noble companion ? 

In the days to come, he was always seeking an answer to this question ; 
his heart gave him one answer ; his conscience, trained by his teaching, 
gave him a very different one. Footsteps, soft voices, haunted him, 
but at times he fancied that another Voice condemned him. 

For Evangeline, after he had gone, her regular duties were very 
monotonous. Always, though she struggled against it, her mind could 
picture only his face; her heart cry out for him. Each, day dragged 
slowly by ; the world had become an unbearable place. Sometimes, when 
off duty, she went out to walk and scanned the faces of the passers-by, 
hoping and yet afraid, to see that one face. Was there to be no relief 
from that loneliness, this struggle between her love and her desire to 
crush; it ? This unceasing warfare lasted day after day, and only occu- 
pation, although often a burden, kept it from striking deeper into her 
soul. 

Often she thought of his home, as he had described it to her. She 
could see him sitting in the study, perhaps talking to some poor or sick 
person. In his modest way, he had told her how they came to him, his 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



people. They must have missed him terribly, she thought. If she 
were only there she could help him with his duties ; how she would love 
to care for the many unfortunates that found their way to him. 

It was in this mood that one afternoon she decided to go to Vespers at 
his church. It would be dark there, she knew, and she could slip in 
unobserved. He must not, must not, see her. 

When she reached the church, the service had not begun and she 
quickly sought a corner in the dimly-lighted building. 

When he came in, she was startled by his face, always ascetic, but now 
marked by sorrow and struggle. She eagerly watched him, listened to 
his soft, full voice. Why, why had she ever seen him— and yet, what a 
privilege to have known him ! 

Praying, she sat there after he and the few others in the church had 
left. Suddenly she became conscious of the low tones of the organ. 
On, on, the music flowed ; she had never heard music like it. She lifted 
her bowed head, but although she could not see who was playing, her 
heart told her that it could be but one person. Each tone echoed her 
own feeling ; the love, the fiery struggle of her own soul. In her excite- 
ment she could hardly restrain herself from flying to him and sobbing 
out her overwhelming love. But gradually the music changed. Self 
was being conquered. The strains rose, unhesitating, exalted, trium- 
phant, and told her that for him the worst was over. The music be- 
' came softer,' fainter, sweeter. Evangeline, praying that like strength 
would be given her, left him, not alone, but with God. 



The Commencement of 1906. 



With its closing days marked by at least two events of much more 
than usual interest, and yet the Commencement in itself differing little 
from the Commencements of former years, on the last day of May 
another school session came to a close and the sixty-fourth session of 
St. Mary's was a matter of record, to be judged chiefly in the future 
lives of those who had part in it. 

The death of Miss Saunders, coming as it did at the height of the 
Commencement season, seemed rather to bring the true seriousness of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



life to the minds of all than to cast a gloom over the scene. The sweet 
service in which the last respect was paid by the friends who had known, 
loved and honored her at St. Mary's was wholly appropriate and just 
as she would have had it. And the scene, in place and yet out of place, 
real and yet unreal, will linger long in the minds' and hearts of all 
those who were at St. Mary's at this Commencement of 1906. 

The welcome announcement after the annual meeting of the Trustees 
that the St. Mary's corporation, for the first time since St. Mary's became 
a corporation, was entirely free from debt — though the announcement 
was made quietly and unofficially and so perhaps escaped the notice of 
some especially interested — is the most significant evidence of material 
progress that has been vouchsafed since St. Mary's became the property 
of the Church. 

These two events mark out the recent Commencement from those 
which have been and those which shall be. But the Commencement 
itself will long be remembered also for the things which belonged 
more entirely to it. The Commencement Sermon in which Mr. Hogue 
won a place in the affections of St. Mary's girls that was but strength- 
ened in the days of his visit ; the excellent art exhibit ; the very credit- 
able presentation of "The Man in the Case" by the Elocution Depart- 
ment ; the unique class-day exercises with the placing of the first class- 
stone to have position in the Grove ; the Rector's reception to the gradu- 
ating class; the more than usually well received annual concert of the 
Music Department; and finally the graduation exercises distinguished 
by the excellently put valedictory and the announcement of the Honor 
Roll in the parlor, and the final devotional exercises in the Chapel, with 
Mr. Witsell's presentation of the HSTiles Medal and Bishop Strange's 
inspiring charge to the graduates ; each will be long remembered. 

Some extracts from the sermon are given in this Muse, and as the 
School will publish it entire there is no need of comment here. But 
the printed sermon cannot be all that the spoken one was to his congre- 
gation as it listened to the earnest words of the preacher and felt the 
sweetness of his presence. Mr. Hogue came to St. Mary's a stranger to 
nearly all but the Wilmington girls, his parishioners, who never grow 
tired of sounding his praises, but at the close of his visit each girl felt 
she had made a dear friend. 



10 The St. Mart's Muse. 



THE ART EXHIBIT. 

One of the most noteworthy of the features of the Commencement was 
the exhibit of the Art Department, which was open to the public, as 
usual, Monday afternoon and Wednesday night, and to the Alumnae 
Tuesday afternoon. The department has been unusually large the past 
session, but the display would presumably have been less effective, inas- 
much as Miss Tenner had but one advanced pupil, the others being prac- 
tically beginners. But the interest in the new kinds of stencihwork, 
appealing both to beginners and more advanced pupils, led to the prep- 
aration of much of this work and the effect was remarkable. Dainty 
window curtains, table covers, sofa pillows, showing at once original 
design and its application, lent a new feature to the display, while the 
painting in oil and water-color, the charcoal drawing, etc., while not as 
abundant as usual, was quite up to the standard. 

THE ELOCUTION RECITAL. 

Miss Cribbs had chosen as the program for tbe annual recital of her 
department the rendition of the three^act comedy, "The Man in the 
Case " The cast was not large, but proved a strong one; the play was 
well-chosen and blissfully free from male characters; and the rendition 
generally pronounced to have been, as it should have been, the best 
dramatic production of the year. 

This was the cast : 

Mrs. Montressor— A would-be member of "the 400" of Boston, 

Marguerite Ashley Short 

Enid Montressor, her daughter Emily Jordan Carrison 

Madame Boguski-A Theosophist of the Inner Cult Rowena Lee 

Gladys Gadabout— A Radeliffe Senior Laura Baker 

Aline O'Rourke— An Irish Maid pretending French Helen Strange 

Ruby Norris 

Acts I and II— Scene in Mrs. Montressor's Home. 
Act III— Gladys' Room at Radeliffe. 

THE CLASS-DAY EXEECISES. 

The weather for the Commencement could hardly have been better, 
and this meant especially much for the Class-Day Exercises in the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

Grove. At ten o'clock the throng had gathered on the lawn near the tree 
which was thereafter to be the especial charge of the girls of 1906, oppo- 
site the tree of their sisters of 1905, and promptly at half-past ten came 
the class, with Miss Thomas, the Honorary Member, bearing a huge 
daisy chain in solemn procession to the raised dais which had been pre- 
pared. There the President and Secretary took their seats with their 
class-mates grouped about them, and the exercises were opened with the 
familiar strains of "Carolina." 

The visitors were welcomed and the alumnae greeted by Bettie Woolf, 
the class President, in a neat speech; and then Annie Sloan, the Pro- 
phet, read the Class Prophecy. The prophecy as well as the poem are 
preserved in the annual Muse. Jane Iredell Green then delivered the 
Last Will and Testament of the Class (to be found elsewhere in this 
issue of the Muse). At the conclusion of the will, the class gathered 
around the tree and affixing the dark blue and old gold, their class colors, 
made it their own. Margaret Mackay, Class Poet, read the poem, and 
Bettie Woolf said the adieu in presenting the key of Senior Hall to 
the representatives of the Junior Class. 

Here the exercises were turned over to the Class of 1905, who, with 
four of its members, Margaret DuBose, Florence Grant, Bessie Poe 
Law and Mossie Long, present, and Miss Katie, Honorary Member, 
placed their class stone, inscribed with the 1905 motto, Fac et Spera, to 
the singing of Auld Lang Syne. 

And then, with all joining heartily in the strains of Alma Mater, the 
day was done. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ALUMNAE. 

The regular annual meeting of the Alumnae is held regularly at half- 
past four of Tuesday in Commencement Week in the Studio, and the 
attendance this year was large, but the critical condition of Miss Saun- 
ders, so well known to all and the close friend of the directing officers, 
threw a damper over the meeting and only the absolutely necessary 
business was transacted. The old officers were re-elected as follows : 

President — Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Vice-Presidents— Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham; Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, 
Kaleigh; Mrs. P. P. Tucker, Kaleigh; Mrs. Kate de E. Meares, Wil- 
mington. 

Secretarij-Treasu rer— Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

THE RECTOR'S RECEPTION. 

Tuesday evening, despite the universal sorrow, the regular reception 
was held as usual, though without the presence of guests from without 
This is peculiarly a school function. The Rector and Mrs. DuBose, 
with the Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, and the members of the graduating 
class, received the guests, who included the Trustees, the Faculty and 
the pupils with their visiting relatives. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING OE THE TRUSTEES. 

There was an excellent attendance of the Trustees at the annual meet- 
ing, which is held in the Library on the afternoon of the Wednesday 
of Commencement Week. 

Eev. Mr. Hogue, of Wilmington, and Mr. Geo. C. Royall, of Golds- 
boro, the new Trustees from East Carolina, took their seats at this 

meeting. 

The News and Observer gave this general account of the meeting: 

The Board of Trustees of St. Mary's held a most harmonious meeting, and the 
splendid condition of the institution and its bright prospects for increased usefulness 
was a subject of congratulation. 

Matters of business and plans for the future were discussed at length, these 
being entered into with enthusiasm, for the reports showed that St. Mary's School 
is entirely out of debt and that its field of usefulness is widening. 

The Trustees decided to build and equip a steam laundry for the institution, to 
overhaul the steam heating plant, and to make other permanent improvements 

as needed. 

The report of the work of the year was received, and this the Trustees declared 
to be the most satisfactory in the history of St. Mary's. This is a splendid tribute 
to Eev. McNeely DuBose, the rector, who has striven to put St. Mary's on a high 
plane, and to make it an institution worthy of the fine patronage it is receiving, 
and shows that the school is flourishing as never before, and has the brightest 
prospects. 

The Trustees found that the Eliza Pittman Memorial Auditorium is in process 
of construction and announce that it will be completed in time for the next com- 
mencement, thus giving larger quarters for the annual commencement exercises of 
the school. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



The meeting yesterday was presided over by Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, 
while Dr. Kemp P. Battle, Jr., is the Secretary and Treasurer. In addition to 
these there were present the following members of the Board: Bishop Junius M. 
Horner, of Asheville; Bishop Robert Strange, of Wilmington; Rev. Julian E. Ingle, 
of Henderson; Rev. T. C. Wetmore, of Arden; Rev. Robert B. Drane, of Edenton; 
Rev. W. P. Witsell, of Columbia, S. C; Rev. Richard W. Hogue, of Wilmington; 
Rev. M. M. Marshall, of Raleigh; Mr. D. Y. Cooper, of Henderson; Mr. William E. 
Erwin, of West Durham; Mr. J. H. Hayne, of Greenville, S. C; Mr. Frank Wood, 
of Edenton; Mr. G. C. Royall, of Goldsboro; Messrs. Richard H. Battle and C. E. 
Johnson, of Raleigh. 

THE ANNUAL CONCERT. 

The annual concert of the Music Department, the greatest drawing- 
card of the Commencement, was again greeted this year with an out- 
pouring of people too numerous for the accommodations. The need of 
the new Auditorium was made very apparent. 

This was the last concert under the direction of Mr. Sanborn, who has 
so faithfully guided the interests of the department for the past four 
years, and was an artistic triumph for him and his teachers, Mrs. San- 
born, Mrs. Irvine, and Misses Dowd, Hull, Pixley and Sanborn. 

The orchestral numbers and the songs were especially appreciated. 

This was the program : 

Melody in F Rubinstein 

St. Mary's Orchestra 

Barcarolle Godard 

Caroline Nelson DeRosset 

The Lass with the Delicate Air Arne 

Margaret Eldridge 

Murmuring Zephyrs Jenson 

Myrtle Louise Disosway 

Terzet, Nursery Rhyme Suite Custance 

Misses Fisher, Eldridge and Barnwell 

Allegro Appassionate Saint Saens 

Frankie Leonore Self 

All for You d'Hardelot 

Desdemona Creighton 

Valse de Concert Liebling 

Serena Cobia Bailey 

Judith, scena and aria Concone 

Ruth Foster 



14: The St. Maby's Muse. 



Ballade and Polonaise, for Violin and Piano Vieuxtemps 

Gertrude Elaine Sanborn 
Miss Pixley at the Piano 

Carnival Scenes in Vienna Schumann 

Laura Baker 

Quartet, The Parting Kiss Pinsuti 

Misses Fisher, Eldridge, Brigman and Barnwell 

Venetian Love Song, from a "Day in Venice" Nevin 

St. Mary's Orchestra 

When Love is King Buck 

Marylily Fisher 

Scherzo and Coral DuBois 

Virginia Empie Bailey 

Hungarian Dance Isenman 

St. Mary's Orchestra 

To again quote: 

The annual concert given last night was a really brilliant and enjoyable one, and 
was a tribute to the effective management of the Department of Music by Professor 
Sanborn, who has shown" splendid talent and executive ability, a teacher who has 
taught thoroughly and earnestly. 

There was present a splendid audience that filled and overflowed the parlor, and 
yet could not be accommodated, a matter that will be overcome next year as the 
new auditorium will give room that is greatly needed. The parlor was tastily 
decorated for the exercises last night. 

The first number was a Rubinstein selection, his "Melody in F" being rendered 
charmingly by St. Mary's Orchestra of sixteen pieces, in this being violins, viola, 
violincello, double bass, clarionets, trombones and cornets. The rendition was greatly 
enjoyed. It was followed by Godard's '-Barcarolle," a piano selection, excellently 
given by Miss Caroline Nelson DeRosset, of Wilmington, after it coming a vocal 
selection, Arne's 'The Lass With the Delicate Air," rendered by Miss Margaret 
Eldridge, of Camden, S. C, who has a very sweet and attractive mezzo-soprano voice. 

The next number was by Miss Myrtle Louise Disosway, of New Bern, whose piano 
selection was the "Murmuring Zephyrs" of Jenson, this light and rippling piece 
being splendidly given. After it was a jolly trio, the "Terzet, Nursery Rhyme 
Suite" of Custance, this serio-comic selection being cleverly sung by Miss Marylily 
Fisher, of Edgefield, S. C, soprano, Miss Margaret Eldridge, of Camden, S. C, mezzo- 
soprano, and Miss Emma Barnwell, of Sumter, S. C, alto. Next was a piano 
number, Saint Saens' "Allegro Appassionate," this most difficult and beautiful 
selection being splendidly given by Miss Frankie Lenore Self, of Hickory. Miss 
Desdemona Creighton, of Raleigh, then sang charmingly the song by d'Hardelot, 
"All for You," her sweet and round soprano being greatly enjoyed. 

Liebling's "Valse de Concert" wasi next exquisitely played by Miss Serena Cobia 
Bailey, of Palatka Fla., and following this Miss Ruth Foster, of Brunswick, Ga., 
sang delightfully the scena and aria from "Judith," by Concone, her soprano voice 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



being beautiful, smooth and flexible. Then came a violin selection by Miss Gertrude 
Elaine Sanborn, of Buena Vista, Va., the piano accompaniment being by Miss 
Pixley. This was Vieuxtemps' -Ballade and Polonaise," for violin and piano, and 
it was delightfully given. 

The illness of Miss Laura Baker, of Georgia, prevented her rendition of Schumann's 
"Carnival Scenes in Vienna," and the next number was a .piartet, "The Parting 
Kiss," by Pinsute; in this Misses Fisher, soprano, Eldvidge, mezzo-soprano, Barn- 
well, second alto, and Miss Mattie Brigman, of Rockingham, first alto, singing 
splendidly. St. Mary's Orchestra next delightfully rendered Nevin's Venetian Love 
Song, from "A Day in Venice," after which Miss Marylily Fisher, of Edgefield, 
soprano, sung with excellent effect Buck's "When Love is King." Miss Virginia 
Empie Bailey, of Wilmington, next rendered in a splendid style Du Bois' "Scherzo 
and Choral," the light and sportive music being brilliantly given. The genuinely 
enjoyable concert closed with the ever delightful "Hungarian Dance" of Isenman, 
brilliantly rendered by St. Mary's Orchestra. 

THE GRADUATION EXERCISES. 

Thursday morning came the climax. 

There is a charm all its own about the Commencement at St, Mary's, this be- 
ginning with the exercises in the parlor, continuing in the ever attractive proces- 
sional of sweet maidens all in white through the grounds to the Chapel and the 
delivering of the diplomas by the Bishop. Once seen these are never forgotten, and 
always the memory is a pleasant one. 

The exercises 1 began at half after ten o'clock in the parlor, beautifully decorated 
and filled with friends. On the rostrum were the graduates, the Rector, members 
of the clergy and of the Board of Trustees. The historic parlor was used this year 
for the last time, as next year the exercises will take place in the Elizabeth Pitt- 
man Memorial Auditorium, now being constructed, and the greater room will give 
place for larger audiences, as many have been kept away from Commencement 
events by the limitations of space for visitors. 

The opening number of the program was Weber's "Invitation to the Dance," a 
piano selection cleverly rendered by Miss Sadiebelle McGwigan, of Enfield. This 
was followed by the salutatory by Miss Annie Elizabeth Koonce, of Richlands, who 
in a charming little address made welcome all to the events of the day. Following 
this Miss Louise Hill, of Lexington, charmingly rendered a piano selection, 
"Spring," by Liszt. 

The class essay was read by Miss Annie Whitner Sloan, of Columbia, S. C, this 
being a sketch of the life and poems of William Wordsworth, poet and philosopher, 
an essay which gave evidence of a high degree of literary culture and felicity of 
expression. A lovely vocal quartet, Barnby's "Sweet and Low," was next sun<* 
by Misses Fisher of Edgefield, Eldridge of Camden, Foster of Georgia, and Barnwell 
of Sumter. 

The concluding event of the exercises in the parlor was the valedictory, deliv- 
ered by Miss Frances Elizabeth Woolf, of Demopolis, Ala. This was a charming 
parting address, brief, business like, and yet full of the sadness of saying "good- 
bye." 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Rev McNeeley DuBose, the Rector, next read the list of honor students and the 
r oU o'f dLions, follows which the audience adjourned to the chape the 
beautiful processional of the students all in white bemg *^£gLFZZ 
-Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand," the procession enteied the Chapel, where 
dlotional exercises were conducted by Bishop Joseph Blount (Mure. Then 
came the presentation of diplomas and certificates, the certificates bemg delivered 
by the Rector and the diplomas by Bishop Cheshire, who presented Bishop Robert 
Strang of Wilmington, to deliver the address to the graduates. Prayer and the 
b nedfetion by Bishop Strange closed the Commencement exercises and L the > students 
left the Chapel, singing as the recessional hymn -Jerusalem, High Tower. 

THE CHARLES M. XILES MEDAL. 

The Niles Medal, first offered by Dr. Niles at the last Commencement, i« awarded 
to that pupil of the College Department who has shown herself throughout the ses- 
*irm most excellent in scholarship and deportment. 

The first a-rd of the medal was made to Miss Lillian Hauser Farmer, of 
Elo Ice S C of the Junior Class, average being 97.86 per cent, and her deportment 
p r ect Li presenting this medal, which was done before the diplomas were pre- 
inted, Rev. W. P. Witsell, of Columbia, S. C, spoke most pleasantly of the splen- 
did record of Miss Farmer. 

Dr Mies is now on leave of absence in Europe, for his health, and so 
was unable to be present, but announces that the medal will be con- 

timied - THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 

waves of the sea divided fox Israel to p«ss ov r .^ ^ 

-go forward," so the graduates must e^e 1 go forward 

real life of strength, safety and *^ ^^ effort for the bet terment of 
He urged that they go forward by work ,^eal usetul formance of some 

!SS ^?Z%1^~~^ develop L glittering crow. 

that would constitute the real joy of life. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 17 



The Class Honors. 



THE SALUTATORY ANNIE E. KOONCE. 

A commencement, like a day, has its morning, noon and evening — in 
other words, it has its welcome, its exercises, and its farewell. My 
message is that one which we most gladly give, the word of welcome. 

So, in behalf of the Class of Nineteen-Six, I extend a cordial and a 
heartfelt welcome to all who may favor ns with their presence during 
this occasion, so interesting to us. First, to the fathers and mothers 
whose thoughts and affections have, for all these years, been centered 
upon this spot, I extend in behalf of their daughters a joyous welcome. 

To our beloved Rector, who has so ably conducted the affairs of this 
institution ; to the teachers who have faithfully and patiently taught us ; 
to the Board of Trustees, who, by their foresight and wisdom, have 
made it possible for so many of the daughters of other States as well as 
the "Old North State" to enjoy such educational advantages as are to be 
found here; to the clergy and to our loved bishops in particular, I 
extend with a grateful heart a most cordial welcome. 

To the Junior Class, only a little younger than we, who a year hence 
will stand where we now stand, and experience what we are to-day 
experiencing — in behalf of the class I represent — I give a sisterly wel- 
come. 

To the student body, to each and all, it gives me pleasure to extend a 
loving and hearty welcome. 

Dear friends, you honor us by your presence on this our day. May 
our exercises be as pleasant to you as is your presence to us. 

Welcome ! Thrice welcome, all ! 

THE VALEDICTORY FRANCES E. WOOLF. 

To me has fallen the scarce enviable privilege of bidding you fare- 
well. I will not even attempt to express my feelings or the feelings of 
my class, — 

"for -words are only words and move 
Upon the topmost froth of thought." 

and those tears which spring unbidden to my eyes, — they speak more 
eloquently for us. 



lg The St. Mary's Muse. 



At this moment of parting everything at this dear old St. Marys 
seems to us to have grown doubly dear : the little room, now bared of its 
pictures and pennants-the Grove-the Chapel-and you, my dear 

friends. •, 

You have been drawn so much nearer to us that we cannot say good- 
bye but wishing that each of you may find much happiness in the years 
to come-1906 bids yon an revoir-and "may God be with you till we 

meet again." 

The Class Essay. 



AJsNIE whitner sloan- 



Wordsworth, the Poet. 

I wandered lonely, as a cloud 

That floats on high o'er vales and hills, 
When all at once I saw a crowd, 

A host of golden daffodils 
Beside the lake, beneath the trees, 
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. 

Continuous as the stars that shine 

And twinkle on the milky way, 
They stretched in never ending line 

Along the margin of the bay; 
Ten thousand saw I at a glance 

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. 

The waves beside them danced, but they 

Outdid the sparkling waves in glee; 
A poet could not but be gay 

In such a jocund company; 
I gazed and gazed and little thought 
What wealth the show to me had brought. 

Beneath the trees of Gowbarrow Park near the water, the greatest of 
the Lake Poets walking one day with his sister saw the dancing daffodils, 
and the sight of that golden belt enriched our literature. 

We fancy seeing them now, as the brother and sister did then, some 
resting their heads upon the mossy stones, as for weariness, and the 
others tossing and reeling and dancing and seeming as if they verily 
laughed with the wind that blew upon them over the lake. How gay 
they look ! Ever changing, ever glancing ! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 

It was in this Lake Country at Cocke rmouth. near Gowbarrow Park, 
where the daffodils danced under the trees, and near many other spots 
which he has immortalized, that William Wordsworth, the poet and the 
philosopher, was born, April 17, 1770. 

Wordsworth probably received little of his poetical genius by inherit- 
ance. His mother died when he was eight, but it is said that even at this 
early age she divined something of his character. She said William 
was the only one of the children whose future life she was worried 
about, because she knew it would be remarkable, either for good or for 
evil. His sister Dorothy and his life-long friend, Coleridge, seem to 
have had a great deal of influence on him. Wordsworth writes in 1832 
in speaking of Coleridge, "He and my beloved sister are the two beings 
to whom my intellect is most indebted." But it was nature, which he 
loved with the first passion of youth, and which had a most lasting 
influence on the immortal poet's mind. Wordsworth himself in a few 
words sums up the influence that his environments had on him. "Akin 
to the vapors exhaling from the lakes," he says, "are the fleecy clouds 
resting upon the hill-tops ; they are not easily managed in picture with 
their accompaniment of blue sky, but how glorious are they in nature, 
how pregnant with imagination to the poet! And the height of the 
Cumbrian Mountains is sufficient to exhibit daily and hourly instances 
of those mysterious attachments. But such clouds lifting up suddenly 
their glittering heads from behind rocky barriers and hurrying out of 
sight with speed of the sharpest edge, will often tempt an inhabitant to 
congratulate himself on belonging to a country of mists and clouds and 
storms, and make him think of the blank sky of Egypt, and of the ceru- 
lean vacancy of Italy, as an unanimated and even a sad spectacle." 

Scotland, Wales, Switzerland, Germany and Italy have all a place in 
his works, but the scenes of Wordsworth's childhood left behind them 
the deepest impressions, and we find him, perhaps too often, longing 
for "the tender grace of a day that is dead." 

"My early school-days," he tells us, "were very happy ones." When 
nine years old he and his brother John went to Hawkshead to school. 
Here he made his first verses, but they were forced upon him, and, not 
springing from that boundless imagination which he afterwards devel- 
oped, were nothing worth. 



20 The St. Mart's Muse. 



In 1787 he went to St. John's College, Cambridge, from where 
"with laurels all unbestowed" he took his degree in 1791. But it was 
here with the influence of the groves of forest trees around him, especi- 
ally that of one exquisite ash tree wreathed with ivy, under which he 
used to love to linger long, that the first thoughts of poetry began to 
dawn upon him. He, who of all English poets, in spite of his defects, 
could pierce the furthest behind the veil, was even now, silently and 
unconsciously, beginning to peep through the shadowy mists, and to 
learn from the nature around him what he himself afterwards so faith- 
fully taught. 

The first part of his poems were devoted entirely to nature, as an 
example, the "Descriptive Sketches:" Then, later in life, when his 
mind became broadened with his travels, he wrote of "men as they are 
men within themselves." For another great influence on Wordsworth 
was the French Revolution, his hope for what it would accomplish, and 
his disappointment when he saw the excesses of the Terror and the 
Imperialism of Napoleon. So he turned away from it with a complete 
relaxation of his whole mind, every fibre of his being vibrating with a 
feeling of pity or disgust. He had no admiration for a man like the 
great Napoleon, for he was then looking for the sympathy between man 
and man and his chief praise was to be bestowed upon the "Cumberland 
mountaineer." 

A few years later at White Moss, in the sweet garden orchard so 
eminently fair, Wordsworth composed his best works; the second vol- 
ume of Lyrical Ballads, parts of "The Prelude" and "Excursion," and 
"The Ode on the Intimations of the Immortality of the Soul." The 
last great ode is the best of his longer poems, and probably it has been 
criticized more than any of the rest of them. The reason it is not 
universally popular is that it opens up for us a new field of thought 
never before explored, and some people do not readily grasp new ideas ; 
but think of the excellences of the poem, in which Wordsworth portrays 
the most characteristic of his poetical doctrines and also reaches the 
height of his imaginative powers. 

His greatest literary work was accomplished from 1798-1808. In 
1843, after the death of Southey, Wordsworth was made Poet Laureate, 



The St. Mart's Muse. 21 

but he was never from the first as popular as he deserved to be — 
"Strongest minds are often those which the noisy world hears least." 

From this review of the influences moulding the poet's mind, let us 
turn to a consideration of his rank among poets. 

According to the judicious criticism of Matthew Arnold, with whom 
many agree, England has the right, if any country has, to be proud of 
her poets, and Wordsworth is one of the greatest. If we take the roll of 
our chief poetical names besides Shakespeare and Milton, we find that 
Wordsworth ranks above Spencer, Pope, Coleridge, Burns, Byron and 
Shelley. 

Looking at the great names on the continent after the death of 
Milere, Schiller, Heine, Leopardi, Racine, and Victor Hugo, we find 
that with the single exception of Goethe, Wordsworth's name stands 
first. This is indeed a great claim to be made for him, but it is true. 

Having seen how Wordsworth ranks as a poet, we must consider the 
characteristics that give him this place in literature. There were de- 
fects in his poetry too obvious to be overlooked, yet they almost vanish 
away when we think of the good his work has done. His style was 
sometimes inconstancy itself, yet we cannot help being pleased with its 
originality, its strong feeling, its purity; his treatment of details was 
often very minute and his insertion of accidental circumstances perhaps 
unnecessary to make one fully understand his characters, yet we love his 
personality and admire his fertility of mind; his subject® to some 
critics were not great enough for his thoughts, yet this is not by any 
means always true, for Coleridge gives as one of Wordsworth's greatest 
excellences his balance of thought and expression. Few poets have 
approached him in the power of presenting in most felicitous language 
exquisite descriptions of the sights and scenes of the outdoor world. 

Again, his poetry stands with that of Milton because like that of the 
great Puritan poet his life was itself a noble poem, and as he wrote 
poetry because he could not suppress his feelings, you cannot read a 
single verse, hardly a single line, without knowing the poet's character, 
his uprightness, his integrity, his simplicity, his purity, his sincerity, 
his piety. 

These were the elements so mixed in him that nature might stand up 
and say to all not only "This was a man," but also "This was a poet !" 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Southey says, "I never saw poetry so philosophical and so heroic." 
Why philosophical ? Because Wordsworth's poetry and his philosophy 
are inseparable. Like Shakespeare, Milton or Burns, he reveals his 
whole mode of feeling in a few words. Think of the depths of thought 
he displays in this one line, "To me the meanest flower that blows, gives 
thoughts that lie too deep for tears." And it is as the revealer of that 
influence which all that is grand and beautiful in nature has upon man's 
thought and action that Wordsworth stands as the original poet of the 
nineteenth century literature. 

In Wordsworth's vocabulary there was no such word as failure. He 
tells us if a man fail, let him not give up, but let him find some new 
tract to explore. Therefore he appeals to those older in years, who have 
learned from bitter experience, and who turn to him for comfort. He 
was once heard to remark, "Every great poet is a teacher ; I wish either 
to be considered as a teacher or as nothing." Separate the poet and his 
purpose and all is lost. 

"That were indeed a genuine birth, 
Of poesy; 
A bursting forth 
Of genius from the dust! 
What Horace would have glory to behold, 
What Maro would have loved, shall we enfold? 
Can haughty time be just?" 

A thousand times yes. There does not remain in our mind a shadow 
of a doubt that some day, some time, William Wordsworth will be 
recognized as the true genius that he is, and "What he hath loved, you 
will love : and he will teach you how." 



The Class Will. 



JANE IREDELL GREEN. 

We, the Seniors of '06, being of sane mind and sound body, do pro- 
claim all wills heretofore enacted by us to be invalid and make this our 
last will and testament. 

It e m: — We give, devise, and bequeath unto the frivolous Junior 
Class our weighty dignity and wonderful wisdom. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



To the future inhabitants of Senior Hall we will all the valuable 
property contained therein, including rats and The Pistol, which may be 
of aid in case of serenades, but always should be shot into the air. 

It is our will that the doors and windows shall be carefully locked 
every night and all articles of furniture be always carefully examined 
(for they may contain a burglar). It would be excellent while going 
through these nightly exercises to be well armed either with a ponderous 
club or a shoe, and it would perhaps be vase for all lights to be put out 
promptly. Midnight feasts or serenades should not be indulged in. It 
is a great source of worry that we cannot leave to our successors our 
trustworthy "Boog" — but she, with us, will pass away. 

We hereby warn the Class of 1907 to have box couches in their rooms, 
and if they haven't one already, let them buy from us who are about to 
pass away (for couches are very convenient to throw trash into when 
you hear the soft footfalls of the daily inspector). 

Item :- — We give, devise, and bequeath also to the Juniors the privi- 
lege and great pleasure of going clown town unchaperoned. But we 
warn and advise that they should always wear their dignity as a safe- 
guard against flippant young boys, and beware of thinking that the 
privilege of going to Giersch's is conferred upon them, for they will soon 
find out their mistake. We speak from bitter experience. 

Item : — To the Producers of the Annual Muse and Manufacturers of 
the Monthly we do devise and bequeath troubles and cares innumerable, 
but advise them not to be discouraged when Mr. Cruikshank makes the 
statement that they will never be able to accomplish their purpose and 
are the worst class that ever existed in this or any other school, for, re- 
markable, to say, he told us the same thing — and gaze upon our triumphs 
now! 

Item : — We do bequeath to the Faculty the privilege of using us free 
of charge as an example to the school, feeling sure that this will prove 
a great incentive to spur them on to higher things. 

Item: — We would devise and bequeath our numerous mashes, but 
we cannot possibly part with them, as their service is too valuable. 

To Emily Garrison, we do give, devise, and bequeath Ret's beautiful 
suit of hair. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



To Lillian Farmer we will Gertrude's most valuable Wake Forest 
suitor. 

And we do leave to be equally divided between Helen Strange and 
Isabel Clark Annie Koonce's quiet and unassuming ways. 

To Miss Thomas we devise our Senior English, books (as it is impossi- 
ble to sell them at Williams'). 

And last to each teacher and fellow student we will our most sincere 
sympathy and best wishes for many happy and prosperous years. 



Commencement Awards, 1906. 



Diplomas. 
THE COLLEGE CLASS OF 1906. 

Ruth Foster St. Simon's Mills, Ga. 

Jane Iredell Green Wilmington 

Annie Eliza Koonce Richlands 

Mary Thornton Lassiter Hertford 

Margaret Devereux Mackay Raleigh 

Harriett Elizabeth Ruff Ridgeway, S. C. 

Annie Whitner Sloan Columbia, S. C. 

Sara Gertrude Sullivan Savannah, Ga. 

Frances Elizabeth Woolf Demopolis, Ala. 

THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Ruth Batchelder Beaufort, S. 0. 

Caroline Nelson deRosset Wilmington 

Almeria Giles Swann Sanford 

Certificates. 

THE COLLEGE. 

Certificate-Diploma in the English Course. 

Josephine Engelhard Boylan Raleigh 

Myrtle Louise Disosway New Bern 

Eula Hite Gregory Henderson 

Nancy Fairley Rockingham 

Mary Memucan Perry Henderson 

Leonore Wheat Seay Charlotte 

Certificates. 

Virginia Empie Bailey ■ English and Literature 

Martha Brigman English and Literature 



The St. Maky's Muse. 25 



THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

Serena Cobia Bailey Piano 

Virginia Empie Bailey Piano 

Caroline Nelson deRosset Piano 

Myrtle Louise Disosway Piano 

Ruth Foster Vocal 

May Lee Montague Vocal 

THE ART SCHOOL. 

Leonore Wheat Seay Drawing and Water Color 

THE ELOCUTION SCHOOL. 

Rowena Lee Expression 

THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Katharine Talbot Gary Bookkeeping and Typewriting 

Mary Christine Klingensmith . . . Stenography and Typewriting 
Mary Hull McKimmon Stenography and Typewriting 

The Honor Roll of 1906. 
The Honor Roll, the highest public award of merit for the 
pupil of St. Mary's, is based on five requirements. 

In order to be entitled to place on the roll a pupil must— 

(1) Have been in attendance during the entire session and 
have been absent from no duty at any time during the ses- 
sion without the full consent of the Rector, and with lawful 
excuse. 

(2) Have had during the year a course of at least fifteen 
hours of regular work, and carried this work to successful 
completion, taking all required examinations. 

(3) Have maintained an average of "Very Good" (90 per 
cent) or better in all her studies. 

(4) Have made "a record of "Excellent" in deportment. 

(5) Have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing in all 
the affairs of her school life during the year. 

These pupils are entitled to places on the Honor Roll for 
the session of 1905-'06. 

Serena Cobia Bailey Palatka, Fla. 

Sallie Haywood Battle, '09 Rocky Mount 

Heber Corinne Birdsong, '07 Raleigh 

Beatrice Bollman Cohen, '07 Florence, S. C. 

Grace Trueman Deaton, '09 Raleigh 

Myrtle Louise Disosway New Bern 

Maude Marshall Eberhardt, '11 Raleigh 

Lillian Hauser Farmer, '07 Florence, S. C. 

Ruth Foster, '06 St. Simon's Mills, Ga. 

Jane Iredell Green, '06 Wilmington 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Georgia Stanton Hales, '09 Wilson 

Bertha Gladys Harris, '09 Raleigh 

Louise Hill, '08 Lexington 

Bertha Belo Holman, '08 Raleigh 

Evelyn Hyman Jackson, '11 Raleigh 

Annie Eliza Koonce, '06 Richlands 

Eleanor Vass Mann, '11 Raleigh 

Julia Louise Mclntyre, '09 Mullins, S. C. 

Frances Johnson McRee Richmond, Va. 

Katharine Wilder Rogers, '11 Raleigh 

Leonore Wheat Seay Charlotte 

Mary James Spruill, '07 Littleton 

Amelia Whitaker, '10 Raleigh 

Mamie Agnes Wilder, '10 Raleigh 

Frances Elizabeth Woolf, '06 Demopolis, Ga. 

Distinguished in Scholarship, 1906. 

"To be distinguished in scholarship a pupil must have main- 
tained at least a minimum course in the academic department; 
must have been 'Excellent' in deportment; and have an aver- 
age of 95 per cent or more in her studies." 

Pr. a. 

1. Lillian Hauser Fanner, '07 97.86 

2. Maude Marshall Eberhardt, '11 97.03 

3. Georgia Stanton Hales, '09 96.56 

4. Serena Cobia Bailey 96.54 

5. Elizabeth Turner Wad-dill, '08 96.36 

6. Julia Louise Mclntyre, '09 96.19 

7. 'Myrtle Louise Disosway 96.16 

8. Mary Thornton Lassiter, '06 96.07 

9. Mary Mitchell Chamberlain, '11 95.98 

10. Sadiebelle McGwigan, '08 95.48 

11. Mary James Spruill, '07 95.00 

Primary Department H° nors - 

Honor Roll — Florence Douglas Stone. 

For Progress in the Studies of the Department — Florence 
Douglas Stone. 

For Regular Attendance — Rainsford DuBose. 

For Deportment — Elizabeth Hughes, Florence Stone, St. 
Pierre DuBose. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



Commencement Notes. 



Senah Critz and Susan Bynuni stopped with us on their way home 
from their year in Washington schools. 

Bessie Poe Law, '05, finished her year's work at Waverly Mills in 
time to be at Commencement, and is now spending July at Morehead. 

The Marshals at Commencement were: Chief, in white and gold 
regalia, Miss Virginia Empie Bailey, of Wilmington, of the Sigma 
Lambda Literary Society. Assistants, in blue and silver regalias — 
Misses Josephine Boylan, of Raleigh, and Christine Ivlingensmith, of 
Blairsville, Pa., from the Sigma Lambda Literary Society; Misses 
Emma Barnwell, of Sumter, S. C, and Lottie Sharp, of Edenton, 
from the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society. They were quite equal to 
the occasion. 

There were more than the usual number of Commencement visitors 
from a distance present with us this year, most of them especially inter- 
ested in some member of the graduating class. Among others there 
were Bishop' and Mrs. Strange, Mrs. Wm. H. Green, Mrs, H. B. Short, 
Mrs. R. C. Sloan, Miss Adelaide Meares, Misses Florence Grant and 
Helen Clark, Theo. Cantwell, Mr. Ed. Bailey, of Wilmington ; Col. and 
Mrs. John T. Sloan, of Columbia ; Rev. and Mrs. W. P. Witsell ; Mr. 
Jas. Sullivan, of Savannah ; Mr. J. R, Foster and Miss Catharine Fos- 
ter, of St. Simon's Mills, Ga. ; Miss Harriet Bowen, of Jackson ; Mr. P. 
T. Hayne, of Greenville, S. C. ; Mrs. Koonce, of Richlands ; Mrs, Mark 
Disosway, of ISTew Bern ; Misses Isabel and Sarah Ruff, of Ridgeway, 
S. C. ; Rita Meares, Mary Graves, of Chapel Hill ; Senah Critz, of Win- 
ston ; Susan Bynum, of Lincolnton ; Mossie Long, of Rockingham ; Olive 
Morrill, of Snow Hill ; Mary Villepigue, of Camden ; Leah Perry, of 
Henderson. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. baleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL. 



With this issue the third year of the revived Muse begins. There 
has been little change in the appearance or content of the publication 
since the June, 1904, number appeared, nor is any great change con- 
templated. The Muse then and now is meant solely and simply as the 
school newspaper, to preserve the remembrance of anything worth re- 
membering in the happenings of the school, and to keep the "old girls" 
and others in touch with each other and with the present state of the 
school. The editors will always gladly welcome any suggestions for 
improvement and kindly criticism, and invite the comment of those 
interested in the Muse. 

Though on account of her prolonged illness beginning in the fall, 
Miss Anne Saunders was far less well known to the new girls of the past 
year than to the pupils of St. Mary's during the twelve years preced- 
ing, she made her impression on all. Occupying a distinct place, 
herself a distinct individual, overflowing with interest in girls and in 
St. Mary's, ever mindful of the best traditions of the South, "Miss 
Anne" made herself felt in both the school and the hearts of those 
who knew her. Others, not a few, have given of themselves freely for 
the upbuilding and advancement of St, Mary's, and for one reason or 
another passed out of the school world to other fields while their services 
to St. Mary's have been more or less overlooked, though their work yet 
lives in its fruits, but "Miss Anne" and her place will not be forgotten, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



and while she rests at the close of a long and useful life, her friends, 
the girls of St. Mary's not the least of them, will think of her and 
cherish her memory. The suggestion, coming from older friends, of 
marking that part of the Chapel where she always sat, when she came, 
as she loved to do, to worship there, by placing a window to her memory, 
seems particularly appropriate, for no one loved the Chapel and the 
Church more deeply than Miss Saunders, nor found more joy in its ser- 
vices, and the last time she was able to leave the house, during a brief 
period of improvement a month before the end, she used the little 
energy she had left in going for the last time to the Chapel. And there 
near her favorite seat the memorial of her will be placed. 

The Muse Prizes. 



The Muse prizes, offered at the beginning of the year, were awarded 
on Commencement Day. These prizes, three annual Muses, were of- 
fered as recognition for the best story, the best verses, and the best 
sketch submitted for publication in the Muse during the year. 

The committee appointed to make the awards decided that they shall 

be given to 

Serena Cobia Bailey Palatka, Fla. 

Helen Katharine Liddell i Charlotte. 

Helen Strange Wilmington. 

and said further : 

"The award is made to Miss Bailey for her story, 'II Padre Curato' 
(first published in this number), and her poem, 'Leonore' ; to Miss Lid- 
dell for her poem, 'The Legend of the Diamond and the Pearl,' and 
her sketch, 'The Black Walnut Stairway' ; and to Miss Strange for her 
sketches, 'From a Serenader's Point of View' and 'Arranged Under 
Difficulties' (the latter done in collaboration with Miss Sue Brent 
Prince)." 

The Muse congratulates the winners and will continue the prizes 
another vear. 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Our New Teachers. 



When school opens in the fall there will be opportunities for new 
friendships with teachers as well as girls. Six new faces will greet us 
in place of others we have known well. We present here a very brief 
sketch of the professional lives of these new friends, and leave their 
personalities to speak for themselves. We bid each and all welcome, and 
assure each of our hearty co-operation and loyal support, 

Mr. Almon W. Vincent, who is the new Director of Music, was edu- 
cated in this country and abroad, completing his training at the Koyal 
Conservatory at Leipzig. For seven years he taught at the Cincinnati 
College of Music, and was then Director at Mt, Allison Conservatory, 
Canada, for three years. More recently he has been Director of Music 
at the National Park Seminary, Washington, and Kee Mar Conserva- 
tory, Maryland. He comes to St. Mary's from Westminster College, 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Vincent is a superior concert pianist and organist, 
experienced in orchestral conducting and has been more than ordinarily 
successful as a teacher and director throughout his experience. 

Mrs. Vincent, who will be head vocal teacher, has occupied similar 
positions for many years in the schools in which Mr. Vincent has been 
director. She studied with the best teachers in Cincinnati, Boston, 
New York and Paris. She has a strong dramatic soprano voice of 
excellent quality and range. As a teacher and voice-builder she has had 
great success, which we hope may be continued at St. Mary's. Mr. and 
Mrs. Vincent have no children. 

Miss Eliza Pool, of whom the Muse spoke in May, long a friend of 
St. Mary's and more or less closely associated with it, is too well known 
as a teacher to need introduction. She made a special study of French 
and German for years at the Sauveur and the Portland Schools of 
Languages, and studied at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, and 
at the Sorbonne, Paris. During her long teaching career she has been 
repeatedly abroad for study and has in every way kept in complete 
touch with the best methods. She is at present in Paris for the summer 
for study in preparation for her fall work. Miss Pool will have charge 
of the French at St, Mary's, and will also act as assistant to the Kector, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 

relieving Mr. DuBose of many of the routine duties which he has here- 
tofore managed. 

Miss Ada B. Smith, of Ravenswood, West Virginia, who will have 
charge of the mathematics, is a graduate of 1904 of the Randolph- 
Macon Woman's College. She specialized in mathematics there, and 
has the past two years been teaching very successfully in The Misses 
Thomas' School, Memphis, Tenn. 

Miss Sara Spurlock, late of Nashville, will have charge of the work 
in science and assist in German. She was educated in the University of 
Cincinnati and the Peabody Normal College, completing her study with 
two years special work in science and German at the University of 
Berlin. She has had an extended teaching experience and has during 
the past few years been teaching in Potter College, Bowling Green, Ky. 

Miss Mary E. Spann, who takes the place vacated by Miss Meares, 
and will confine her attention to the lower preparatory classes, has made 
a specialty of this work and has been fitted for it by many years experi- 
ence in Baily Springs Seminary, Huntsville College, and other Southern 
schools, though she has been teaching the past sessions in the Hender- 
sonville and Asheville city schools. She was educated at the Peabody 
Normal College and in Canada. She is especially interested in Lanier 
and his writings, and her presence at St, Mary's, in addition to her 
teaching, will doubtless prove very helpful to the Sigma Lambda Liter- 
ary Society. 



SCHOOL NOTES. 



— Though work on the Pittman Memorial Building progresses slowly, 
it is pleasant to see it go steadily on. There is little prospect of the 
Auditorium being ready for use until late in the next school year, but 
the foundation is now about ready and work will be pushed as rapidly 
as is possible. 

— The girls seem all to have gotten home safely and to be enjoying the 
vacation too thoroughly to vouchsafe the Muse much information. No 
news is good news usually, and we hope this is true in this instance, both 
collectively and individually. 



32 The St. Mart's Muse. 

— The laundry, discussed for several years, is this summer to become 
a fact. It will be located in a specially prepared building to the north 
of the Art Building, and the installation of the laundry plant will be a 
distinct move forward in the work of improving the equipment of St. 
Mary's. During the summer a large part of the steam heating apparatus 
will also be thoroughly overhauled and renewed. 

— The Worth Carolina Diocesan Council met in Henderson the middle 
of June. Mr. DuBose represented St. Mary's, and Miss McKimmon 
the St. Mary's Auxiliary. Much interest was evidenced in the discus- 
sions concerning the school and the speeches made to the Convention 
in its interest. 

— Letters received by friends here announce that the St. Mary's party 
of teachers are now enjoying themselves in England. The accident to 
their ship the day after their party safely landed in Liverpool served to 
emphasize their arrival on the other side. Misses Hull, Pixley and Pool 
will spend the summer in study in Paris, while Mrs. Irvine goes on to 
Berlin. 

— The Rector and "the family" got off for their summer vacation 
June 19th. Mr. DuBose went to Sewanee, where Miss Margaret had 
preceded him; while Mrs. DuBose, Mrs. Anderson, and "the children" 
go first to Canton and then to Asheville. 

— The sympathy of every member of St. Mary's is with Miss 
Thomas, at the death of her sister, Mrs. Mitchell, wife of Rev. A. R. 
Mitchell, of Greenville, S. C, which occurred June 20. Miss Thomas 
went directly from St. Mary's after Commencement to Greenville to 
be with her sister's children, while Mrs. Mitchell went away for a little 
rest. 

— Miss Chickley's address for the summer is Caimito, Cuba. In the 
fall Bishop Knight's School in Havana, of which she is principal, will 
move into larger quarters, which speaks plainly of its successful 
development. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
„ Mrs. 1 M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, ^ Mrg ; F p Tucker RaleiglC 

(. Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



EDITORIAL NOTES 



Alumnae Muse. 
The interest felt by a considerable number of the alumnae in the April 
Alunmae Muse has been shown in various ways, but in none more 
clearly than by the contributions made by several of the older alumnae 
of reminiscences filling in some of the periods more or less neglected in 
April. It seems wiser to present these articles together than separately, 
and so the November Muse will be made a second special alumnae 
edition, and further contributions of articles dealing either with inci- 
dents or periods in the past history of the school will be very thankfully 
received for publication in that number. Meantime the friends who 
have already written for the Muse will please accept our sincere thanks 
and feel assured of our appreciation of this evidence of their interest. 



Alumnae Bulletin. 

At length we are about ready to send the first edition of the Alumnae 
Number of the School Bulletin to the printer. This first edition will 
necessarily be fragmentary and contain many inaccuracies. There is 
scarcely an old St. Mary's girl who cannot correct some of the inaccu- 
racies or supply some of the missing information. We are not going to 
ask you to do this until the Bulletin appears, but wish to again call 
attention to this publication, in which every alumna should be interested, 
and to ask each person who receives a copy of this Bulletin to look over 
it carefully and give us the benefit of her knowledge, that the second 
edition may be more reliable. Copies of any of the Bulletins may be 
had on application. 



34 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Memorial to Miss Saunders. 
It is a privilege to be able to publish in this number the accompanying 
article on Miss Anne Saunders, from the pen of one of those who knew 
her best. Some friends have suggested, as mentioned elsewhere, the 
appropriateness of placing a memorial window to Miss Saunders in the 
school Chapel, just by the seat which she so regularly occupied. This 
suggestion only needs publicity to insure its carrying out, and in itself 
calls for no comment. The Muse will be glad to communicate with 
friends of Miss Saunders and to receive any contributions for the 
window fund. It is proposed to raise one hundred dollars and to have 
the window in position by All Saints' Day. This will be but a small 
tribute and yet, we venture to say, none would appeal more to Miss 
Saunders were she still with us. 



The Chapel. 

The complete appearance of the Chapel was never more striking than 
on Commencement Day, with the new Smedes Memorial Altar in place. 
As one looked at the different furnishings and furniture which has 
been added to the Chapel in the past two years, all as the gifts of loving 
friends, she could but feel that the St. Mary's spirit was very much 
alive, and that the best tribute that can be paid to the old school and 
its work is found in its life in the hearts of those who have known it best. 
The altar is truly beautiful, and adds much to the appearance of the 
chancel. 

The Rector announced on Commencement Sunday that the Annual 
Fund during the next year would be applied to the purchase of a 
bishop's chair. 

Anne Saunders: 1843-1906. 



Just at twilight, on May the twenty-ninth, Miss Anne Saunders 
fell asleep, to awake in Paradise. 

To those who had watched beside her during the long and weary day, 
it seemed that the last sound of which she appeared conscious was the 
music of the hymn sung by the girls of St. Mary's as they left the Chapel 
after evening prayer. 



The St. Mary's Muse. ' 35 

The next time the "children," as she always called them, assembled 
there, it was to pay the last tribute of love and respect to her who was 
their friend. 

After a short service, attended by the members of the school and by 
many Raleigh people, the mortal remains of Miss Saunders were taken 
to Scotland Neck, to lie in the church-yard there, with her mother and 
her two brothers. 

It seemed particularly appropriate that her active pall-bearers should 
have been students from the A. and M. College; for she had always 
been their especial friend and champion. Who can fail to believe it was 
just as she would have had it? She loved youth, and brightness, and 
cheerfulness, and she left St. Mary's carried by young hands, sur- 
rounded by young girls, who reverently laid upon her coffin their offer- 
ings of white flowers. 

With Miss Saunders in her last illness were her niece and nephew, 
representing the families of her brothers, Richard and Joseph Saun- 
ders. These two, with Mrs. Richard Saunders, her sister-in-law, ac- 
companied her to Scotland JSTeck. 

Many years ago, when the boys' school of St. John's occupied the 
present site of St. Mary's, Bishop Ravenscroft sent to it, as a teacher, 
the Rev. Joseph Saunders, who met in Raleigh and married Miss Laura 
Baker, the daughter of the distinguished physician, Dr. Simmons 
Baker. Soon after his marriage Mr. Saunders was called to a parish in 
Pensacola, Florida. There, in 1845, he died of yellow fever, when his 
only daughter, Anne, was two years old. With her four little children, 
Mrs. Saunders returned to her father's home in Raleigh, and here Miss 
Saunders spent her childhood. Her early education she received at 
St. Mary's, and was then sent, for a year or so, to school in Baltimore. 
In the meantime Mrs. Saunders had moved to Chapel Hill, to be near 
her sons while they were in the University, and there, through all the 
vicissitudes of the War and Reconstruction period, the mother and 
daughter made their home. The brothers of Miss Saunders, William, 
Richard and Joseph, served with distinction in the Confederate army, 
and after the war the former was one of the most prominent and re- 
markable figures in the political life of the State. All of them bore 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 



nobly their share of life's burdens, but none, except Miss Anne, lived 
many years beyond middle life. When her mother died, she came to 
Ealeigh to preside over the home of her brother, Col. Wm. Saunders, i 
then Secretary of State, where she remained until his death. 

Thirteen years ago Miss Anne came to St. Mary's, and since that time 
has been one of the best known and most beloved members of the 
Faculty. The nature of her duties brought her in contact with almost 
every visitor to the school, and no one who met her can forget the I 
charm of her welcome, in her gracious presence as she met the coming or 
sped the parting guest. 

Many an old St. Mary's girl will remember always with gratitude the 
sympathy that helped her through periods of homesickness or illness. 
Handsome in appearance, with the bearing and manners of the finest 
type of gentlewoman, she was in every sense worthy to be placed before 
the younger generation as an example of womanly worth. Possessed of 
many of the best qualities of head and heart, her most distinguishing 
characteristic was, perhaps, her intense loyalty, to her family, to her 
friends, to the school, to which she owed allegiance. 

Her devotion as a daughter, sister and aunt has rarely been equalled. 

Her illness began at Christmas, and during all those months of suffer- 
ing, she was tenderly nursed by her niece, Miss Laura Saunders, and 
received every attention that affection and skill could suggest. But she 
grew tired ; and when the school year came to a close and work was laid 
aside, she, too, ceased her struggle with pain and weakness, and entered 
upon her eternal and glorious holiday. K. C. S. 






Alumnae Notes. 



Among St. Mary's folk in Europe this summer are Miss Sadie 

Root with Mrs. Leak ; and Misses Marion and Sada Hanckel of Charles- 
ton. 

The presence of a goodly number of the younger alumnae at the 

school during the Commencement season was good. We must make 
some more definite provision for regular class reunions. Will the Class 
of 1904 formulate a plan ? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 37 

— Miss Bessie Knox Woodard, of Raleigh, formerly of St. Mary's, 
in May finished her cocmrse and was graduated from the K«w England 
Conservatory of Music. 

— Members of the alumnae were of course rejoiced that the first win- 
ner of the JSTiles Medal, the highest specific reward that has been given 
to a pupil of St. Mary's as a pupil, should have been Miss Lillian 
Farmer, the first wanner and holder of the Alumnae Scholarship. 



Weddings. 



On Saturday, June 2d, in St. John's Church, Fayetteville, Miss 
Lillian Taylor Slocomb was married to Mr. jSTeil Davis Emerson. The 
bride and her sisters, and the sisters of the groom, are all "old St. 
Mary's girls." 

On Wednesday, June -6th, in the First Presbyterian Church, New 
Bern, Miss Annie Stover Stevenson was married to Mr. Edward K. 
Bishop. 

St. Mary's people generally will be much interested in the following 
notice from the News and Observer of June 29 : 

SMEDES-ROSE. 

A wedding of wide interest was solemnized in Christ Church, last evening, when 
Miss Margaret Smedes and Mr. John Irving Rose were united in marriage by the 
Rev. Dr. Marshall. 

Miss Smedes is the daughter of the Rev. Bennett Smedes, late rector of St. 
Mary's, whom women all over the South hold in loving and reverent memory as 
one who "wore the white flower of a blameless life." There were many whose hearts 
went out in tender pride to the sweet girl bride, who embodies these ideals of 
gentleness, unselfishness and true Avomanliness which her father and her grand- 
father spent their lives in implanting, and which have never been more truly ex- 
emplified than in the gracious women of their house. 

Mr. Rose is a Virginian who has engaged in business in Durham within the last 
few years. He is a man who stands well with men, is thoroughly liked and 
respected by them, and he has made many warm friends in his adopted home. 

When the stirring chords of Tannhauser's Wedding March were struck the ushers, 
Messrs. Albert Root, Allen Craig, S. W. Minor, and V. G. Davis, proceeded up the 
aisle in pairs, followed by the pretty flower girls, Misses Bessie and Margaret 
Erwin, who wore white organdie and carried armfuls of pink carnations. Then 
came the bride's twin sisters, daintily duplicate maids of honor, wearing white 
organdies and carrying carnations. 

gaint Mary's School Library 



38 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The bride was exquisitely gowned in white chiffon over silk with a tulle veil 
falling in a soft mist to the end of the train. As she passed to the altar on the 
arm of her uncle, Mr. W. A. Erwin, she was a vision of flower-like loveliness. 

Mr. Rose was accompanied by his best man, Mr. S. C. Chambers. 

The decorations were marked by a churchly simplicity. 

After the ceremony a reception was held to the relatives and a few intimate 
friends, and then Mr. and Mrs. Rose left on the night train for Virginia. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



Bulletin I, 5— which is the catalogue for 1906-07, will be ready July 10. 
Bulletin I, 6 — which is the announcement of the courses for 1906-07 

and scholastic requirements in detail ; containing also the register of 

students and other records of the session of 1905-06, will be ready 

July 20. 
Bulletin I, 7 — Which contains information concerning the Alumnse of 

St. Mary's, will be ready August 15. 



Copies of any of these Bulletins may be had without charge 
by writing to the School. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 



Dry Goods 

OE ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES TTKE SHOES MP SLIPPERS 



..Send to. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks aDd supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of every thing in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W. C. STMACH'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FATETTEVILIE STREET 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 



Student Organizations of St, Mary's. 

Literary. 

Sigma Lambda Literary Society Bi-weekly, Wednesdays, 7 p. m. 

Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society - Bi-weekly, Wednesdays, 7 p. m. 

Muse Club Weekly. 

Athletics. 

Athletic Association Monthly. 

Basket-Ball, Tennis, and Walking Clubs. 
Social. 

Alpha Kappa Psi Sorority. Alpha Chapter. 

Gamma Beta Sigma Sorority. Alpha Chapter. 

Kappa Delta Fraternity. Phi. Delta Chapter. 

Upsilon Delta Sorority. Alpha Chapter. 
South Carolina Club. 

Departmental. 
Glee Club. String Club. Sketch Club. Dramatic Club. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



IATETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



M. ROSENTHAL 
J GO. 



GROCERS 



136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS BEADY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Religious. 
Altar Guild Weekly. 

Junior Auxiliary. 

St. Anne's Chapter East Main Dormitory. 

St. Catharine's Senior Hall. 

St. Elizabeth's Main Floor. 

St. Etheldreda's Rock Houses. 

St. Margaret's West Main Dormitory. 

St. Monica's West Rock Dormitory. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



CHARLES W. BARRETT— Architect 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

GRIMES & VASS, 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleig h, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus $25,000. Deposits over 
8600,000. Four per cent interest paid on de posits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

123 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to earry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Promptness and Neatness with all work. 

Marshall & West, Props. 

POWELL & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



SALYATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 



JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



Student Organizations of St. Mary's 

Required. 
The Class Organizations. 

The Choir. 

The Chorus. 

The Orchestra. 

The Sunday School. 

The Current History Class. 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QXJINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of ISorth Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



ROBT. SIMPSON, 



JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, $225,000. Surplus and Profits, $115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Timbeelake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely- 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



i THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 



$ 100,000.00 

100,000.00 

1,000,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondeuce Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

GEO. MARSH & CO., 
Wholesale (-jroceries, Produce, Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



i 




J^PMfe 



COFFEE 

*BESTGROCERS^ 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D T. JOHNSON & SONS 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 

MjlS REESES E & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



SCHOOL PROGRAM. 



September, 1906. 

September 18, Tuesday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 18-19 Registration, Examination and Classifica- 
tion of City Pupils. 

September 19-20 Registration, Examination and Classifica- 
tion of Boarding Pupils. 

September 20, Thursday 65th Session opens at 10.30 a. m. 

September 21, Friday Regular class hours begin. 



The next number of the Muse, the Summer Number, may be expected September 1. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 
Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of "vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. GATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD F. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, Second Vice-President, 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



Toe Faculty and Officers of St. Mary's, io,o6-'o7. 



Rev. McNEELY DuBOSE Rector. 

Mas. McNEELY DuBOSE School Mother. 

Miss ELIZA POOL Rector's Assistant. 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary. 



The Academic Department. 

Rev. McNEELY DuBOSE i Bible and Ethics. 

( B. S., B. D.— University of the South. ) 

ELEANOR W. THOMAS English and Literature. 

( A. M.— College for Women, Columbia ; graduate student 
Columbia University.) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and German. 

( A. B.— Harvard University. ) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Latin. 

( A. M.— Washington College, ( Md. ) ; graduate student 
Johns Hopkins University. ) 

ELIZA A. POOL French. 



( Sauveur School of Languages ; Portland School of Languages ; 
University Geneva ; Sorbonne ( Paris. ) 

ADA B. SMITH Mathematics. 

( A. B.— Randolph Macon Woman's College. ) 

SARA H. SPURLOCK Science and German. 

( B. S.— University of Nashville ; Peabody Normal College ; graduate 
student University of Berlin. ) 

YANITA CRIBBS ...Elocution and Physical Culture. 

( Tuscaloosa Female College ; University of Alabama. ) 

MARY E. SPANN Preparatory School. 

( Graduate Peabody Normal College. ) 

KATE McKIMMON Primary School. 

( Graduate St. Mary's. ) 



The Music School, 
Almon W. Vincent, Director. 

ALMON W. VINCENT Piano, Organ, Theory. 

( Graduate Royal Conservatory of Music, Leipzig ; teacher seven years, 
Cincinnati College of Music ; director Mt. Allison Conservatory of 
Music ( Canada ) ; National Park Seminary, Washington ; Kee Mar 
Conservatory. ) 

MARTHA A. DOWD Piano, Elementary Theory. 

( Graduate St. Mary's ; pupil of Kursteiner, Sophus Wiig. ) 

CHELIAN H. PIXLEY i Piano. 

( Pupil Miss Schutt ; certificate teacher Virgil Clavier Method ; student 
of Mosskowski, Paris. ) 

Mrs. JESSAMINE HARRISON-IRVINE Piano. 

( Pupil of Carols Sobriuo, Godowsky, and Joseffy. ) 

CHARLOTTE KENDALL HULL Violin, Mandolin, Guitar. 

( Chicago Musical College ; studied in Paris. ) 

Mes. ALMON W. VINCENT Voice. 

( Studied in Cincinnati, Boston, New York, Paris. ) 



The Art School. 

CLARA I. FENNER Director. 

( Graduate Maryland Institute, School of Art and Design ; 
special student Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. ) 



The School of Expression. 

YANITA CRIBBS Director. 

( University of Alabama. ) 



The Business School. 

LIZZIE H. LEE Principal. 

JULIET B. SUTTON Assistant. 



Officers. 

Mrs. K. M. TURNER Housekeeper. 

Miss LOLA E. WALTON Matron of Infirmary. 



LIZZTE H. LEE Bookkeeper. 

JULIET B. SUTTON Stenographer. 



ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Librarian. 

MARY J. SPRUILL Assistant in the Library. 



Motion Central for the Carolinas. \, 



Climate Healthy and Salubriom. 



T . M A R Y > S S-G HOOL, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



(for girls and yowig women). 



>th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 20, 1906. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 24, 1907 



i$t. Mary's 

fers instruction in these 
Departments: 



i: the COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3, THE BUSINESS SCHOOL.. . 
% : THE AR1 SCHOOL. 

£. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



[ri 1905--06 were enrolled 215 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty -five Members, in the Faculty 



e urnishedi Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Milter, Knabe and Stein way Grand Pianos. 
Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 

italogue and other information address 



Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. S., R. D. 

- . RECTOR. 






ftoeMng 



IRaletgb, 





The St. Mary's Muse. 



OPENING NUMBER. 



Vol. XI. October, 1906. No. 2. 



God, Holy Ghost, Saaetifier of the faithful, visit, we pray thee, this School with 
thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with the light of the 
everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; increase in us true 
religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of thy great mercy keep us in the 
same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the Son together, we worship and 
glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



The Sixty-fourth Opening. 



On Thursday, September 20th, with a simple service at eleven in 
the Chapel, the doors of St. Mary's formally opened for the school's 
sixty-fourth session. 

The opening was not markedly different from other similar occasions. 
For several days girls and teachers had been coming in from their homes 
in widely separated localities ready for the work about to begin. New 
girls and old girls; old teachers and new teachers — all with an air of 
interested expectation. The same old lost feeling at the parting with 
the home-folks, the same anticipation at the new impressions about to 
be received was to be noted everywhere. There were a few moments of 
confusion and then a settling down to the occupation of the hour. Old 
associations were to be renewed, new associations to be formed; quar- 
ters to be looked up and fixed up; academic preliminaries to be 
arranged; and ever so much talking to be done on every conceivable 
topic, The equinoctial storm, due at the opening season and threaten- 
ing, was kind enough to do no more than threaten this vear, and though 
the hot spell was unseasonable it was not particularly unpleasant "Reg- 
istration," and "classification," and "tests" and "schedules" claimed 
a proper share of attention, but did not interfere with the consideration 
of "society" and "dancing" and "fun." In fact all were jumbled up 
together into a happy conglomeration until it was time for formalities 
and regular proceedings to begin. 

Saint Mary's School Library 



The St. Mary's Muse. 1 



Teachers and girls, almost every one was on hand for the opening 
service Bishop Cheshire, who has in the past few years been sounding 
the opening note of encouragement and inspiration to high aims, was 
this year detained by illness in his family, and, in his stead, Rev. Mr. 
Boat Rector of St. Stephen's, Durham, made the opening address. 

The service consisted simply of morning prayer and the brief address, 
but it sounded the call to work, and reminded us once more and strongly 
that the summer pleasures were over and school-life, with its pleasures 
and its pains, is with us again. 

The well-known Chapel and familiar form and tones of the Rector 
giving the "home-feeling," made even more strange the absence ol 
familiar forms elsewhere. At the organ, in the choir, among the teach- 
ers and in our midst, the most striking impression was made by the 
new faces. We were ready to welcome the new, but we missed, too the 
old and I venture to say that in those opening hours as many of our 
thoughts were with the friends whom we have known here and shall 
miss this year as with the more pressing events of the hour. And to 
them now, each and all, we waft our love. . . , i 

The opening week was given to perfecting- the preliminaries for work. 
On Sunday, when the rain finally came down in torrents, Bishop Ches- 
hire was able to be with us and at the service in the School-room, and 
in few words impressed upon us that our presence here was due to one 
main object, a desire on the part of each of us to prepare to live to the 
greatest advantage the life of service. With this lesson m our hearts, 
on Tuesday, the 25th, we fell back naturally into the routine of the 
school work. 



Two Autumn Days. 



(From a Floridian's point of view.) 

The sky is as blue, the day is as fair, 

As if summer, not autumn, were here; 

A mocking-bird sings from a tree-top on high, 

On a rose-petal lingers a white butterfly. 

The rivulet sings of the joy of to-day, 

While it merrily hastes on its journey away; 

The trees talk of secrets; and bright nodding flowers 

Whisper stories of bees or of life-giving showers. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



But that's only a dream, though elsewhere 'tis true, 
For here leaves are falling, the sky is not blue; 
The brown fields now tell us that summer has flown, 
The wind shakes the branches; 'tis no song, but a moan. 

And yet comes the thought of that other bright day, 
Where somewhere the birds are still just as gay, 
Where flowers still bloom and streamlets still sing, 
Just as they do on a morning in spring. 



S. C. B. 



Sidney Lanier as a Musician. 



"The artist may raise the many to himself or he may descend to the 
plain of the multitude; the one partakes of the nature of redemptive 
power, the other of that self-abased and degenerate will which flung 
from its splendors the fairest star in Heaven." 

It is not my purpose to show to which class Lanier, in his two-fold 
genius, belongs. One of the highest English authorities has placed him 
first on the roll of American artists, has pronounced him a poet of pas- 
sion and of power, and has said that there is no easily assignable limit 
to his genius. President Gates calls him the apostle of beauty and 
holiness in the history of American art and letters ; and again he says, 
"Lanier's place in the literature of enduring power is secure, fast by the 
pole of the true in thought, the noble and beautiful in deed, round which 
our lives revolve." 

We generally think of Lanier as a poet; but no one can know the 
story of his life without feeling that his deepest passion was for music; 
"it colored his life, fashioned his rhythms, and frequently created his 
meters," and one who knew and loves his own music says : 

"I have never cared for the flute, but, to me, Lanier did not play the 
flute; I only heard a voice breathing unutterable longings, and mes- 
sages of joy and love, and sorrow." 

As a child he learned to play, almost without instruction, on every 
||ind of instrument he could find. It was the violin-voice that above 
all commanded his soul, and in his college days it would so exalt him in 
rapture, that he would presently sink from his solitary music-worship 
into a deep trance, thence to awake, alone, on the floor of his room, 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



S 






sorely shaken in nerve. This powerful fascination of the violin gave 
great anxiety to his father, and in deference to his wishes the boy- 
musician usually devoted himself to the flute, but the old love remained 
and in after years more than one listener remarked the strange violin 
effects he conquered from the flute, 
' We have the following recognition of his genius from Asger Hamerik, 
Director of the Peabody Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore, of which 
Lanier was for six years a member : 

"To him as a child in his cradle music Avas given; the heavenly gift, 
to feel and express himself in tones. His human nature was like an 
enchanted instrument, a magic flute, or the lyre of Apollo, needing but 
a breath or a touch to send its beauty out into the world. In his hands 
the flute no longer remained a mere material instrument, but was trans- 
formed into a voice that set heavenly harmonies into vibration. Its 
tones developed colors, warmth, and a low sweetness of unspeakable 
poetry, * * * suggestive of the depths and heights of being and of the 
delights which the earthly ear never hears, and the earthly eye never 

sees. 

In his youth Lanier's music was almost wholly improvization. A 
friend having asked him how he could always respond when asked to 
play, he replied that he was ever hearing- a ceaseless flow of melody and 
had'onlv to utter it in tone; that his sole difficulty was not to listen 
when the duties of life claimed his attention. It is interesting, in thil 
connection, to hear of the poet playing before Dr. Damrosch, of New 
York, and confiding to him his wish to pursue the study of music. 
Doctor Damrosch asked: "Do you know what that means? It meane 
a great deal of work; it means a thousand sacrifices; it is very hazard 
ous." Lanier replied, "I know all that; it is not a. matter of mer 
preference, I must be a musician, it is a spiritual necessity." 

We will pause for a moment to recall one of Lanier's most pleasan 
recollections of his army life, his welcome to a beautiful home on the 
James, where he received the genuine hospitality of a Virginia home. 

With the oldest daughter of the house he formed a life-time friend- 
ship and it is to her that we are indebted for one of the most eloquent, 
and 'tender pictures of Lanier's early life, Some Memories of Lanier, 
printed in the Southern Bivouac. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



She says: "Lanier's letter of introduction was a coarse piece of 
Confederate paper, found, one bitter cold morning, tied to the door with 
a guitar string. On it was written : 

Porch, Saturday Morning, 1 o'clock. 

Did all mortal man could to serenade you; failure owing entirely to inclemency 
of the weather. Field Cokps. 

How often after this did we sit in the porch at night, enthralled by 
the melody of his flute. The trill of birds in the morning silence, tones 
like those of a hidden brook in the leafy month of June, and underlying 
all, the cry of the human heart. Always the longing for the very highest 
pervaded his life, and, child though I was, in listening to him as he 
paced the galleries of my old home, or as we rode in the sweet, green 
woods, I felt even then that we sat in the aurora of a sunrise that 
would put out all the stars." 

In 1867 Lanier married Miss Mary Day, then of Macon, Georgia, 
a wife who was ever the strength and stay of his peculiarly check- 
ered life. 

Soon after his marriage a startling premonition came in the form of 
hemorrhage from the lungs, and during the remainder of his life the 
toil toward the support of his family was carried on between these 
exhausting attacks. His father, a lawyer in Macon, wished him to 
become a partner in his business, and filial tenderness, as well as obe- 
dience to the stern necessities of life would have led him to this course, 
but he was physically debarred from it. He could not speak in public 
without hemorrhage, and office work was attended by the same disas- 
trous results. Thus ill health opened the way to the art life he craved. 
In 1873 he took his flute and pen to be his sole dependence, and after 
measuring his strength with the master flutists of ISTew York, he located 
in Baltimore, and became first flute in the Peabody Symphony Orches- 
tra, keeping his position six years out of the ensuing seven. 

Then it was that Asger Hamerik, his director, said of him — 

I will never forget the impression he made on me when he played the 
flute-concerto of Emil Hartman at a Peabody Symphony concert; his 
tall, handsome, manly presence, his flute breathing noble sorrows, noble 
joys, the orchestra softly responding. The audience was spell-bound. 
Such distinction, such refinement! He stood, the master, the genius. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mrs. Lanier, while showing me fragments of his unfinished work, 
said "Broken stones, but O, how precious!" and the deep regret for 
"what might have been" prevented my feeling that God had allowed him 
the full twelve hours of his day. But when I think of his beautiful, 
unwritten music, his own words come back, "Beauty dieth not, and the 
heart that needs it will find it." "Beauty dieth not," — may there not 
yet come to us echoes from "the Heaven-side bank of the Biver of 
Death." 

Lanier mapped out for himself more than a full life work, and, as 
the days were darkening around him, he worked on as plays a little 
child," sure of the Father, self, and love alone." But his day was fast 
reaching eventide, and those who most loved him determined to try a 
more healing air. 

They came first to Asheville, 1ST. C. Three miles from the town, Mr. 
Lanier, with his wife, brother, and infant son, went into camp, hoping 
much from life in that pure air. But the hope was futile ; the air was 
too bracing and the enfeebled lungs could not bear the sharp stimulus. 
Meanwhile, reports had come of a sheltered valley among the moun- 
tains of Polk County, where the climate is tempered by a curious cur- 
rent of warm air along the slope of Tryon Mountain, its northern boun- 
dary, a sort of etherial gulf stream. So, early in August, Lanier with 
his wife, started to Tryon to test this more healing air. 

They traveled most of the way by private conveyance, his invalid 
chair, which made all his rest by day and by night, fastened to the back 
of his carriage. The long journey was broken by a visit to friends of 
Mrs. Lanier's youth, partly to spare her husband's failing strength, but 
above all, to cement the friendship with the father of the house, whom 
he had lately met and quickly loved with all of a son's tender reverence. 
It was in this house, the meeting place of all sweet nobilities of nature 
and the human spirit, that he uttered his last music on earth, and one 
of the family has told me the story. 

At close of day Lanier came in and passed down the long drawing- 
room until he reached a western window. In the distance were the far- 
reaching Alleghany hills, with Mount Pisgah supreme among them, and 
the intervening valley bathed with sunset beauty. Absorbed away from 
those about him, he watched the sunset glow deepen into twilight, then 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



sat down to the piano facing the window. Sorrow and joy and pain and 
hope and triumph the soul poured forth. They felt in that twilight 
hour he had listened to an angel's psalm. Who knows ? It was a very 
short time before his spirit joined forever the heavenly harmonies — and 
this was his Swan Song. Mart E. Spann. 



Das Gelbe Voglein. 



1. 
Heute sah ich ein Voglein, 

Em kleines, fluchtiges Ding, 
Gelbe wie der Sonnenschein, 

Oder Blumchen im Fruhling. 

2. 
Vielleicht kann es schon singen, 

Urn dass weiss ich nicht wohl; 
Hoffnungen im Sinne springen 

Dass ich es horen soil. 

3. 
Ach, kleines, prachtiges Voglein, 

Du hast mein Herz mit dir; 
Ach, bitte, komm' zum Vorschein 

Und gieb es wieder mir. S. C. B. 



The Summer Moon. 



MARY E. VANN, '09. 



It was down in a black-dark hollow that a mouldy stone door stood 
against the inside wall of a. tower's entrance. Rich moss covered the 
walls of the round entry, and the stone steps, where they had fallen 
apart and the soil had filled in the crevices, were soft with ferns. What 
was once a stair of stone rose higher than a man's head, and then had 
broken and fallen. Just above there a part of the wall had sunk down, 
and the moonlight shone in bright as day, making a slant of silver, that 
showed wet dew drops in the spiders' webs and made them shine like 
diamonds. Two sides of the tower rose high up, and, meeting, formed 
a jagged edge. There, in the sheltered corner where the walls met was 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 



a little lake of sparkling water. The light and shadow falling on it 
from the door was checkered, silver white and dark green — black, dark 
in the shadow, but where the moon shone, white as snow, with a pale 
kind of light. 

The ruins of the tower stood on the peak of the highest of a group 
of hills, and half the full moon was coming from behind it, with a long 
white cloud above. A narrow path through the high trees and under- 
brush dropped steep, down, almost from the very hole that was once a 
door to the tower, till it reached in a hollow among the hills a flat place 
with a smooth carpet of green marked with rings of grass where the 
fairies danced. 

A solitary man was coming slowly across the little meadow from 
among the trees, where a murmuring sound told of running water. 
His boots shone with water, and even the plume on his slouch ha.t was 
wet from brushing through the dewy woods. His face was white and 
tired, but he kept steadily on to the tower, for he knew that there he 
might rest. Slowly climbing up the steep path, nearly on the face of 
the hill, he thought how little of the old tower's pride remained, when 
this bridle-path, made by animals, was the only access that was left to it. 
At last he reached the door, and stopped. Tired as he was, he saw the 
beauty of the night, and it was with a prayer in his sold that he entered. 
He knew that it was a little past midnight, and he would have to wait 
three or four hours before he could deliver his precious letter to the 
next courier; so, after seeing his letter safe, he folded his cloak and 
pulled down his hat, to lie down and rest. 

He did not sleep, but when he roused himself, everything was gray, 
and the spiders' webs now looked like bunches of gray fur. For a time 
things seemed still, and then came a trampling sound of horse's hoofs, 
through the vines and shrubbery that were overgrowing the path. In 
the next minute the letter had changed hands, and the fresh horseman 
was flying down the hill. Then, before turning his face homeward, the 
man bathed his hands and wrists in the clear, cold water, and a handful 
of berries made his breakfast ; as he turned away from the lonely tower, 
the bats were flying in the top, just come to sleep, and the moon was a 
sickly white in the gray sky. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Peace. 

Far out in the western ocean 

A fragile plant doth grow, 
And the stem that leans on its billows 

Reaches hundreds of feet below. 

It bears the rush of the waters 

And the waves that forever flow; 
For the roots of the plant reach downward 

To the calm, still depths below. 

And the rootlets clinging firmly 

To the anchoring rocks secure, 
In spite of the surface surges, 

In safety shall endure. 

And thou, child, when thou tossest 

On the crest of life's billowy sea, 
Let thy soul have its anchor eternal, 

And naught can be hurtful to thee. 

And though darkness and tempest may claim thee, 

And thou toss on the awful crest, . 

The calmness of peace shall surround thee, 
If in God thy spirit shall rest. 

M. E. S. 



Agnes of Glasgow. 



Camden is a very old town and lias many places of historical interest 
m and about it. One particularly interesting object is a rude grave all 
grass grown and neglected, with a rough stone at its head. The little 
story connected with it is very sweet and pathetic. 

Lord Cornwallis, the great British General during the Eevolutionary 
War, was in love with a beautiful young girl of Glasgow, Scotland. 
They were happy in each other's love, and although her parents were 
opposed to their union, they hoped in time to be able to overcome the 
opposition. A few months passed, days of perfect happiness to the 
lovers, and then Cornwallis was called to America to fight for his 
country. With much sadness he told Agnes good-bye, trying to com- 
fort her with the hope that they would be united again. 



10 The St. Mart's Muse. 



After his departure, Agnes, never very strong, became weak and pale, 
seeming to lose interest in everything. His letters were few and far 
between, as mails in those days from across the water were not very 
frequent. At last Agnes felt that she could stand the separation no 
longer and resolved to follow her lover. Without the knowledge of her 
parents, she stole away one night and boarded a ship for America. 
Every one on the boat wondered who the pale, beautiful girl seemingly 
so anxious to land was. The trip across was rather rough, and when 
Agues landed at Charleston she was very sick, utterly unable to con- 
tinue her journey, but still would not rest. She inquired where Lord 
Cornwallis had pitched camp, and was told at Camden, in the north 
central part of the State. She procured a horse and left Charleston, 
almost panting with fatigue and weakness. Early one morning Lord 
Cornwallis was standing at the door of his tent, gazing dreamily into 
the distance, thinking of his loved one so far away. Suddenly a slight 
noise startled him and, looking up, he saw a slender, drooping figure 
leaning against a tree and looking with wide yearning eyes at the dif- 
ferent soldiers. When he caught her eye, he realized that it was Agnes 
and sprang towards her. She recognized him with a cry of joy, exclaim- 
ing, "Oh ! my love, is it indeed you" ? and fainted in his arms. He 
carried her tenderly into his tent, and when she awoke to consciousness 
he was kneeling beside her. She smiled at him faintly, but wds too 
exhausted to speak, and soon began to talk deliriously about her jour- 
ney from Scotland. Her fever raged for about a fortnight, and she 
gradually became weaker and weaker until one afternoon she passed 
away, a happy smile on her lips. 

The soldiers buried her near the camp, and with their swords cut 
these words on the headstone, "Here lies the body of Agnes of Glasgow." 

E. J. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 

MuS Sub StUdGntS and A1Umn "' Under the editorial management of the 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

n . THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. ' 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Serena 0. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. Jessie Page Hareis, Business Manager 

Sue Brent Price, Elizabeth Waddill. ' Helen Strange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Louise Hill. 



EDITORIAL. 



Perhaps it might be well to say a word to the girls regarding their 
interest and share in the Muse work. This year we are starting out 
under new management and the editors are trying- to raise the standard 
and widen the scope of the magazine. We wish the aid and enthusiasm, 
therefore, of every teacher and pupil, for without it we cannot produce 
the best order of school monthly. 



The fact of the additions to and improvements in the library suggest 
to us that possibly we might aid in this work; from time to time per- 
haps the literary societies might give a few books or an artistic bust or 
picture. We merely offer this as a suggestion, hoping that the socie- 
ties will find some merit in it. 



We hope that this year there will be a genuine enthusiasm for ath- 
letics. While the first rush of school work has so far prevented the 
organization of the athletic club, it is now time that the out-door sports 
begin in earnest. 

In entering upon the new year the new management contemplate no 
radical changes in their efforts with the Muse. The magazine will con- 
tinue to be a school newspaper and not a literary attempt, and will still 



12 The St. Mart's Muse. 



make the effort to be interesting at once to alumnse, to the student-body, 
and to all friends of the school. In an effort to make the working force 
more effective a change has been made in the editorial management, and 
this year the Senior Class will give their special attention as a class to 
the publication of the annual Muse, leaving the monthly to be published 
by the Muse Club. Inasmuch as the business interests of the two 
publications are the same and the publications themselves are very 
closely allied in other ways as well as in name, the change is rather in 
form than in fact. 

With the same purpose as last year— to stimulate interest and 
lead to more frequent contributions of material suitable for printing in 
the paper— the management again offers the Muse souvenirs, an annual 
Muse to be awarded at Commencement to the student-author of the 
best story, of the best sketch, and of the best verses, offered for publica- 
tion in the Muse during this session. 









To the members of the alumni, who have attended so many services 
in St. Mary's Chapel, the prayer on the first page will recall hosts of 
memories. We believe that in the past it has been typical of the school 
spirit and aim, and we hope that our ideals, like those of our predeces- 
sors, will be moulded by the standard that it sets before us. 

Perhaps it is rather trite to say that our school life is the preparation 
for our work in the outside world. We should realize even more than j 
we do, however, that our characters are being formed at this period of 
our lives. Much of the future depends upon how we use the present. I 
Our habits, indeed, are now being rapidly fixed; once formed, it is 
almost impossible to change them'. We should remember, therefore, | 
that a clean page is spread before us; we alone are responsible for the 
record written there. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



— This session lias seen the usual number of change's in the student- 
body. Our number is full to overflowing, and there doesn't seem to 
be at present even "room for one more," but many old friends we should 
like to have with us are missing. There are many "jolly, nice girls" 
in their places, but we wish we could have both old and new. 

— Among our old girls who are now attending other schools, Bessie 
Albright and Mildred Smith are at Hollins ; Ella Croft, Helen Alston 
and Helen Breeden at Converse ; Josephine Boylan, Estelle Farrior and 
Blandina Springs are at Gunston, where Emmie Drewry is continuing 
her studies; Virginia Bailey is at The Stuart School in Washington; 
Marjorie Robertson is at National Park Seminary; Mamie Wilder is 
at Louisburg College, and Anne Miller is at Chatham; while Virginia 
Saunders is taking a special course in art at the College for Women at 
Columbia. From the clay pupils we miss Hannah Ashe, Ruby Morris 
and Rosalind Williamson, who are at Gunston Hall ; and Dee Duncan, 
who is attending Salem College. 

— Julia Mclntyre has been obliged by illness to go home, but she 
expects to return by the beginning of the next quarter. 

— During the month Alice Corbett visited her home and Sarah Jones 
spent a few days in Pittsboro in order to attend weddings. 

— On account of the death of their grandmother, Mary Spruill and 
Sallie Haywood Battle were called home in the latter part of September. 

— Lina deRosset is in Baltimore continuing her studies at the Pea- 
body Conservatory; Margaret Wilson is at the Cathedral School, Garden 
City, L. I. 

—Kate Gary has a good position as stenographer in Henderson — 
Eula Gregory is teaching and Maria Tucker leaves for the West in a 
short while, where she will remain until June. 

— Some of the girls have been very fortunate this month in having 
visits from their relatives ; Emilie Campbell's mother and father, Mary 
Wiggins's brother, Helen Strange's uncle, and Page Shelbourne's father 
and mother have been here. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Several of the old girls have been back for very short visits ; Mary 

Sturgeon, Betsy London, Octavia Hughes, Annie Gray Nash, Jessie 
Crosswell, Mary Kobinson, Elizabeth Temple and Nancy Fairley, and 
although we saw very little of them, we enjoyed that little very much. 

It is a special regret that we are not able to welcome back those 

detained by sickness. Sadiebelle McGwigan is this year at the Woman's 
College of Richmond, going there in order to be under the care of a 
specialist ; Dannie Moore's place was with her grandmother, Mrs. Man- 
ning, who is in poor health ; and George Shaw is not yet strong enough 
to be with us. 

The new girls are almost too many for mention. There is a larger 

proportion than usual of girls who have been going to schools in the 
North. From New Jersey comes Carile Weaver, last year at Flushing 
Seminary; Sidney Gabbett, of Savannah, comes from the Lawrence 
(Mass.) High School; Marguerite Thompson, Marguerite LeCron and 
Isabel Hanna, of Baltimore, have been trained at the Girls' Latin 
School; Florence Beckwith and Margaret Williams, of Jacksonville, 
have been at Miss Phelps' School in Cleveland, 0. ; Isabel Heyward, of 
Savannah, has been in the Washington schools. 

Our Florida group is larger this year, with Serena. Bailey, Mary 

Gwyn, Florence Beckwith, Margaret Williams, Alice Munnerlyn, Mary 
Hoke, Jane Stillman and Elizabeth Watters. The East Carolina group, 
too, is more numerous, and the representatives are good ones. There 
are Eva and Ida Rogerson and Annie Wood, of Edenton, accom- 
panied this year by Louise Moore and Elizabeth Dixon; Eloise 
Robinson, Jennie Simpson and Minnie Leary, of Elizabeth City ; Ruth 
Newbold and Mary Gaither, of Hertford ; Matilda Haughton, Mary Vir- 
ginia Bonner, Mabel Willis and Mary Tankard, of Washington ; Ruth 
Mardre and Margaret Rayner, of Windsor ; Minnie Davis, of Beaufort ; 
Mary Carraway and Mary Hughes, of New Bern, and Helen Quinerly, 
of Ayden ; Mary Alexander, of Creswell ; Irene Smith, of Williamston ; 
and Bliss Perry, Iris Mitchell and Alice Hines, of Kinston. 

The girls from the west are more scattered. Asheville is repre- 
sented by Katharine Henderson, Sarah Jones, Lottie and Daisy Sherrill, 
Helen Gwyn and Emilie Campbell ; Lincolnton by Susan Bynum ; Valle 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 

Crucis by Mary Hardin; Waynesville by Josephine Gilmer; Franklin 
by Iris Porter ; Brevard by Jesse Chapman ; and Hickory by Mary Shu- 
ford and Frankie Self. 

— Charlotte this year sends Sadie Thomas, Lula Taliaferro, Helen 
Liddell, Marie Koiner and Alice Moore ; Salisbury, Katharine Overman 
and Ha Thompson ; High Point, Alice Smith ; Greensboro, Sarah Belle 
Adams, Lila, Justice, Blanche Robinson, Lyman Grimsley and Annie 
Glenn; Concord is represented by Mary Bingham and Mary Brown; 
Albemarle by Theresa King; Thomasville by Margaret Gates; Lexing- 
ton by Louise Hill. 

— Genevieve Cooper, Jessie Harris and Corinne Gregory are our 
"Henderson girls"; Martha. Ferebee is Oxford's sole representative; 
Kate Blacknall, from Kittrell, Mary Spruill, of Littleton, and Grace 
Ward of Franklinton, make up the "crowd" from that section. Rocking- 
ham has Manie Parsons and Pattie Wall ; Monroe, Mary Vann ; San- 
ford, Almeria Swann ; Jacksonville, Leila Sabiston, and Farmville, 
"Lady" Turnage. From Apex comes Elizabeth Sturgeon, and from 
McCullers, Alice McCullers. ; j , ; 1 

— Scotland Neck we are glad to have again well represented by 
Rebecca. Clark and Rebe Shields; Georgia. Hales "talks" for Wilson; 
Blanche King- upholds the dignity of Goldsboro ; Sallie Battle stands for 
Rocky Mount. From Tarboro come Margaret Pennington and Eliza- 
beth Battle; Nannie Campbell hails from Fayetteville. 

— Last, but not least, the all-conquering "Wilmington girls": Sue 
Prince, Helen Strange, Marguerite Short, Page Shelburn, and their 
younger sisters, Wilhelmina Harlow and Eliza Morton. 

— The South Carolina representation about holds its own in num- 
bers. There are Frances Lee, Irving Morgan, Chevilette Kinloch, 
Inez Frazer, Nathalie Dotterer, and Hazle Middleton, of Charleston; 
Annie and Mary Wells and Janie DuBose, of Columbia; Emily and 
Hallie Garrison and Alice Corbett, of Camden ; Ellen Duvall, Elizabeth 
Waddill and Phyllis Hickson, of Cheraw; Lillian Farmer, Jessie Jen- 
nings and Beatrice Cohen, of Florence; Meta and Sarah Boykin, of 
Boykin; Bessie Arthur, of Union; Gladys Huff, of Laurens; Julia 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mclntyre, of Mullins; Norman Leland, of Great Falls; Cornelia Nixon, 

of . . . . ; Paula Hazard, of Georgetown; Christine Frazier ; of 

Ninety-Six. 

— Georgia's group includes Nell Atkinson, Allene Gentry, Doris 
Moody and Julia Kosser, of Atlanta; Isabel Heyward, of Savannali; 
Myrtle Powell, of Griffin; Coatsie Benedict, of Athens; Allie Stokes, 
of Waycross, and Burlington Butt, of Columbus. 

— Jenniebelle Turner and Lelia Jemison, of Tuscaloosa, represent 
Alabama; Kosa Heath, of Petersburg, and Mary Wiggins, of Suffolk, 
strange to say, are the only daughters of Virginia. Annie Harriss now 
claims Washington, D. C, as her abiding-place; and from far off Den- 
ver comes Margaret Temple. 

— These, with the "Baltimore girls" and the others from further 
north, before mentioned, make up the resident St. Mary's girls of 
1906-'07. One hundred and forty-two in all, they are a half-dozen 
more in number than the school has sheltered for many years, and yet 
their number goes chiefly to show that it is "quality not quantity that 
counts." 

— The great event of the month was the Pair. Since the beginning 
of school we have been looking forward to and making all kinds of 
plans for it, and although we went on Wednesday, it was drizzling 
almost all day, we had a fine time in spite of the weather. In addition 
to all the sideshows, Ferris wheels, merry-go-rounds, "come-back" balls 
and other attractions, almost all of us (in onr many wanderings up and 
down the midway) met friends from home. Everybody had her for- 
tune told and picture taken in an automobile, and came back armed 
with canes, little pink and blue "skidoo" hats, and various other 
regalia, which now ornament our walls, much to the despair of the 
maids who have to dust them. Strange to relate, there was no confetti, 
and on account of the rain, no dust at all, but some of the people seemed 
to think there was dust, for they were constantly brushing off our faces 
for us. We were very tired when we got back, and were glad to think 
of having all the next day in which to do nothing but think of the good 
time we had. 






The. St. Mary's Muse. 17 



"Strange Ideas." 



English, teacher to the sophomore class : What is of most importance 
in writing a theme ?" 
Eager girl: "Paper." 



Girl : "What are you going to the penitentiary for ?" 
S. T. : "Oh, I'm going to get a pennant." 



I felt real sorry for Mr. S — at the Fair. There he was walking 
about all alone. But when I went up to him consolingly he smiled 
sweetly and said : "Not at all ; not at all. They all promised faithfully 
they would be back in just a minute. 



Some advice to Freshies from the Armour Tech : 

Don't tell us your business. We don't care how much money your 
Dad has or what kind of shanty you live in. 

Don't eat with your knife and do not try to swallow a whole piece of 
bread at a bite. 



Miss Thomas, in Senior English — "In the formation of English sur- 
names, "ess" placed at the end signified 'little.' " 
B. 0.— "Then does Thomas mean 'Little Tom' ?" 



(With apologies to Mr. DuBose.) 

Conversation between Mindab (ancient cat that was here about ten 
years ago) and a younger cat — 

"Mamma, I need a catechism." Mindab: "No, Tommy, you are too 
young. What you need is a kitty-chism." (Adapted.) 



English teacher, making clear an obscure point in the lesson: 
"Now if a man had died when he was a little bov — " 



I was a good French scholar, I — 
But my star's gone from yonder sky. 
So many Latin roots at first 
Have made it went and gone and burst. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



For general comfort: 

Warm milk can be had from Mrs. Turner. 

All clay suckers may be obtained at the "little store." 



We have a new guardian — Miss Pool; 
She has much to say in our school. 

She keeps all us girls 

In most terrible whirls — 
Each day we unearth a new rule. 

Miss Thomas — she's in Senior Hall, 

And is not so tremendously tall ; 
But she's tall enough, quite, 
When we don't uo quite right — 

And we feel so exceedingly small. 

Miss Cribbs is the angel, they say, 
Whose picture is kissed every day, 

By the girls of her floor — 

Full a dozen or more; 
She must feel quite honored, that way. 

Miss Sutton has charge of the mail ; 

And takes care of every detail; 
When our letters don't come, 
And we don't hear from home, 

She hears a most terrible wail. 

Of "kid faculty" we can count one — 
She imagines her schooling is done — 

The girls all prefer 

To go shopping with her, 
Because they can have more fun. 

Every morn at the break of the day 
We get up and wend quickly our way 

To the dark study-hall, 

To enjoy the roll-call. 
If we're late — what does Miss Katie say? 

"The Twins" — you know just who I mean- 
Almost always together are seen; 

The girls send them fruit, 

They think them so "cute," 
And know they're as "dear" as they seem. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Eenest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnte Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 

VTrw-PRTi-c i TTni-isrT<s J Mrs - L M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 
vice ^eesidents, < Mrg F p Tucker Ra i e i g b, 

[Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 

Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



The Saunders Memorial Window. 



During the summer months, when the publication of the Muse was 
suspended, the first steps were taken in the accumulation of the fund 
for the memorial to Miss Saunders. No definite effort has been made 
as jet to secure this fund, and we do not believe that it will require 
more than the mere bringing of the object to the attention of the many 
friends of Miss Saunders to effect its completion. Whatever is done 
will be done now speedily. We would therefore call the attention of 
all who wish to have a part in the memorial to the work and ask for 
their prompt attention. 

The Memorial, as announced in the June Muse will take the form of 
a window in the Chapel just opposite the seat which Miss Anne so 
long occupied at the services. It was hoped to have the window in 
place in time for its unveiling on Founders' Day. That is now impos- 
sible, but unless there is some unforeseen delay it will be ordered in time 
to be dedicated at Epiphany. While nothing ornate is desired we 
would have the window as rich in its simplicity as possible. This mat- 
ter must depend on the fund. 

Copies of the June Muse., with full information, may be had by 
writing to the Muse, which will also receive and acknowledge any con- 
tributions. 



The next number of the Muse will be a special Alumnse number on 
the order of that of April last. The editors would greatly appreciate 
news-items and reminiscences of the "old girls" of all past generations, 
early and late ; and also any suggestions from them about what they 
would wish to see in these special numbers, intended especially for them. 



20 The St. Mart's Muse. 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 



With the Girls of Recent Years. 

— Margaret Mackay lias joined the corps of St. Mary's girls in the 
City Schools of Raleigh. 

— Mary Lassiter spent the summer at home and is now teaching 
music, her beloved, in the High School of Courtland, Va. 

— Ruth Foster gave a house-party in July to a number of her St. 
Mary's friends and others, and some of the party haven't recovered 
from the effects yet. 

— Jane Iredell Green went from school northward, spent a month in 
Richmond, exhibited her laurels to many admirers and now is enjoying 
the pleasures of Wilmington, and showing her ability. 

—And "Ret" Ruff, Annie Sloan, Gertrude Sullivan, and "Bettie" 
Woolf, where, where are they ? We beg that they will tell us, that 
we, in turn, may tell their admiring friends before another Muse 
appears. 

■ — The girls of the class of 1906 are not keeping us as well posted 
about their goings and comings as we think they ought. If we make 
any false statements about them it will be "all their fault," What we 
don't know, we "imagine." 

— Annie Koonce, not satisfied with her class honors, distinguished 
herself further by good work at the State Summer School, held at 
A. and M. College in July, and is now giving the proof of the pudding 
in the school at , near Wilmington. 



With Our Teacher Friends. 

— Miss Margaret Jones, last year at the Teachers' College, this year 
has charge of the Mathematics in Flushing Seminary, Flushing, 1ST. Y. 

— Mile. Gerber, who left our faculty in 1904, is entering upon her 
second year at Miss Knox's School, Briarcliff Manor, K Y., where she 
had a very pleasant and successful session last year. 

— Miss Mabel Hale, of late years at Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis., 
has this session again come east and is in charge of the Latin classes at 
the Bryn Mawr Preparatory School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 



The St. Mast's Muse. 21 

— Miss Kate Shipp is not in regular school work this year, but is 
living at her home in Raleigh and doing private tutoring, a fortunate 
thing for those who may wish to be tutored. 

— Miss Imogen Stone, of Sophie JSTewcomb College, Tulane Univer- 
sity, JSTew Orleans, has this year a leave of absence, which she is spend- 
ing at Teachers' College, Columbia University, Xew York. Miss Susan 
Moses, also recently of Tulane University, has this year joined the 
faculty of Sweet Briar Institute, the new Virginia college. 

— It is very pleasant to hear more and more favorable comment on the 
excellent work Miss Alice Jones is doing as head of the Latin Depart- 
ment at Winthrop College. This fall, Miss Kate Meares, who was 
with us last year, is temporarily assisting Miss Jones, her former 
teacher, in the absence of the regular assistant, We know that she 
could not have more congenial work. 

— a The Sanborns" are teaching after all, and enjoying their home 
at the same time. Mr. Sanborn is Director of Music at the Southern 
Seminary at Buena Vista, in which he was teaching before he last 
came to St, Mary's, and Mrs. Sanborn has charge of the Vocal Training. 
Miss Gertrude Sanborn is teaching Vocal Training at the College for 
Women, Columbia, S. C, and Miss Margaret is at home keeping house 
for her father and mother. 

—Our party abroad this summer had the best of times. They went 
immediately after landing at Liverpool to Paris, where the party sepa- 
rated, Miss Hull and Miss Pixley, with Miss Pool, spending the sum- 
mer there, while Mrs. Irvine went to Germany. Mrs. Irvine spent 
most of the summer off the Baltic coast at the old fortress town of 
Herringsdorf-on-the-Baltic, the home of Leopold Godowsky, with whom 
she was studying. She later visited Berlin and Hamburg; and then, 
after rejoining Misses Hull and Pixley, they together travelled in 
Enedancl. 



Miss ChecKIey and Her Cuban Worl^. 

The recent scenes in Cuba come more plainly before us, as we read 
the following from Miss Checkley: 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 






Caimito, Cuba, Sept. 9th. 
I think it will interest several readers of The Muse to know that I am now in 
the battle-line of the Revolution, with a rebel camp of eight hundred close to us, and 
that we have had direct messages from some of our farm-laborers, now in the rebel 
camp, that our lives are safe, and that our property will be strictly respected by 
order of the rebel chiefs concerning foreigners, — but that we must guard our horses, 
mules and stock against stragglers. As the rebels have actually been on our finca, 
and as all the week we had constant contact with them (every man working for us, 
and in the neighboring village of Grayabal being Liberal — that is, on the rebel 
side, — ) an( i as we are also in touch with the government garrison in Caimito, we 
are having rather exciting times at present. * * * 

Miss Checkley was called last year to be the first principal of The 
Cathedral School in Havana, Bishop Knight's new Church school for 
girls. The school had a very successful first year, under her direction, 
and this session has had to find larger quarters, the most tangible evi- 
dence of its growth. Miss Checkley's new address is 

El Colegro del Cabildo Catedral, 

Esquina El Paseo y Calle 15, 

El Vedado, La Habana, Cuba. 
(The Cathedral School, corner of Paseo and 15th streets, The Vedado, Havana.) 

The Havana Press says: 

The announcement of the opening of the Cathedral School for girls in the Vedado, 
has been sent to persons interested, in the city of Havana. The school will be 
located in a large house at the corner of Paseo and 15th streets. The faculty has 
been extended, and this year promises to be a memorable one in the advancement 
of work undertaken. 

The contents of the annual announcement are given herewith: 

"The second annual session of the Cathedral School for girls will open October 1st, 
in Vedado. 

"The course includes the higher English branches, both academic and collegiate, 
Latin, French, Spanish, intermediate and primary grades, based on the public and 
high school system in Washington, D. C, with daily classes in drawing, physical 
culture, needlework and special departments of music, art and elocution. 

"The faculty, consisting of experienced teachers, comprises Miss Checkley, princi- 
pal, late of St. Mary's Diocesan School of North and South Carolina; Miss Sarah 
Acosta, of the New Paltz Normal School, New York, teacher of intermediate grades 
and Spanish; Miss Maria Cabrera, teacher of art, Spanish and needlework; Miss 
Sarah H. McGee, of the Boston Conservatory, teacher of music, and Mrs. Maclean 
Beers, teacher of elocution. 

"Terms for tuition in highest classes are $6 American currency per month, one 
centen per month for lower grades, and reductions will be made for two or more 
pupils from the same family. Special terms made for music, art and elocution." 






The St. Maky's Muse. 23 

Miss Cheekley has this to say of the 1906 Annual: 

Caimito, Cuba, Sept. 8, 1906. 

Miss Cheekley desires to express her warm and sincere thanks to the editors of the 
"06 Muse for the handsome volume presented to her, which she received with much 
pleasure and thorough appreciation, and she hereby compliments the editorial staff 
upon the success of the '06 annual and the results of the editors' faithful labors. 

Viva La Prensa del Collegio de Santa Maria. 

We echo back: 

Viva La Directora del Colegio del Cabildo Catedral. 



Mid Life and Death. 



From time to time through the vacation months items of interest, full 
of meaning for many friends who have known the individuals concerned, 
and oft times meaning much to the St. Mary's of to-day as well as to the 
St. Mary's of other days, have come to the Muse. Some bear a mas- 
sage of joy, and others one of sorrow. Each has its own message, and 
they lose none of their force when the clippings are allowed to tell 
their own story : 

(Prom the Baltimore Sun of June 20.) 
Mrs. Helen B. G-ifford, wife of Capt. John H. G-ifford, United States Army, retired, 
died suddenly Friday night at the Sherwood Inn, Old Point Comfort. Born in 
Baltimore, Mrs. Gifford was a daughter of the late William H. and Ann Kimberly. 
She is survived by her husband and one daughter, Miss Anne K. Gifford. 



Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Vick 

request the honor of your presence at 

the marriage of their daughter, 

Ernestine Hufham, 

to 

Mr. Cola Martin Early, 

Wednesday evening, June twenty-seventh, 

nineteen hundred and six, 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 

Elm City, North Carolina. 



(From the Southern Churchman of August 3.) 

WETMORE.— Entered into the joy of his Lord, August 3, 1906, at the Mission 
Hospital, Asheville, N. C, the Rev. Thomas Cogdell Wetmore, Rector of Christ 
School, Arden, N. C, and of Calvary Church, Fletcher, N". C, aged 37 years. 

"The joy of the Lord is my strength." 

"He went about doing good." 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



(From the Southern Churchman.) 
An announcement of interest to Church people in South Carolina is that Mrs. Ivy 
C4ass, widow of the late Rev. John Gass, is to be married to the Rt. Rev. Theodore 
D. Bratton, Bishop of Mississippi, on August 15, at Sewanee, Term. They are 
worthy of each other, which is saying a good deal for both. 



Reverend and Mrs. Nathaniel Harding 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter, 

Mary Elizabeth, 

to 

Mr. George Kenneth Grant Henry, 

on Tuesday evening, August the twenty-first, 

nineteen hundred and six, 

at nine o'clock, 

St. Peter's Church, 

Washington, North Carolina. 



(From the Chapel Hill News of September 4th.) 
MRS. PATTIE LEWIS MANNING. 

Mrs. Manning, wife of Dr. Isaac H. Manning, died Monday, September 3d, at 11 
o'clock in the morning. She came to Chapel Hill, a bride, four months ago. This 
is the saddest event in the life of Chapel Hill for twenty-five years. Any death of 
the young is a sad thing. The sudden breaking of personal ties is full of distress. 

But there is a consideration in this case beyond the personal. The deeper, higher, 
finer life of the village has been struck. The highest product of modern life is a fine, 
Christian home. Happy the community that can boast of one or more beautiful, 
perfect, Christian homes. There is no influence for good in the world equal to it. 
The need of a college community for such homes is peculiar. 

Everybody was glad when Dr. Manning brought Pattie Lewis here to live among 
us always. Everyone felt that .the good tendencies in our life had been added to 
and strengthened. Simplicity, that mark of all high souls, abounded in her. She 
loved all that was true and good and beautiful. No sham, no pretense, no glitter 
found a place in her life. She was genuine, sincere, hearty all the time. 

"We shall not look upon her like again." 

Good friend, thy loss is our loss. Together we suffer. 

H. H. Williams. 



(From the News and Observer of September 6th. ) 

DEBNAM-HUTCHINGS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Celidon Hutchings 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their daughter, 

Julia Rankin, 

to 

Mr. Henry Debnam, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



on Wednesday morning the twelfth of September, 

at 11 o'clock, 

119 West Martin Street, 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 

At Home 

After November fifteenth, nineteen hundred and six, 

Iloilo, Philippines. 

Miss Hutchings is one of the younger Ealeigh women and is well known in this 

city and over a large part of the State. Many of her intimacies were formed at St. 

Mary's School, where she was a student. Mr. Debnam is a son of Mr. Thomas Deb- 

nam, of Suffolk, Va., and resided there until seven years ago, when he went to the 

Philippines with the hospital corps. More recently he has been appointed to the 

chief clerkship of the constabulary, under Colonel Taylor, which position he has 

filled with distinction and ability. 

Immediately after the marriage ceremony the young couple will leave the city for 
Richmond, Chicago and San Francisco. They will go by the steamer Korea to 
China and Japan, and thence to Iloilo, about 600 miles south of Manila. 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Peyton Moore 

request the honor of your 

presence at the marriage of their daughter, 

Addie Erwin, 

to 

Mr. John Bishop Bowen, 

on Thursday evening, the fourth of October, 

nineteen hundred and six, 

at eight o'clock, 

At Home, 

Yorkville, South Carolina. 



(From the News and Observer of October — .) 
CAMERON-MARSHALL. 

PROMINENT AND POPULAR YOUNG COUPLE WED AT CHRIST CHURCH 
YESTERDAY MORNING. 

The marriage of Miss Theodora Marshall, youngest daughter of Rev. M. M. Mar- 
shall, D. D., Rector of Christ Church, and Mr. Duncan H. Cameron was celebrated 
yesterday morning at 10:30 o'clock. 

The ceremony was marked by quiet elegance yet extreme simplicity. The chancel 
of the church was adorned with growing palms, which, together with a few lighted 
tapers burning in high candelabra on the 'altar and clusters of roses in the altar 
vases, formed the only decorations. 

The altar itself was vested in white and gold. 

The bride entered the church leaning on the arm of her brother, Mr. Joe K. 
Marshall. She wore a gown of embroidered Canton crepe which exceedingly enhanced 



26 The St. Mart's Muse. 



her slender figure. A white picture hat and a shower boquet of lilies of the valley 
completed this effective costume. 

She passed up the aisle with that easy and graceful dignity which has character- 
ized her lovely young womanhood, and no fairer bride has stood before the altar to 
receive the blessing of the Church in that solemn and holy rite. 

Her only attendant was her sister, Miss Margaret Susan Marshall, who immedi- 
ately preceded her. The groom was attended by his cousin, Commander Allen G. 
Rogers, U. S. Navy, who acted as best man. The beautiful ritual of the Episcopal 
Church was read with tender and impressive solemnity by the bride's father, and 
the vows were soon spoken that pronounced them man and wife. 

At the conclusion of the ceremony the organ pealed forth Mendelssohn's Wedding 
March, and to these joyous strains the wedding party left the chancel. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron will take a short honeymoon trip before leaving for the 
far East, their future home being in Canton, China, in which territory Mr. Cameron 
is general manager of the Standard Oil Company's large interests. He is the 
younger son of the late Gen. Francis H. Cameron, and a grandson of the late Hon. 
William H. Haywood. The good wishes of the entire community will follow these 
happy young people in their new life and across the seas to their new home, with 
the hope that all the voyage may be as fair as its beginning. 

The bride received many handsome presents, and among them some rare old 
jewels which had been worn by the groom's grandmother, heirlooms of priceless 
value because of such association. 

The ushers were Armistead Coward, Edgar Haywood, William A. Syme, George 
Little. 

DEATH OF MRS. HOWARD J. HERRICK. 

Williamstoh, N. C, Oct. 17. — Mrs. Delia Lamb Herrick, wife of Howard J. Herrick, 
died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson G. Lamb, Monday night, 
October 15, after an illness of six weeks. 

Mrs. Herrick was educated at St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. She was married Decem- 
ber 22, 1897, and lived in Richmond, Va., for five years, and afterwards in New York 
City. She was a member of the Richmond Chapters of the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution and the Daughters of the Confederacy. 

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Nathaniel Harding, of Washington, 
N. C, at the Church of the Advent, this morning at 11:30. 

. Mrs. Herrick was thirty years of age, and is survived by her husband and two 
children. She was a devoted daughter, wife and mother, and her untimely decease 
will be deeply mourned by her family and her wide circle of friends, both South and 
North. 



NASH-TAYLOR. 

PROMINENT AND POPULAR YOUNG COUPLE WED IN PITTSBORO YESTERDAY. 

Pittsboro, N. C, Oct. 18. — At the Episcopal church here, to-night, Miss Annie 
Mauger Taylor and Mr. Edmund Strudwick Nash were married, by the Rev. Hogue, 
of Wilmington. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



Among the relatives and friends from a distance at the marriage were Mrs. P. G. 
Snowden, of Jacksonville, Florida; Mrs. John H. Anderson and Miss Lucy London 
Anderson, of Fayetteville ; Mrs. Mary C. James, Misses Margaret Haughton, Mary, 
Margaret and Dorothy Nash, and Messrs. Henry London Taylor, Henry K. Nash, Jr., 
Burke Bridgers, Robert Nash and Benjamin Bell, Jr., of Wilmington; Misses Emily 
Taylor and Etta Haywood., of Raleigh; Miss Sarah Jones, of Asheville; Mr. E. L. 
Haughton, of Jones County, and Mr. Isaac S. London, of Durham and South Carolina 
Railroad. 

An entertainment was given the bridal party last night by Mr. and Mrs. H. A. 
London, and after the marriage a reception was given by Mrs. A. M. Haughton to 
the bridal party. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The MUSE generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



Hardship. 

When I lie down in my bed, 
It nearly makes me weep 

To think that I must close my eyes 
Before I go to sleep. 



Trouble. 



When I awaken in the morn, 

I'm sad, I must confess, 
To think that ere I can go out 

I must get up and dress. 

— The Philistine. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OP ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES FINE SHOES 525 SLIPPERS 



.Send to. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS I GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 

OF ALL KINDS 

SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 


W. C. STRONAGH'S SIS CO. 




GROCERS 




Heaters, the only perfect heater 
made. Write for prices. 


216 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 


DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 


You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 



Clippings. 

"Woman : the fairest work of the great Author ; the edition is large, 
and no man should be without a copy." 

"It's the little things that tell — especially the little brothers and 
sisters." 

"Everything comes to him who hustles while he waits." 

"The man who has nothing to boast of but his illustrious ancestors is 
like a potato — the only good belonging to him is underground." 

"Never judge a man's character by the umbrella he carries; it may 
not be his !" 

"Never put off till tomorrow a laugh that can be' laughed to-day." 



THE BOYLAN-PEARCE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear, 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N". C. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS BEADY. KO DIET OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 

121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



"Woman! she needs no eulogy — she speaks for herself." 

"A little beauty is a dangerous thing — 'specially if she's got a sweet 



voice. 



"A man who knows it all spends most of his time telling it." 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 

BARRETT & THOMPSON— Architects 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANTC 
Capital $15,000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
8600,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RA.LEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Promptness and Neatness with all work. 

Marshall & West, Props. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 
107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 






Advertisements. 



SAL VA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article, selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEBTHOEN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE), 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



There was a young lady named May- 
Who was perhaps just a bit gay : 

She went to the Fair 

And flirted while there. 
The train took her home the next day. 



A . D U GH I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H.STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, "Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 

ROBT. SIMPSON, Drugs ^ie^B, etc. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photogeapheb. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N". C. 

Capital, $225,000. Surplus and Profits, $115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timbeelake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire aDd Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Fob Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 

PESCULVS PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, - - $ 100,000.00 



Surplus, ■ 
Deposits, 



100,000.00 
1,000,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work suehas Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-W ANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy — China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



GEO. MARSH & CO., 

Wholesale Groceries. Produce, Fruit, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER i'OMPaNY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



m^t 



COFFEE 




Mi SES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIYERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No 79. 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D T. JOHNSON & SONS 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, I906-'0T. 



SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER. 

Sept. 20. — Advent Term formally opened. Address by Rev. S. L. Boat, of Durham. 

Sept. 25. — Regular routine work begun. 

Oct. 18.— State Fair Day. Holiday. 

Oct. 19. — Grand Concert. Madame Nordica. 

Oct. 27. — Sigma Lambda Society. Reception in honor of new members. 

Oct. 31. — Hallowe'en. Annual Celebration. 

Nov. 1. — All Saints' Day. Founders' Day. Holy Day. 

Nov. 3. — St. Anne's Chapter. Flower Tea, 

Nov. 17. — St. Etheldreda's Chapter. Annual Evening. 



SEABOARD 

air line: railway 



PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 
Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-W est. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Biimingham Memphis bayannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Boom Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
Sou t hern ^fnes rn pomts - Int - er ctiangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 

t^ e^V tin 3. e -<, ables > winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address pyv 



C. H. GATTIS, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



C. B. RYAN, 

General Passenger Agent, 

Portsmoath, Va. 



EDWARD P. COST, 

Second Vice-President, 

Portsmouth, Va. 



The Student Directory, 1906-'07. 



The St. Mary's Muse Staff. 



ANNUAL. 

(UDder direction of Senior Class.) 

Lillian Farmer, E'ditor.in-Ohief. 

Emily Carrison, Business Manager. 

Louise Hill, ") 

Mary Spruill, I Literary Editors. 

Helen Ball, 

Beatrice Cohen, J 

Sue Prince, ) 

Heber Rirdsong, v Art Editors. 

Alice McCullers, \ 



MONTHLY. 



(Under direction of Muse Club.) 



Managing 
Board. 



Serena Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 

Jessie Harris, Bus. Manager. 

Elizabeth Waddill. 

Helen Liddell. 

Helen Strange. J 

Lillian Farmer. Alice Moore. 

Emily Garrison. Georgia Hales. 

Mary Spruill. Louise Hill. 

Sue Prince. Mary Vann. 

Beatrice Cohen. Bessie Ivey. 



SIGMA LAMBDA. 



The Literary Societies. 

EPSILON ALPHA PI. 

I illinn Farmer - - President Sue Prince. 

Elizabeth WaddTlT"::" Vice-President Sarah Jones 

Or fee Ward Secretary Emily Carrison. 

Eva Ro-erson Treasurer Helen Liddell. 

Saliie H Battle Corresponding Secretary Serena Bailey. 

Louise Hill Critic Helen Strange. 

Frai kie SHf" " 1 Historian Alice Corbett. 

Annp «r,i 1 m ii J Katheri ne Henderson. 

KatTfiSlall } TellerS tEluise Robinson. 



The Auxiliary Chapters. 
General Directress Miss McKimmon. 



ST. CATHERINE'S. 

Miss Thomas, Directress. 
Louise Hill President. 
Jessie Harris, Treasurer. 
Emily Carrison, Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S. 

Miss Cribbs, Directress. 
Saliie Haywood Battle, President. 
Mabel Willi*, Vice-President. 
Matilda Haughton, Treasurer. 
Bettie Sturgeon, Secretary. 

ST. MONICA'S. 

Miss McKimmon, Directress. 
Elizabeth Waddill, President. 
Janie DuBose, Vice-President. 
Lvinan Grimsley. Treasurer. 
Ohevilette Kinloch, Secretary. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S. 

Mrs. Vincent, Directress. 

Susan Byuum, President. 

Alice Munnerlyn, Secretary-Treasurer. 



ST. ANNE'S. 

Miss Sutton, Directress 
Eva Rogerson, President 
Blanche Robinson, Vice-President. 
Mary Vann Tretsurer. 
Minnie Leary, Secretary. 

ST. ETHELDREBA'S 

Miss Spann, Directress. 

Sarah Jones, President. 

Katharine Henderson, Vice-President. 

Alice Corbett, Treasurer. 

Marguerite Short. Secretary. 



mte Health 



$m 



MAKY'S SCJHQOL 



RALEIGH, N, C. 



(for girls and young women). 



UAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 20, ; 1906. 



BHHHHHBHI^^^HBI H Hi 



Hon in these 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE, |B| 

\ -J. 77//-; MUSIC SCHOOL. 

l THE Alii SCHOOL. 

HH PREP A RA TOR Y SCHOOL, 



ii£iBflHHB^R||^H«3|9HB3^GHG 



Progressive Music Departm 

MftMo» PdiheJSoeialq 

fgue and other information at 




i(iiy*eighi 

; o/ Education without sUgkt 



Rev, McNeely DuBose, B. S, B. IX 

RECTOR, 




§ 



iriber 



^P 






Jfritftpcr. laoe 





*--■■■■ i- ■ 
-•..■..-.". : . 

TRalei 

■i '■-■:':■ ■ 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



HALLOWE'EN NUMBER. 



Vol. XI. November, 1906. No. 3. 



Do not talk of the decay of the year; the season is good when the people are so. 
It is the best time in the year for a painter; there is more variety of colors in the 
leaves; the prospects begin to open, through the thinner woods over the valleys, 
and through the high canopies of trees to the higher arch of heaven; the dews of 
the morning impearl every thorn and scatter diamonds on the verdant mantle of 
the earth; the forests are fresh and wholesome. What would you have? The 
moon shines, too, though not for lovers, these cold nights, but for astronomers.— 
Pope. 



The Headless Woman : A True Ghost Story. 



KATE m'0. BLACKBALL. 



Back, before the war brought ruin and desolation, Kittrell Springs 
was a grandly gay place. For those seeking pleasure or recreation there 
was then no mountains and no seashore, or rather there was no conve- 
nient way to get to either, which amounts to the same thing. Therefore 
large numbers came to Kittrell and a few other resorts in the hills of 
the State. The water was good, the scenery beautiful, the large park 
shady and cool, and the ball-room one of the best to be found. 

Only one thing threw the smallest shadow over the gay throng that 
came and went. That shadow came from a clump of trees. Now all 
clumps of trees throw shadows over people's heads ; this one threw them 
over their hearts. It was an extremely unkempt place, in which every 
imaginable kind of brush and vine and weed gathered and ran riot. 
Everybody felt that it was a graveyard, though no graves were to be 
seen merely in passing. It was so near the road, too, and the road which 
all must pass to reach the depot. It was such an evil spot that the 
gayest grew sober when going by it. A tradition, dim as the faint rows 
of mounds with their rough stones at each end, told a sad story about it. 
Of course there are sad stories connected with all graveyards, but this 
was sadder even than the common run, which are sad enough. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



This tradition told us that far back, almost when the white people 
first came to settle the neighborhood, all the surrounding lands had 
been the property of a widow. This widow, as widows sometimes will 
do, married again. Her husband ill-treated her, as husbands who 
marry widows for their belongings sometimes will. She bore his 
cruelty for y^ars rather than leave her children. But one by one they 
died. After she had laid the last one in the graveyard she said to her 
husband, "Take all that I have, but let me go." And leaving all, she 
departed, walked to her people, in Tennessee, carrying only a bag of 
clothing on her head. After this she was heard of no more. Her sole 
friend was a little white dog that went with her. The country people 
said that on the anniversary of the night on which she left — for it was 
in the night that her husband's cruelty had driven her to begin her long 
pilgrimage — she could be seen passing the old graveyard with her little 
white dog and carrying in her hand a Jack-o-Lantern. This always 
burst just opposite the graveyard, so as to enable her to get one more 
glimpse of the spot where her children lay, just as she gazed on it as 
she passed it that night for the last time in the flesh. 

But that was long, long ago, when the great oaks that darkened the 
place were mere whips. So we will leave it for good and come back to 
the gay ante-bellum times at the springs. 

One night, when the season was about over and the place getting lone- 
some, a gentleman had occasion to walk to the depot to catch a belated 
train. There was no moon — only such a glimmer of light as the stars 
give on cloudless nights. As he neared the graveyard there rose up 
between him and a small brook — it occurred to him that evil things 
never could cross running water — an immensely tall, headless woman, 
clad in spotless white, Avith a little white dog trotting by her side and 
a Jack-o-Lantern burning in her hand. By one of the heroic efforts of 
his life, he summoned all the courage that he had — moral, physical, and 
what-not — and pressed onward. Just opposite the graveyard the head- 
less woman swept by him, as noiselessly as a bat. And as she passed 
the Jack-o-Lantern burst with a bang and a roar. 

The gentleman knew that he had seen the forlorn ghost that annually 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



came all the way from Tennessee to get one glimpse, by the short flash 
cf the Jack-o-Lantem, of her children's graves. 

It transpired later that an humble laboring woman whose husband 
was in the Oxford jail had started that night to succor him, carrying 
her little white dog, her pipe, a tin bucket of food, and a large bag of 
white clothes on her head. But the gentleman was quite sure that it 
was not the living woman, but the ghost of the dead one that he saw. 
Readers of the Muse must take their choice. 



Their hjallowe'en Ghost. 



IRVING MORGAN. 



The last week of October had arrived and Farmer Brown was at his 
wits' end as to how he should dispose of a problem that had occupied 
his mind a great deal of the time since last Hallowe'en. 

Upon that memorable evening the harum-scarum boys and girls of the 
neighborhood had done considerable damage around his place, and he 
had been unable to administer any punishment because he could not 
catch and identify any of them. 

Though naturally an easy-going sort of man, at last the soul of Brown 
rebelled, and he vowed he would not endure the same aggravations and 
loss this fall that he had been subjected to the year before. 

"But what shall I do?" he thought. One plan after another had 
passed through his mind only to be rejected as unworthy, and he began 
to frown and shake his head in discouragement. 

"Doggone it all! I'll give it up!" he said. "Maybe the boys can 
think of something," so making his way to the woodshed, he consulted 
his two sons, Jack and ]STed. 

Friday night came at last, bringing with it a somewhat cloudy sky 
and a strong wind, which conditions suited Jack and ISTed perfectly, 
for they had a scheme which would work so much the better on a dark 
night. At precisely ten o'clock the two boys took their station in the 
top of the granary, while their cousin hid himself among the shadows 
in the heart of a huge oak, a short distance away. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



They were barely concealed and ready when footsteps were heard 
approaching very cautiously. Peering out through a knothole Jack 
counted them: One, two, three, four, as they came from among the 
shadows. "Humph ! a small crowd," said Jack inwardly." But Harry 
Stedman is with them, and I've heard him boast many a time that he is 
afraid of nothing. Now, we shall see if he is courageous, or if his 
bravery is all a bluff, as I am inclined to believe it is." Nearer and 
nearer they drew, snickering and whispering among themselves. "Let 
them walk a few minutes, Ned, and see what they will do," said Jack ; 
so the brothers watched them as they cut up numerous capers, and at 
last proceeded to the barn-yard, where the young stock was gathered 
for the night. 

Producing a heavy rope, they proceeded to tie it around the horns 
and head of one calf and leading it close to another, to tie the two 
together. The boys did not know what else they intended doing, for 
Jack gave the word, "All ready, Ned," and suddenly the culprits heard 
a slight noise, and thinking some one might possibly be on the watch, 
they looked up in time to see a door open in the side of the granary, and 
a woman in white come forth. She seemed to walk slowly and hesi- 
tatingly toward the barn. The culprits looked on in silence and horror. 
What could it be, walking on air, midway between earth and sky ! 
"Ghosts !" said Harry Stedman, hoarsely. "Let's try to get away." 
"Nonsense," said another, "we'll wait and see what it does." 
So they waited, with faces white, limbs trembling, and hearts beating- 
like trip-hammers. Nearer and nearer it came. Surely it was coming 
right for them. Soon they could hear a slight rustling sound as it 
moved, and with one arm partly upraised it swayed backward and for- 
ward in the air, its long white robes blowing in the wind. Suddenly, 
as the boys stood there fascinated by this strange, huge being in the 
shape of a woman, the other arm was raised, and with one grand, for- 
ward swoop it seemed to settle directly in front of Harry Stedman, and 
hold out its arms as if to embrace him. It was but a few inches from 
his face when, with the yell of a Comanche Lndian, he bounded back- 
ward, leaped the fence and flew like the wind down the road, the other 
boys following close at his heels. The air was filled with the most 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



hideous cries, loud weird, uncanny howls, and long wailings as of lost 
souls. The figure in white dropped limply to the ground when the boys 
had disappeared. 

"It worked fine, didn't it, Jack ?" said ISTed, as they once more stood 
on terra firma. 

"Yes, and now we know just how brave Harry Stedman is," returned 
Jack, and they laughed gleefully as they recalled the look of horror on 
Harry's face when the ghost started to embrace him. 

Many were the comments made next day, and for a long time after, 
about the ghost that inhabited Brown's granary. 

One of the neighbors came out and asked him if he did not live in 
fear, knowing the place was haunted. 

"Well," said Brown, "maybe 'tis a ghost as lives there. I have heard 
some mighty queer sounds there o' nights, and you know, neighbor, 
Mirancly Jenkins was drowned in the creek down thar just a leetle below 
my house. Might be as her spirit returned ; can't always tell." And 
the farmer told this with a worried look on his face, not by the least 
sign betraying the boys or allowing anybody to find out what a struggle 
they had had making that ghost, and getting the wires just right, so that 
they would work them from the granary and the big oak near the yard, 
thus making their ghost rise high in the air or sink low, go forward or 
backward, etc. The terrible noises were made by bottles placed in the 
top of the granary where the wind would whistle through them, and 
with "screech owls" made out of tin cans. But if it was a great deal of 
work, the boys proudly called their ghost a "howling success," for not 
one of their neighbors can be induced to set foot on Brown's place 
after dark. 



The Falling of the Leaves. 



MARY E. SPANN. 



Now the autumn leaves are falling, 
On the ground they thickly lie, 

And the branches, bare and leafless, 
Stretch like lacework 'gainst the sky. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



And the leaves of life are falling 
By our pathway one by one — 

Hopes and loves and longings, ever 
Dear to us, are quickly done. 

Is it true, God, my Father, 
That the blessings Thou dost send, 

Rise like sunlight to their zenith, 
And then all in darkness end? 

Leaves so dear to us in springtime, 
And in summer's day so bright, 

Is the rule of life, my Father, 
That they pass at eve to night? 

Strange the half of all life's music 

Is the echo of its pain, 
And the rainbow only shineth 

In the heavens after rain. 



The Little h]arp Girl. 



RUTH VERNON NEWBOLD. 



She was not beautiful, this little harp girl. She had something more 
than beauty; it was love for the lonely children that lived near her 
home. She did not remember ever having seen her father and mother. 
She came one night to the kind, lonely old man and woman who lived 
in the valley near the beautiful blue lake. It was storming the night 
she came to her foster parents, the clouds were black, so dark that they 
hid the face of the pearly moon which would have smiled on her had 
they been more kind. She came with her harp clasped tight in her cold, 
trembling little hands. Her eyes were dark and dreamy, and the wav- 
ing, misty hair hung around the small star white face, down over the 
little bare shoulders, making her look more, if possible, like the child of 
night. ~No one would have guessed of the love and tenderness hidden 
in the breast of this wee fairy-like form. 

She one day surprised her foster parents by saying the fairies had 
sent her to the children of the valley, that she might teach them to love 
the flowers and birds, might teach them to love and forgive. Every day 



The St. Mary's Mtjse. 



she would take her harp and hide herself away from the world, but 
always taking the children with her. There they would sit for hours 
by the beautiful blue lake, making wreaths of the wild flowers and 
throwing them into the foaming water for the little mermaids to find 
when they came at night to sing love songs to the moon and stars. There 
"Our Eosemond" (that is what the children called her), would sing 
them songs of the fairies and mermaids who danced on the ripples of the 
lake in the soft, misty moonlight ; all the while she played wild, melan- 
choly accompaniments on her harp. 

The music, so soft and sweet, sounded to the listening children like 
the wind that sang them to sleep at night, when they were tucked up 
warm and cozy in their little beds. Thus sweet Eosemond, child of the 
fairies, cared for the children she loved so well. 

All now lingered to look again at the face of this child-woman with 
her wonderful eyes and the tender mouth. Only one look was enough 
to see the pure, loving soul that could but shine through and show itself. 
Just as the rosy light of morn shines through the dark misty curtain of 
night, so with the soul of Eosemond. How they loved her, these 
children of the valley, with a love stronger than a lover's, more tender 
than a mother's love. No one could take their Eosemond from them. 

But one day, as they were making merry in the cave by the calm, blue 
lake, a shadow fell across the summer sky, leaving the hearts of Eose- 
mond's darlings full of fierce and bitter hate at the one who should have 
dared to sadden the heart of their beloved. Was she not theirs ? She 
herself had often said, with her own dear eyes full of love, that the 
fairies had sent her to them, to make them happy and turn their little 
sorrows into laughing joy again. The handsome Prince of that country 
stopped beside the lake to rest himself after a long day's journey, throw- 
ing himself on the ground to dream of the little golden-haired girl he 
loved. His horse, with the flashing eyes, grazed on the grass a few 
yards away. While dreaming', the Prince thought he heard music ; at 
first the sound was like the wind sobbing about the pine trees as it does 
in summer, and he could hardly believe his ears when he heard the 
sweet soulful voice of a. woman singing near the lake. Going to a cave 
and looking through the crevice of the rock, he saw the children listen- 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



ing with upturned faces at their Eosemond as she sang the wild sea 
songs that tell of life, of freedom and of love. 

Now the Prince had ever had his way, and I am afraid he was just 
a wee bit willful, but we must excuse the faults of princes, poor fellows ; 
they are always made to believe what they do is right, and therefore miss 
the delightful sensation that one has when one is told that he is wrong. 

So the Prince stepped into the cave and frightened the children, who 
clung to their Eosemond as though they thought this smiling man was a 
monster or demon who had come for no purpose but to take away their 
darling. But the Prince assured them that he only wanted to stay and 
listen to the music ; and Eosemond, wanting only to give happiness, sang 
all of her songs to the admiring Prince. The children looked at one 
another after she had finished, wondering why their Eosemond had 
never sung so sweetly to them, but the little harp-girl, with the beautiful 
eyes of the Prince fixed upon her, seemed as one inspired. He looked 
as though he were in a dream and could hardly believe this angel-like 
woman, with her wonderful eyes, was real. This woman whom he, 
seeing for the first time, loved with a passion new to him, loved with all 
the strength his heart and soul could know. Still he dared not speak of 
love to one so childlike and innocent, dared not ask her to be his wife ; 
it would frighten her and she would banish him from her forever. 

But what if Eosemond loved him ? Nursing this thought the Prince 
had no rest day or night until he had told her of his love. And Eose- 
mond, listening with a face as white as the lilies that grew in the valley, 
and eyes half scared, half pitying, could only say, as he finished his 
story, could only say in answer, "You are brave, oh Prince, but I do not 
love you — and I could never leave the children of the valley." And the 
Prince, looking into the sad eyes of the little harp-girl, knew that never 
prayers, words, or tears could change her. 

Eising, with his face full of anger and despair, with the words, "Then 
you shall die for the pain you cause me, and die by my hands, I who 
would give my life for yours." He took the dagger from his belt and 
plunged it into the little harp-girl's breast. Snatching one kiss from 
the dying girl's white lips, he threw himself into the lake and sank be- 
neath the dancing foam. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 



Eosemond, with eyes full of horror, yet tender and loving, staggered 
to the side of her children and sank at their feet. The warm, crimson 
blood that flowed from her breast fell to the ground by her side, and 
from it a rose-tree with roses of deepest crimson sprang. But the fairies 
came to the aid of the dying Eosemond ; taking the roses, they made a 
bier and bore her away to fairyland, from whence she came. And who 
knows ? Perhaps Eosemond and the Prince were joined together in 
the land of fairies, and perhaps Eosemond forgave him and learned to 
love him. Let us hope so, and let us hope they had more happiness than 
this world of care and pain could give them. 

Travelers now passing the rose-tree by the blue lake with its dancing 
foam, say they hear music from the waving boughs, like the sound of a 
harp — faintly calling "Eosemond — Eosemond." Is it so, or is it the 
wind about the trees sobbing for the loved and lost ? Who can tell ? 



Sketches. 



THE BON OR FESTIVAL OF THE DEAD. 
(A pagan expression of the thought of the Christian All Saints Day.) 

There is in Japan an old and fast dying custom known as the Bon or 
Festival of the Dead. 

Once every year, after solemn religious services in memory of their 
dead, a vast multitude passes at night to the shore of the ocean. Each 
person carries a tiny boat, lighted by a colored lantern and laden with 
some gift and a letter bearing some message of love or some prayer for 
forgiveness to the loved one that has passed away. 

At midnight the little vessels are launched upon the deep, and they 
pass outward at the mercy of wind and wave. 

Farther and farther apart they drift, and the myriads of colored 
lights like quivering stars, one by one, go out as the little boat proves 
too frail for the roughness of the waters. 

How full of meaning to us is this old ritual ! How it teaches us to 
remember the loving deed and to leave the bitter word unspoken ere the 
life-boats about us push off and the lights go out in the darkness of the 
distant waters. ]\/[. ji] g. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Judge James Wilson. 



There are many incidents of historic interest and importance con- 
nected with our little town of Edenton, and of that one which is most 
in the public mind at present, I wish to speak. 

At Hayes, near Edenton, one of the great men of our country, Judge 
James Wilson, is buried. He died there August 28, 1798, while on a 
visit to his friend, Judge Iredell. 

Judge Wilson was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a 
member of Congress from Pennsylvania, and was appointed by Wash- 
ington to be a Justice of the Supreme Court, Also he was the founder 
of the Law School of Pennsylvania. 

It may be interesting to know that he is one of the principal charac- 
ters in Dr. Weir Mitchell's novel, "Hugh Wynn," and is one of the five 
full figures painted by Trumbull in his famous picture, "The Signing 
of the Declaration." 

It is said that he came to Edenton to get away from his business 
cares, and it is known that he visited Judge Iredell on several occasions. 

Now, one hundred years after his death, people have realized what 
honor is due -him. On the 20th of November the State of Pennsylvania 
is going to have his remains taken to Philadelphia, where they will be 
received with the highest civic and military honors. He is to be 
buried there at Christ Church, where so many distinguished men of the 
Eevolution and early days of the government rest, and surely Judge 
Wilson's place is among these. Annie E. Wood. 






In Lighter Vein. 



J. C. — "I think its a shame that Mr. C. killed that cat and dog! 
He's a regular cannibal !" 

K. H. — "Have you seen the tribulations to the "Muse ?" 

Junior, reading her composition. — "Coleridge tramped through 
Whales/' 

K. Henderson to S. Bailey — "What are you sighing about ?" "Oh, 
it's just psychology." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

A. H., writing to her mother — "Mamma, don't write until you get 
this." 

Mr. Stone, in History Class — "Adams and Jefferson, the two great 
political opponents, died on the same day. 
K. Henderson — "I wonder if they knew it." 

First girl — "Why don't the faculty have their recital ?" 
Second girl — "They are waiting for Miss Hull's bow to come." 
First girl — "Well, I don't see why the whole music faculty should 
have to wait on one man !" 

Miss Spurlock, in psychology — "There is one school of philosophers 
that believes there is nothing material in the outside world, that the 
object is in our own minds instead ; for instance, trees are not really on 
the campus, but merely in our brains." 

B. C. — "Well, I know the laundry's real." 



BreaK ! Brea^! BreakJ 



Break ! break ! break ! 

0! what is the matter with me? 
I don't remember what figure this is, 

And where can my partner be? 

O, well for the leading man, 

He can shout until he turns gray, 
But everyone else is talking so loud, 

They won't hear a word he may say. 

The other couples go on, 

And seem to know what to do; 
But, oh! for some kind friend to tell me 

If this is break one or two. 

Break ! break ! break ! 

That german haunts me yet. 
For in each life are some moments 

Too awful to forget! 

M. duB. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = s = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. C. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Serena C. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. Beatrice Bollman Cohen, Acting Business Manager. 

Sue Brent Price, Elizabeth Waddill. Helen Strange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Lodise Hill. 



EDITORIAL. 



Thanks- 
giving 



How many Thanksgiving days we have spent in a very 
different manner from this one ! Most of us are think- 
ing of home and the little reunion of relatives and friends 
which we associate with this festival. In our minds' eye we see the 
family circle and the happy events that occupy them during each hour 
of the holiday. We cannot he there, of course, hut we can try to enjoy 
the day to the fullest extent ; it will prove much more pleasant than we 
could "believe possible. Then, too, we should do as the infallible Ladies' 
Home Journal suggests and "Keep our mouths turned up in the cor- 
ners." Each of us has much to be thankful for; many of us, as Buster 
Brown says, "Never realize just how comfortable or happy we are until 
the toothache or some other thing comes along to put us out of busi- 
ness" — and, as usual, Buster is right. 



There is an "evanescent, intangible" something which we 
School Spirit, m { &B [ n gt. Mary's girls. It seems to us that "school 

spirit" best expresses this idea; so many of us do not 
seem to have much of the right sort of school pride. Of course we all 
love St. Mary's ; it is unnecessary to say that. The best kind of love, 
however, shows itself in deeds, not words; it rests with us to encourage 



The St. Mart's Muse. 13 

enthusiasm in athletic and literary societies and in class organizations. 
Do not put the responsibility on the faculty, for we would not wish 
them to take the initiative, although they are willing to help us. Then, 
too, perhaps, it's our privilege more than theirs, girls, to create the right 
sort of St. Mary's spirit. 

Perhaps it is a truism that genius often goes unappre- 
Judge Wilson, ciated until the person to whom it is given has left us; as 

Carlyle expresses it, "In spite of our grand maxim of 
supply and demand, it is no means the highest excellence that men are 
most forward to recognize." We see another example of this in the life 
of Judge Wilson. Although one of the most brilliant men of his time — ■ 
indeed far in advance of it — his body was suffered to lie in an obscure 
grave for over a hundred years. At last he is to be given the tardy 
demonstration of reverence and honor which so long have been denied 
him. In the hearts of his patriotic countrymen and students of history, 
however, he has long been, and will always be, enshrined as a great- 
hearted, loyal American. 

The Muse Club has grown larger of late, and we hope 
The Muse. ^hat the members will prove themselves as interested and 

energetic as we believe them to be. They are capable of 
making the Muse what we wish it — a thoroughly up-to-date school 
paper. Enthusiasm is needed in every one, and those who are not will- 
ing to give the best of their ability and support are lacking in the right 
sort of school spirit. On the other hand, we trust that each one will 
lend her individual aid, so that we may have a magazine worthy of 
St. Mary's. 

Athletics, which should form an important and interest- 
Athletics. i n g feature in every school, does not seem to be pursued 

with much heartiness this year. Little seems to have been 
done about the formation of athletic clubs. Why this is so we cannot 
tell. Certainly there are numbers of girls who are enthusiastic about 
tennis and basket-ball ; it seems a pity that they do not try to encourage 



14 The St. ]\Iaey's Muse. 

such enthusiasm in the rest of the school. We hope that those who are 
interested will aid in the creation of a general interest and love for the 
various out-door sports. 

One of the most pleasant features connected with the pub- 

lication of a school periodical is the coming of the "ex- 
change Idea. ~, . 

changes."' Each month they come like old friends drop- 
ping in for a little chat, talking over. — sometimes directly, sometimes by 
inference;, — their troubles and pleasures for friendship's sake. Some 
in apparent feebleness seem to need our encouragement and help ; some 
in their strength we think of as partners in a common work, and greet, 
as we hope to be greeted, with brotherly sympathy and criticism : to 
others, the university "grown-ups," we look for help and advice. 

The suggestions of the High School This-or-that to the University 
Magazine to do or not to do this or that savors somewhat more of humor 
than some of the Joke Columns we run across ; while the command of the 
Exchange Editor of the College What-not, drawing its material from a 
student-body five hundred strong to its weaker contemporary with only 
one-fifth the number of supporters and whose editors have to keep busy 
day in and day out from month to month in order to have any issue at 
all. to '"be a little more serious" or "a little more witty," to give us 
"more poetry"' or "better stories, " or "cease disgracing the business" 
(this last merely by suggestion | is to say the least not especially en- 
couraging. It is a sign of the times and an encouraging one that the 
exchange-criticism seems to be growing more and more constructive, less 
destructive. Undeserved praise discredits both the praiser and the 
praised, but silence is far better than the criticism that wounds without 
stimulating. 

TTe presume that each publication is doing its best, — the editors owe 
that to their school, their student-body, and themselves. If that best is 
not quite what we would like to see. we prefer to try to help by indirect 
suggestion and example rather than advice undesired, if not undeserved. 

In the formation of the College Press Association of South Carolina, 
in which the Clemson College Chronicle took the initiative; and the 
institution of the Southern Inter-Collegiate Short Story Contest, at the 
suggestion of the University of Xorth Carolina Magazine, the first active 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 

steps toward formal co-operation among the school publications in the 
South are to be seen. We notice these moves with interest and trust 
that they will not only be in themselves successful, but that they will 
lead to other and equally helpful steps in future. 

We wish at this time to express our pleasure at greeting and our 
appreciation of the following friends that have thus far reached The 
Muse this session : The University of North Carolina Magazine, Wake 
Forest Student, Randolph-Macon Monthly, Red and White, Georgia 
Tech, Winthrop College Journal, Converse Concept, Palmetto, Oracle, 
Horner Cadet, Quill, Limestone Star, and Park School Gazette. We 
hope to receive many others in the near future. 

In particular would we congratulate the staff of The Palmetto on 
their first number of the year. The cover strikes us first, and it is a 
real pleasure to find the contents equally good. The Editorials and the 
Exchange Departments are both well worthy of the close notice of other 
editors. May The Palmetto never fall below the standard of the No- 
vember number. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



The Sigma Lambda Receptior). 

On Saturday evening, October 27th, the Sigma Lambda Literary So- 
ciety gave its annual reception to the new members. The French room 
was almost unrecognizable in its decorations of bamboo, autumn leaves 
and pennants. Purple and Gray, the society colors, were hung around 
the walls. In the hall stood the receiving committee, Misses Prince, 
Jones, Carrison, Bailey, Corbett, Liddell, Strange, Eobinson and Hen- 
derson, the officers of the society. Misses Bynum and Short presided 
over the punch bowls. The guests began to arrive shortly after eight 
o'clock and there was a steady stream of welcome visitors until ten. 
Besides the old and new Sigma Lambdas, there were present the faculty 
and the members of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society. Delicious 
fruit salad was served during the evening. Everybody seemed to have 
a good time. The president was most gracious in her cordial welcome 
to the new members, and the old girls eagerly followed her hospitable 
example. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



hjallowe'eo at St. Mary's, 

Eight o'clock. It was almost here, and in the parlor all were eagerly 
watching the door. Promptly at eight it opened and in walked a China- 
man. Following him were Pocahontas and a Japanese girl, and behind 
them were ghosts and goblins, clowns and dominoes, and more maidens 
from Pair Japan. Our attention is first called to the bishop and the 
priest walking with stately mien as becomes their dignity. But they 
have passed us and now we see "Jack and Jill," faithfully carrying 
their pail ; "Little Bo-Peep and Little Boy Blue" ; "Romeo and Juliet" ; 
"Two Knights of Ye Olden Time" ; little girls and Colonial Dames ; 
mammies with "nigger chillen" ; and others too numerous to mention. 

All of these marched around three times, and the couples were just 
forming for the first figure when suddenly the rattling of chains was 
heard and, to the terror and amazement of all, two convicts jumped 
through the window. With the penitentiary stripes, caps and chains, 
together with their masked faces, they frightened us very much at first. 
They soon mingled with the dancers, and whom did we see dancing 
together but the meek little nun and a convict. 

About nine, refreshments were served. Soon after, the lights were 
put out and the lantern figure was danced. With only the weird light 
of the lanterns the figures moving to and fro, many of them in white, 
made a very ghostly looking spectacle. Half-past nine came all too 
soon. Bidding our friends good-night, we went upstairs, everybody try- 
ing to say at the same time, "Oh ! what a good time I had ; I do hope 
we'll have another Masquerade Ball next Hallowe'en." Gr. S. H. 

St. Aooe's Flower Tea 

The Flower Tea given by St. Anne's Chapter of the Junior Auxil- 
iary, on the night of Saturday, November 3, was a great success. 

Those who looked through the open door of the parlor could not re- 
sist the scene within. 

The room was prettily decorated with autumn leaves, chrysanthe- 
mums and other late flowers. On the stage were arranged tables for 
those who wished ice cream. Girls dressed as jonquils, roses, poppies 
and other flowers served refreshments. 

We had "suitors galore," mostly "A. & M'ers." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 

Every one seemed to enjoy the evening, and the girls of Miss Sutton's 
dormitory should be congratulated on the successful carrying out of 
their original scheme. M. I. E. 



School Notes. 



— The D. Science Class, under Miss Spurlock's direction, have had 
interesting trips during the month to the Gas Works and the Ice Fac- 
tory. They are now planning an expedition to — But any member 
of the class will be glad to tell you. Ask Miss Hales, 

— Miss Amy Fitz-Simons, of South Carolina, a St. Mary's girl of 
'03 and '04, has been visiting Miss DuBose and renewing old acquaint- 
ances. 

— Gertrude Sullivan, '06, paid her friends at St. Mary's a visit in the 
week of the 20th. It was very good to have her back. 

— The orchestra is rapidly getting into shape under Miss Hull's guid- 
ance, and we are looking forward to hearing it in recital in the near 
future. 

— Twice during the past month the Sunday morning sermon has 
been by a visiting clergyman. On October 28th, in the absence of the 
Rector at Asheville, Rev. A. B. Hunter, of St. Augustine's, had the ser- 
vice; and on November 11th, Rev. W. J. Moody, General Missionary 
of the Diocese of Alabama, who was on a visit to his daughter, Doris, 
preached. We were very glad to have with us and hear both Mr. Hun- 
ter and Mr. Moody, and hope that they will repeat their visits. 

— On the evening of Saturday, the 10th, a party from St. Mary's 
enjoyed the lecture at the Baptist University by Mr. McEntee, of the 
Ben Greet Players, on "The Morality Play and 'Everyman.' " This 
lecture, as well as the special instruction, made the presentation of 
"Everyman" much more readily appreciated. 

— Thursday night, the 16th, Dr. Henry Shepherd, of Baltimore, lec- 
tured at the Baptist University under the auspices of the Woman's Club. 
Miss Poole chaperoned a party from St, Mary's, who greatly enjoyed 
Dr. Shepherd's discussion of "Shakespeare." 



18 The St. Mart's Muse. 



—A distinguished party of Northern Churchmen, members of the 
American Church Institute, which has general supervision of the work 
at St. Augustine's School for Negroes, paid an annual visit to Raleigh 
on October 30th on a tour of inspection of St. Augustine's School. Pi- 
loted by Bishop Cheshire and Mr. Hunter, they were with us at the 
morning Chapel Service, to our great pleasure. In the party, among 
others, were Bishop Greer, of New York, and Bishop Lines, of Newark, 
and Mr. Silas McBee, of The Churchman, Capt. A. T. Mahan, and 
Rev. Mr. Bishop. Mr. Stone was very glad to meet again Rev. Prescott 
Evarts, of Boston, a classmate at Harvard, and Mary Bryan's friends of 
last year were glad to meet her father, Rev. Dr. Bryan, of Petersburg. 
We were all sorry not to see Mr. Geo. Foster Peabody and Mr. Hamilton 
Mabie, who were to have been with the party, but were unable to come. 

— Work on the Auditorium proceeds slowly. At the present rate of 
progress it looks as if we might possibly hope to hear the Commencement 
address in the new building. 

— On account of illness, Jessie Harris has gone to her home at Hen- 
derson for a short stay. 

— Coatsie Benedict spent a few days of this month with relatives at 
Wake Forest, 

— Annie Glenn returned to her home in Greensboro at the end of the 
first quarter. 

— Nell Wilson spent a few days with relatives at Chapel Hill this 
month. 

— Nannie Campbell spent a few days with her parents at Fayetteville 
this month. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Eenest Crthk-sttan k- - _=. -^^Mumnse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. M T Leak, Durham. 
VirF-PRTmnifNTi! J Mrs - 1 M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 

VICE PRESIDENTS, -j Mrg p p Tucker Ra l e igh, 

L Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



The Saunders Memorial Window. 



Through the appeal in the October Muse, and the letter which has 
been mailed to friends of Miss Saunders whose addresses we can ascer- 
tain, a definite effort has been made to raise the Memorial Fund at once. 

The window, which will be of Tiffany glass, will be the work of Miss 
Julia Wickham, the artist who executed the Battle memorial window in 
the Chapel, and will harmonize with that window, which is directly 
opposite the place of the Saunders' window. 

A little less than $100 is still needed. In the hope that it may thus 
reach some interested persons who have not yet seen it, and may arouse 
others to action who have not yet acted, the letter of November 1 is here 
reproduced. It will serve also to call the minds of the daughters of St. 
Mary's to Founder's Day. 

Raleigh, N. C, November 1, 1906. 

To-day, the Feast of All Saints, is, as you doubtless remember, also observed at 
St. Mary's as "Founders' Day," and on it our thoughts, as daughters of St. Mary's, 
are centered on those noble souls who in the last three generations have o-iven of 
themselves to make St. Mary's what it is. 

It seems, then, the most appropriate season to invite your attention to an object 
in which we believe you will be interested and which is intended to commemorate 
her who was one of the saints, doing her life-work here, and who has since the last 
"Founders' Day" passed from us to her reward — Miss Anne Saunders. 

A memorial window to Miss Saunders will be placed near her old seat in the 
school Chapel, and The Muse is acting as steward for her friends who will make 
the placing of the window possible by their love-offerings. This letter is merely 
to invoke your interest in the matter, to ask you to mention it to any of our friends 
who may wish to have a part in the memorial and to urge that whatever is done 
will be done at once, and there is consequently need of immediate action by any one 
who would have a part. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Contributions may be sent to The St. Mary's Muse, and will be acknowledged 
immediately. 

Thanking you for the co-operation which we are sure you will give us in the 
matter, 

Very sincerely, St. Maey's Muse. 



November Weddings. 



Bellamy-Clark.- 

Tarboro, 1ST. C, 'Nov. 14. — At 5 :30 o'clock this afternoon one of tbe 
prettiest marriages ever solemnized here was witnessed in Calvary 
Church by an immense throng of people, the contracting parties being 
Miss Sue Clark, a popular and attractive young lady of this place, anc 
Mr. Marsden Bellamy, Jr., a prominent young member of the Wilming- 
ton Bar. The beautiful marriage ceremony of the Episcopal Church 
was impressively performed by Rev. F. H. Harding, Miss Sue Curtis 
skilfully rendering the wedding marches. Prior to the entrance of the 
bridal party the choir sang, "The Voice That Breathed Over Eden." 

The bridesmaids entered by twos in the following order : Misses Rena 
Clark, of Tarboro, and Carrie Darden, of ISTewsoms, Va. ; Alice Borden, 
of Wilmington, and Mary Howard, of Tarboro ; May Tayloe, of Wash- 
ington, 1ST. C, and Miss Gottlieb, of Baltimore; Duncan Winston, of 
Edenton, and Miss Darden, of jSTewsoms, Va. 

The bridesmaid's attire was white dotted net over taffeta. They car- 
ried large bunches of yellow chrysanthemums, tied with white tulle. 
Miss ISTan Clark, maid of honor, wore yellow crepe and carried white 
chrysanthemums. 

The bride entered the church with her father, Mr. W. S. Clark, who 
gave her away. She was attired in white chiffon cloth trimmed in real 
lace, wearing tulle veil, caught up with a wreath of orange blossoms, 
carrying a shower bouquet of bride's roses and lilies of the valley. 

Immediately after the ceremony a reception was given at the home of 
the bride. They left for a tour of Northern cities, and upon their 
return will reside at Wilmington. 

The church was beautifully decorated with palms and candles and 
presented an inspiring spectacle. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 21 

Mr. and Mrs. Marmaduke James Hawkins 

request the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Janet McKenzie 

to 

Mr. Milo M. Pendleton 

on the afternoon of Wednesday the twenty-first of jSTovember 

nineteen hundred and six 

at half after two o'clock 

"Oakley Hall" 

Ridgeway, jSTorth Carolina 



Crowell-Crow. 

At the Presbyterian Church at half-past ten o'clock, on the morning 
of Wednesday, JSTovember 21, will occur the marriage of Miss Mar- 
guerite Crow to Mr. C. B. Crowell. 

Miss Crow is one of Raleigh's brightest and most popular young 
women. Mr. Crowell is of the firm of the King-Crowell Drug Com- 
pany, and during the years he has lived in Raleigh has gained the 
esteem and high regard of all who have known him. 

There are no cards, as the ceremony will be a quiet one. 



Alumnae Notes. 



— Mrs. Iredell, after a brief visit in Asheville, is spending a month 
with Miss Czarnomska in Cincinnati. It is the first trip she has been 
able to take since Dr. Hines' illness, a year ago. 

— The special alunmse number of the Muse — Founders' Day num- 
ber — should reach its friends within a week of the arrival of this num- 
ber. We hope it will inspire them to furnish us the material for future 
numbers. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 






It is a pleasure to the editors to hear further from Miss Kimberly, 

who writes from Norfolk on October 25 th : 

419 Bute St. 

Dear Girls :— I hope that all of you girls fully enjoyed your vacation and have 
returned with new interest and well-rested for the next year's studies. Ah! how 
well I remember the close and beginning of school. The good-byes and many tears 
shed when our friends left us and the joyful welcome again on their return, and 
our great curiosity and excitement over the newcomers. I spent many of my 
vacations— though not all— at the school, and we girls always had much to amuse us 
and give us pleasure. Peyster, our housekeeper, was a good old soul, and Dr. 
Smedes was not so strict in vacation days: we would leave the grounds and go 
where we pleased during the day, but of course were obliged to be at the school 
before night. We would have lots of fun amongst ourselves, and I pity the girl 
who knows nothing of boarding-school life. * * * 

With good wishes for one and all, Emily S. Kimberly. 

We doubt not that in the years to come we shall look back at the scene 
of our school-days with as keen pleasure as many of the girls of ante- 
bellum days do now, and nothing seems to blot out time more com- 
pletely than the little glimpses at the familiar scenes in the days that 
are gone. 

To Kate. 



Of all the girls I love the best 

In this or any State, 
One friend stands out from all the rest — 

My pretty blue-eyed Kate. 

Others may be as dear to you, 

On whom you meditate — 
But no sweeter girl I ever knew 

Than pretty blue-eyed Kate. 

If asked in earnestness or mirth, 

If asked at morn or late, 
I'd say the dearest girl on earth 

Is my sweet blue-eyed Kate. 

A. C. G. 



READ !— MARK, I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



COLLEGE CUT-UPS. 

Last week Tuesday Gentle Jane 

Met a passing railroad train; 

"Good afternoon," she sweetly said, 

But the blamed train simply cut her dead. 

— Yale Record. 

Eugene was caught between two trains; 

Folk with a bag picked up the remains; 

The neighbors were greatly stirred up by the scene, 

And the only collected person was 'Gene. 

- — The Princeton Tiger. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OE ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LAMES EEN"E SHOES WTO SEIPPERS 



...Send to... 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W, C. STEM'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 






216 FAYETTBVILLE STREET 



KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Eayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll And up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 



IN THE ORIENT. 

If a game of baseball 

Should be held in Japan, 
Would a spectator there 

Be a Japanese fan? 
I've no doubt the effect 

On the eyes would be pleasant 
If only each foul 

Were a Japanese pheasant. 

— Cornell Widow. 



OH! THUNDER. 



"See!" said Willie, "see the clouds; 

Where are they going, I wonder?" 
K Well," said the captain, "since you ask, 

I think they are going to thunder." 

— Cornell Widow. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 



M. ROSENTHAL 

s co. 



GROCERS 



136 EAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESK), 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Ciarles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVEETHOEN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE), 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING. 

Some time ago four college boys went gaily forth one night to serenade two belles 
of Princeton. Arrived at the house of the fair ones, they took their stand under the 
correct window, as they thought, and for some time made the night more or less 
melodious. 

They were just preparing to leave when a door opened and the jolly old father 
of the girls appeared. Had it been light they might possibly have seen a twinkle 
in his eye. 

"Boys," he said, "we are much obliged. That is, I am much obliged, for I happen 
to be alone to-night. I'm sorry to say that the family's in New York. But I thank 
you for coming. Maybe if you come again you will have better luck. But in the 
name of old Princeton, boys, if you do come when the girls are here, don't play to 
the bathroom window!" — Brooklyn Life. 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 

RQBT SIMPSON, Drugs ^iefi r S s s; «*. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALAXGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBAOH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 

121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



TO BE SURE. 

Father (after a long search for a book) — "Well, here it is. I wonder why one 
always finds a thing in the last place in which one hunts?" 

Son — "I expect it's because when we find what we are looking for we stop hunt- 
ing." — Pearson's Weekly. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, I THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



BARRETT & THOMPSON— ARCHITECTS 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

" PENN~MUTTJAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital $15,000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
86 00,000. Four per cent i nterest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 
122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 



ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Promptness and Neatness with all work. 

Marshall & West, Props. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, ST. C. 

Capital, 1225,000. Surplus and Profits, 8115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Bkiggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

DR. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, ST. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,000,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchfoed, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work suchas Altars, 
Pulpits, Ledums, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANTGERIN-WEIOKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy — China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



GEO. MARSH & CO., 
Wholesale Groceries. Produce Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



I 




gmzk 



COFFEE 

mESTOROCEJfS^ 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D. T. JOHNSON & SONS. 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 

Mi SES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, I906-'07. 



NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER. 



K - ov _ 15. — Thursday, 8 p.m.: The Ben Greet Players in "Everyman," Opera House, j 

Nov. 17.— 

Nov. 24. — Saturday, 8 p.m.: St. Etheldreda's Chapter. Annual Evening. 

Nov. 26. — Monday, 8:30 p.m.: Faculty Recital. 

^ OV- 28. — Wednesday, 8 p.m.: Epsilon Alpha Pi Society Eeception. 

Nov. 29. — Thursday: Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

D ec- 1.— Saturday, 8 p.m.: St. Elizabeth's Chapter. Annual Evening. 

Dec. 6.— 

D ec . 8.— Saturday, 8 p.m.: St. Margaret's Chapter. Annual Evening. 

Dec. 12 — 

Dec. 15. — Saturday, 8 p.m.: St. Catharine's Chapter. Annual Evening. 

Dec. 20.— Thursday at 1 p.m.: CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY BEGINS. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. GATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD F. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, Second Vice-President, 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



The Student Directory, 1906-'0T. 



The St. Mary's Muse Staff. 



(Under direction of Senioi Class.) 



Lillian Farmer, Editor. in-Chief. 

Emily Carrison, Business Manager. 

Louise Hill, 

Mary Spruill, 

Helen Ball, 

Beatrice Cohen, j 

Sue Prince, ) 

Heber Birdsong, v Art Editors. 

Alice McCullers, \ 



Managing 
Board. 



Literary Editors. 



MONTHLY. 

(Under direction of Muse Club.) 

Serena Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 

Beatrice Cohen, Act. Bus. Mgr 

Elizabeth Waddill. 

Helen Liddell. 

Helen Strange. J 

Lillian Farmer. Alice McCullers. 

Emily Carrison. Georgia Hales. 

Mary Spruill. Louise Hill. 

Sue Prince. Mary Vann. 

Margaret DuBose Eloise Robinso n 



EFSILON ALPHA PI. 



The Literary Societies. 



SIGMA LAMBDA. 



Lillian Farmer President Sue Prince. 

Elizabeth Waddill Vice-President Sarah Jones. 

Grace Ward Secretary Emily Carrison. 

Eva Rogerson Treasurer Helen Liddell. 

Sallie H. Battle Corresponding Secretary Serena Bailey. 

Louise Hill Critic Helen Strange. 

Frankie Self Historian Alice Corbett. 

Annie Wells 1 TpIIpts fKatherine Henderson. 

Kate Blacknall J xeuers t Eloise Robinson. 

The Auxiliary Chapters. 
General Directress Miss McKimmon. 

ST. CATHERINE'S. ST. ELIZABETH'S. 



Miss Thomas, Directress. 
Louise Hill, President. 
Jessie Harris, Treasurer. 
Emily Carrison, Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S. 

Miss Cribbs, Directress. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, President. 
Mabel Willis, Vice-President. 
Matilda Haughton, Treasurer. 
Bettie Sturgeon, Secretary. 

ST. MONICA'S. 

Miss McKimmon, Directress. 
Elizabeth Waddill, President. 
Janie DuBose, Vice-President. 
Lyman Grimsley, Treasurer. 
Chevilette Kinloch, Secretary. 



Mrs. Vincent, Directress. 

Susan Bynum, President. 

Alice Munnerlyn, Secretary-Treasurer. 



ST. ANNE'S. 

Miss Sutton, Directress. 
Eva Rogerson, President 
Blanche Robinson, Vice-President. 
Mary Vann, Treasurer. 
Minnie Leary, Secretary. 

ST. ETHELDREDA'S 

Miss Spann, Directress. 

Sarah Jones, President. 

Katharine Henderson, Vice-President. 

Alice Corbett, Treasurer. 

Marguerite Short. Secretary. 



young aoraertYi 



m m, mm. 



EASTER TERM BEGINS 



1907 



£• 



W tii%$& ::. \ 



THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

HH p&epama ran x school. 



I uj^fifefi^g ^reiSySmti^ tfeFiciiItv! 



ressive Music Dewtm^nt. Much Equipment New. Twenty-sight 
tos. Mtiler, Knabe and Sieinway Grand Pianos. Pl§Pl^ P . ..-. -H^r^f 
^^S?^^^^*^ ^Q^Jt^r^f icoi^ ;^^^jf. J^^ed^^^i^ffTtou/ slight/ 

RECTOR, 



jfaunbers' Ba^ 



6 flbuee 




MISS ANNE SAUNDERS, 1837-1906 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



FOUNDERS' DAY NUMBER. 



Vol. XI. December, 1906. No. 4. 



Special Alumnae Edition. 



Inscribed to the memory of Miss Anne Saunders — faithful daughter of St. Mary's, 
untiring friend of St. Mary's girls, true Southern gentlewoman — this Muse, pub- 
lished as a token of present day appreciation of the "good old days," is offered to 
the daughters of St. Mary's past, present and to come. 



CONTENTS. 

Founders' Day: its message Editorial. 

First and Last Margaret R. DuBose 

Madame Clement Mary Iredell. 

ANTE-BELLUM REMINISCENCES. 

Recollections of 1848-52 Fannie Bryan Aiken. 

Scenes in My School Days Madeline Saunders L'Engle. 

St. Mary's in the Later Fifties (1856-60) Nannie Lane Devereux. 

Personal Recollections of St. Mary's Annie Moore Parker. 



The Record of 1905-06. (1) Deaths; (2) Marriages. 
The Graduates of St. Mary's: 1879-1906. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. ealeigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Seeena C. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. Beatrice Bollman Cohen, Acting Business Manager. 

Sue Beent Peice, Elizabeth Waddill. Helen Steange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Louise Hill. 



EDITORIAL. 



FOUNDERS' DAY: ITS MEANING. 

It is now some years since November first, the Feast of All Saints, 
was wisely set aside at St. Mary's to be the one special school holiday of 
the year, the day of remembrance of the men and the women who estab- 
lished and built the school, that labored for it and loved it; the day on 
which to be especially thoughtful of what St. Mary's is and what it 
stands for, of what it has been and what it might be; the day of all 
days in the year when every alumna and every friend of St. Mary's 
should have the school in her mind — the school of her school-days and 
the school of the present — the day on which all the general good feeling 
and appreciation should be concentrated for a moment in common 
thought, when each could feel that throughout the South, yes, and the 
North, the East, and the West too, every daughter of St. Mary's was 
wafting up a thanksgiving for the past and a prayer for the future of 
Alma Mater. 

At Christmas, Epiphany and Easter we are one in feeling and sym- 
pathy with the hosts of the Church ; on Independence Day and Wash- 
ington's Birthday we are supremely patriotic, and our thoughts are on 
the State ; on Lee's Birthday and Memorial Day the upper thought is 
our pride in our inheritance as daughters of the South ; on Thanksgiving 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Mtjse Club. 






The St. Mary's Mtjse. 3 

Day we unite with a common race in voicing man's thankfulness to his 
Maker. Each of these holidays, holy days, days consecrated to lofty 
thought and noble act, makes us glad of our heritage and brings a fuller 
realization of our common blessings, and yet to the individual I doubt 
whether many of them have as deep a personal significance as has the 
anniversary of the personal joy or sorrow— the birthday, the wedding- 
day, the day that marked the passing of a dear one into the Beyond. 
The busy world goes on and knows, aye cares, nothing for our feeling, 
only the few remember and know, but the common memory and the 
common feeling binds those few the closer, and in many cases the re- 
membrance of that anniversary is a real tie through the year. What 
is true of the family is true in larger and lesser scale of the com- 
munity. The local holiday, celebrating some event of local history, 
commemorating the life of some local hero, is apt to mean more to the 
community than even the greater general holidays. 

There is a special significance at St. Mary's in having our Founders' 
Day co-incident with the great feast of All Saints, when the Church is 
remembering the saints of earth who are gone. It calls to mind the 
close relation between the Church and the church school; it reminds us 
that we are living to-day with similar surroundings and like opportuni- 
st ties to those which were the lot of the "saints"; it says to us that those 
who have labored in love here may now well be reckoned with the saints ; 
and it brings the day home to us as no sermon would, in reminding us 
i that the "saints" are no distant host recalled only in hymn and holy 

■ script, but are an unending throng, the host of those who in this world 
have lived their lives aright. 

But Founders' Day should be more than a localized 'All Saints'. It 

■ should be a "Home Coming Day," when, if not in body at least in spirit, 
J we may be united, when thoughts of Alma Mater claim first place in our 
|j thought, and our relation, past and present, to her welfare is in our 
i.j minds. It should be the special day of meeting for the St. Mary's 
J Guilds in the various towns where the AlumnaB are organized, and for 
I the organization of the Guilds in those places where as yet unorganized 
J two or three St. Mary's girls are met together. The impulse should 

2 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



come from the school, hut the Alumnae should be prepared to welcome 
it with receptive minds. A historical sketch iu the spirit of that of 
Hon. R H. Battle delivered on Founders' Day, 1901 ; a Founders' 
Day sermon; a Founders' Day poem — some one of these could be 
ready for the Guilds at their meeting-places and with one voice and 
one thought at one hour the united daughters of St. Mary's could join 
in voicing their feeling. 

Founders' Day, 1906, is now but a memory. jSTothing was lacking 
but the formal celebration. Cannot this be arranged before another 
year rolls by, and this not by decree at the school, but through a con- 
certed expression of interest and desire on the part of Alumnae and 
students ? Time will show. 

THE FOUNDERS' DAY MUSE. 

In the absence of a formal celebration in which the Alumna? could 
take part there seems no more fitting method of bringing the thought 
of Founders' Day before us than in presenting to the Alumnae this 
special Alumnae Muse. Issued in response to the suggestion of Alum- 
nae, consisting entirely of voluntary contributions from Alumnae and 
other material in which Alumnae may be expected to feel keen interest, 
we hope that this Muse will come to the Alumna? as a welcome visitor, 
bringing refreshing tidings — that it will add fresh fuel to the fires of 
love which burn so ceaselessly in many breasts, and will serve to re- 
kindle the flame in hearts where the embers are now but smoldering. 
May it arouse more than a passing interest, and may it inspire its readers 
to give others the opportunity of enjoying their impressions in later 
issues, and of keeping the school in closer touch with them as well as 
of keeping them in closer touch with the school. 

Our hope is to have this but the first of Founders' Day Muses in 
which shall be recorded hereafter a more complete register of those who 
nave passed beyond, and those who have married in the preceding year; 
which shall contain not more interesting, but more extended remi- 
niscences, recollections post-bellum, as well as of the early years, in 
which the younger daughters of St. Mary's may voice their feeling 
for the benefit of their elder sisters. 









The St. Mary's Muse. 



St. Mary's could have no greater blessing than the unfailing devo- 
tion of her Alumnae, and to those of them who have contributed to this 
number we beg to express our deep thanks and hearty appreciation. 

ALUMNAE RECORDS. 

And once again it seems a proper time to repeat the oft-made re- 
quest for help in completing the incomplete alumnae records. With a 
full list of the school-girl names of the St. Mary's girls from 1846 to 
1879 it would be a difficult task to trace any large number of them, 
but without these names we are completely at a loss. 

Mrs. Aiken speaks for many of us, her younger sisters as well as 
her contemporaries, when she answers the request thus: 

Dear Muse: — Did you ever in greeting some old lady have her peer into your 
face and say, "My dear, your face is perfectly familiar, but I cannot recall your 
name." Now, I am that representative old lady, and were you looking to discover 
the weakest point in old age, you have surely found it — the forgetfulness of names. 
I feel sure could I be given a panoramic view of those, over a hundred, girls who 
were boarders during my stay at St. Mary's, not one would escape recognition. 

However, to comply with your request for a list of my school-mates — not the day- 
scholars, as you can get more definite information nearer homes — I will make the 
effort. * * * Ah, well! I have straightened up, pulled myself together, wiped my 
glasses, rubbed my eyes, tried to brush the cobwebs from my brain, swept its corners, 
and rummaged generally, with the result as appended, fearing though the list may be 
of little service, as almost all of my companions have reached the age limit, "three 
score years and ten," and I do not mean to be frivolous, but the most apt quotation 
that will ring in my ears, are lines from a song of the long ago: 

"Where are the Marys, the Anns and Elizas, 

Loving and loved as of yore? 
Look in the columns of old advertisers, — 

Married and dead by the score: 
Married, dead, married, dead, 

Married and dead by the score." 

Yes, some like myself are enjoying the sweetest compensation of age, having 
loving children and grand-children, the dear little prattlers, to gather about them, 
and make their declining years bright and happy: the others at God's call have 
"crossed the river," are waiting to greet their loved ones on the heavenly shore, when 
they too have passed from "death unto life" and have gone to join the innumerable 
hosts of saints and angels. 

I thank you for the pleasure given by your request, for in imagination I have 
visited St. Mary's, peeped into the alcoves, roamed through the dormitories, halls, 
recitation rooms, school-room, parlor, and grove, have even chased some girls up and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



down the stairways from basement to the fourth story to find out their names. I 
wish they were written on their backs; I have had a regular game of "hide and 
seek," ending laughingly in my own discomfiture: but to use a favorite quotation 
of dear Dr. Smedes, "She hath done what she could— angels can do no more." So 
please accept my imperfect list, with the hope that if any future call should arise, I 
may do better. 

Most cordially and faithfully, 

Mrs. Isaac M. Aiken, nee Fannie Bryan. 
720 Palafoy St., Pensacola, Fla. 

While we may not be able to express ourselves as well as Mrs. Aiken, 
if each alumnae would show the same spirit and "do what she could," 
the matter would be settled. 



First and Last. 



When you hear of the school — just as most of us do — 
Of its feasts and its fun — and, of course, lessons, too — 
When you've studied the catalogue through and through — 
That's when you dream of St. Mary's. 

When you've told all your friends and relations "Good-bye," 
And have been on the train till 'most ready to die, 
And are tired and dusty and wanting to cry — 
That's when you dread St. Mary's. 

When 'mid rattle and clatter and dust in whirls 
You find yourself in an ocean of girls, 
With long hair and short hair, with plaits and curls — 
That's when you reach St. Mary's. 

When the girls take to hiding in quiet nooks, 
When all around you see nothing but books — 
And "exam-week" is plainly announced by the looks — 
That's when you fear St. Mary's. 

When the day comes that's dearest to every heart, 
When you don't know why, but your eyes will smart, 
When the best of friends are forced to part — 
That's when you leave St. Mary's. 

But from early youth till snowy years, 
'Mid a daily round of laughter and tears, 
Through a whole lifetime of joys and cares — 
That's when you love St. Mary's. 

— M. K. duB. 




MADAME CLEMENT, ST. MARY'S FIRST FRENCH TEACHER 

IN MADAME CLEMENT'S HONOR. HER 
DAUGHTER IN 1905. ESTABLISHED THE 
MADAME CLEMENT SCHOLARSHIP. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



Madame Clement: An Appreciation. 



MRS. MARY IREDELL, RALEIGH. 



In the calendar of St, Mary's "All Saints" is "Founders' Day," 
an^mtimatelj connected with the early work of the founder and first 
rector of St. Mary's are the name and personality of his able assistant, 
Madame Clement. She came with him to Ealeigh in May, 1842, and 
by his own statement was of invaluable help in carrying out his noble 
plan of founding "a church school for girls." 

Madame Clement was a French woman, and this fact was patent in 
her appearance, manner and accent. We can give no authentic state- 
ment regarding her coming to America, nor, at this time, even to the 
circumstances of her meeting Dr. Smedes and coming with him to 
iNorth Carolina. That when she came to America she left her little 
daughter Eleanor with relatives in France, we know, for many who 
are still with us recall the first coming to St. Mary's of the little home- 
sick French girl, who could speak no English, and whose mother could 
not conceal her disappointment at finding her "beautiful baby" so 
changed. But the mother soon grew to see the worth of her daughter, 
and both grew into a love for St, Mary's, her work and influence which 
lasted through life, and bore fruit which we may hope will endure 
through time to the brightening of many lives and homes. 

Madame Clement was quick and impulsive in word and act, with 
eyes which nothing escaped, and speech ever ready. Though a "terror 
to wrong-doers," she was just, good and loyal, full of zeal for the 
welfare of the girls, both in body and mind, and also very jealous for 
the school and the rector, their reputation and influence. These quali- 
ties, combined with unflagging energy, must have made her a most 
valuable assistant to Dr. Aldert Smedes in his noble work. 
^Not only did Madame Clement give her energies to Dr. Smedes in 
the management of the school in its early days, but she was for many 
years the teacher of French, a place filled later by her daughter, Miss 
Eleanor, who, after her education at St. Mary's was completed, re- 
turned to France and her beloved relatives there, to prepare herself 
for this work. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Though the data in our possession forbids any exact statement as 
to the number of years covered by the connection of mother and 
daughter with St. Mary's, subsequent events show plainly that their 
truest, deepest feelings were enlisted for her and her work as a church 
school. How much their life at St. Mary's had to do with the deep- 
rooted love of the church which their lives evinced, we may not know, 
but their devotion to the Church, her work and missions, was felt by 
their pupils in their school in Germantown, Pa., which they founded 
some years after they left St. Mary's — about 1862 or 1863 — and called 
"Madame Clement's School." This lasted for about twenty-five years, 
though not long after her mother's death, Miss Clement gave up any 
personal connection with it. 

The readers of the Muse are referred to a previous article published 
not long after Miss Clement's death in November, 1904, for further 
details concerning both mother and daughter and their interest in St. 
Mary's, as shown in Miss Clement's will. For who can for a moment 
doubt that the daughter's will reflected the mind and spirit of the 
mother ? 

By Miss .Clement's will St. Mary's received five thousand dollars 
for the endowment of a scholarship to be called "The Madame Cle- 
ment Scholarship," preferably for the education of the daughters of 
clergymen, and by the appointment of the Bishop of North Carolina. " 

It has been two years since the death of Miss Clement, and the 
scholarship given by her will as a memorial to her mother is held for 
the first time, and by the daughter of a missionary in the Diocese of 
Asheville. During Madame Clement's life at St, Mray's, the mis- 
sionary work in Western North Carolina — the whole State at that time 
being comprised in one diocese — was the most prominent part of the 
church work done at St. Mary's, and the girls were much interested 
in the mountaineers. Barrels and boxes of clothing, books, etc., were 
sent by them for distribution among the poor mountaineers, who in 
return showed their appreciation by sending bags of chestnuts and 
apples, not such common dainties then as they are now. For, in those 
days, railroads were unknown among the mountains and these good 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 

things were carried down to the central part of the State in covered 
wagons, thence to find their way by not much easier means to the 
neighborhood of the coast. As a St. Mary's girl I can vouch that 
no chestnuts have ever tasted as those did, all unexpected as they were, 
when some bright day in early winter the day scholars would go to 
school to find that they too had a share in the good things from the 
mountains. 

We rejoice that the first fruits of Miss Clement's legacy should go 
to the mountain diocese of North Carolina. 

But this legacy is only a part of the evidence that Madame and 
Miss Clement have through their life work and in the disposition of 
their earnings had the good of St. Mary's as a church school at heart. 
After remembering friends and relatives, faithful servants, church 
work and missions in all branches, the residue of their estate, having 
completed first a most noble work, will come to St. Mary's as a 
testimony of their lasting love and interest, h 



10 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Recollections of 1848-52. 



by "fannie bryan" (mbs. isaac m. aiken, pensacola, fla.). 

Dear Muse : 

Upon my return home a few days since, I found that some friend 
had sent to my address the February number of the Muse,, which I 
thoroughly enjoyed. Having a pride in being one of the alumnae of 
dear St. Mary's, I give herewith some little reminiscences which, if 
found worthy, can be accepted by the Muse, or embodied in any 
communication; otherwise consign the manuscript to the waste basket, 
and forget all about it. My sister and myself, Annie and Fannie 
Bryan, from Wilmington, 1ST. C, called the "little Bryans," being very 
small for our ages, she past thirteen, I just twelve, exactly the same 
size, dressed alike and in the same classes, entered St. Mary's in 1848, 
remaining there four years. I was for a time the youngest boarder 
in the school, but shortly after there were two my juniors; one I 
recall particularly, Helen Johnston, from Mississippi, an orphan, only 
eight years of age, who, by the way, during the war, armed and equipped 
a company 'for the service called the "Helen Johnston Guards." 

Seventy winters have frosted my hair with silver, but the sunshine 
of youth still lingers in my heart; the former, yielding to sorrow and 
age, the heritage of humanity, the latter, the result of a God-given 
cheerful spirit, strengthened by a mother's Christian influence and 
my wise guidance while a pupil at St, Mary's. Oh ! beloved Alma 
Mater, I am still a devotee at thy shrine, clinging to the altar of cher- 
ished memories of those four happy years. Some times, with eyes 
bedimmed with tears, when faces and forms "loved long since, and lost 
awhile," so closely associated with that period of my life, rise before me, 
again my face beams with smiles, tho' all "quimped" (crimped) in the 
corners, as my three-year-old grandson terms my wrinkles, when the 
amusing incidents call a halt to sadness. Of the latter, I remember 
the advent of Prof. Mendelssohn, just from Germany, as our Musical 
Director and teacher. His very broken English was a source of much 
merriment to us fun-loving girls. He complained to Mr. Smedes that 






The St. Mart's Muse. 11 



when he told the boy to bring his voots (boots) he brought him vood, 
and when he wanted vood (wood) he brought his voots. Upon seeing 
a frog for the first time, while walking in the grove, he called to Miss 
Frank O'Connor, who was near by: "Miss Frank, oh! Miss Frank, 
vat is dem people vat ops?" Again at table he sent his plate to Mr. 
Smedes when veal was served, and asked for a piece of "the cow's 
baby." He walked and talked with a dictionary under his arm, con- 
sulting it on all occasions, and much perplexed at not finding some of 
the slang expressions, used by, I must say, only a few of our girls. 
Prof. Mendelssohn was a first cousin of Bartholdy Mendelssohn and 
his first instructor in music. He one day pointed to the picture of the 
great composer, which he valued very highly, and remarked with 
pride: "There is an instance when the pupil excels the teacher." Prof. 
Mendelssohn was not only master of the piano and violin, but of the 
flute, harp and guitar. 

During my term of four years, we worshipped in the East Kock 
House, the first floor of which was used as a vestry room, or robing 
room, I should say, and fitted up as a chapel, simple, but to my mind 
beautiful in its appointments, an upright organ -accompanying the sweet 
girlish voices. The present chapel was erected during the course of 
my two younger sisters, Olivia and Verina Bryan, who entered in 
1853. A distinctive feature of the school for many years was the 
blue uniform, dark in winter, pale blue or white with only blue rib- 
bons for summer, a wise and beautiful requirement. 

I would love to pay a tribute here to clear friends, among teachers 
and pupils, principally our clique of Wilmington girls, the DeKossetts, 
Wrights, Londons, Mary Davis, of Newbern, the recollection of whose 
rich, deep-toned alto thrills me even now, and others too numerous to 
mention. But bear with me a little, for I should be derelict to love 
and duty did I not speak here of our beloved rector and principal, a 
man truly magnetic in his personality, so genial, his fatherly kindness, 
his gentle admonitions, his patient teachings, all won the love and 
admiration of his hundreds of pupils, his life work seeming to be 
to make his St. Mary's girls happy while within her walls, and to fit 
them for usefulness in this life and for eternal happiness in the 
3 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"world to come." Our daily exercise of two hours was usually limited 
to the enclosure, but as a great treat Mr. Smedes would occasionally 
take us out with him. He, with cane in hand, and at a swinging gate, 
would head a long column of pedestrians, taking us for a stroll through 
the woods, the gorgeous autumn coloring of crimson, gold and brown 
charming the eye; or again, climbing some high hill, watch from 
thence the declining sun, which lit up with brilliant rays the western 
sky. Having always a spirit imbued with love for the beauties of na- 
ture, so often in catching such glimpses of its manifold charms this 
thought, poetically expressed, is brought to mind: 

"If this is a vision faint and dim 
Of that which is to come, 
What must the unveiled glories be, 
Of our eternal home?" 

This sketch, dear Muse, savors much of the ego, but it all came 
naturally, so you'll pardon it, or, if needs be, put it down to the 
rambling of old age. 1 was married in 1858, so in January, 1908, 
D. V., my husband, who is in his seventy-sixth year, and I will cele- 
brate our "Golden Wedding.'' My name daughter, Fannie Bryan 
Aiken, was a pupil of St. Mary's in '84-'85. May prosperity attend 
dear St. Mary's and her very interesting publication, the Muse^ is the 
wish of an old St. Mary's girl. 




A ST. MARY'S CROUP OF THE WAR DAYS. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 13 



Thoughts of My School Days. 

BY "MITTIE SAUNDERS" (MRS. M. M. L'ENGLE, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.). 



It has been a very great pleasure to me to read in the St. Maby's 
Muse, which has been kindly sent me by a friend in Ealeigh — my 
childhood home — different sketches of bygone days at old St. Mary's, 
bringing back as they do recollections both happy and sad: and with 
the request that I, too, would add my quota of memories to others of 
the Alumnas. 

First of all, who could think of St. Mary's and separate from it 
recollections of our beloved principal and friend, Dr. Aldert Smedes? 

He was one of the best and noblest of men. Wise, kind, faithful 
to all duties, the purest of Christians, whose character stood out "the 
light upon the hill," and whose Christian teaching guided and purified 
and comforted not only the girls he taught and led in those early 
days, but reached far out through them and their homes to other gener- 
ations of later faithful Churchmen. 

And Madame Clement, our French teacher. Helpful and energetic, 
she proved an able and willing assistant to Dr. and Mrs. Smedes in 
getting a home ready and comfortable for the incoming students, and 
amiable and cheerful, they were sure of finding a friend in her. And 
as a teacher — can we ever forget the excellent daily drill in the French 
verbs, with Madame seated at the head of a long table of young girls; 
or when occasionally lulled into forgetfulness by the monotonous tones, 
poor Madame would nod and doze until the sudden quiet or a happy 
giggle startled her into wakefulness. But we were not at all afraid of 
Madame, who was always kind, though she exacted strict attention to 
lessons, for I remember well our once asking her: 

"Madame, do you say your prayers in English or in French ?" 

And her answer: 

"Mes enfantes, je ne sais pas." 

Being only a day scholar and not "a boarder," it would hardly 
become me to tell of the home life of old St. Mary's, though being 
in sight of my own home and entering so largely into my own life, it 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



was all very familiar ; but there is one little memory which has always 
been pleasant to me. The fourth of July celebrations ! Then all the 
day scholars were invited to dine and spend the day. And at noon 
the delight in watching for the big wagon which came laden with 
countless numbers of ice cream freezers, each full to the brim, which 
we knew was a sure signal that the dinner hour approached. And 
those dinners ! Oh, my friends, can no one remember the many dishes 
of rich, brown roasted fowls arid delicious fried chicken, and that then 
novelty to me, always associated with the Fourth of July dinners, the 
Indian dish of succotash, which brought to mind the dusky Indian 
maidens far away, or to our more practical thoughts, the tall, dark- 
green, waving corn and climbing beans which grew in the large garden 
in the rear of St. Mary's. 

All was harmony and happiness, and when gathered later about the 
piano, "Yankee Doodle" and "The Old North State" were sung with 
the loudest and most vociferous of voices. 



SOIREES. 



And the dignified soirees, to which we looked forward and for 
which we prepared with great care, curl papers and braided hair. We 
had visitors from town, many of them relatives of the scholars, with 
whom they chattered or sat on the long divans in the salon, listening 
to the music, often very fine, furnished by harps, pianos and voices, 
and members of the school. 

No dancing was allowed or thought of, but promenaders paced two 
and two around the long room. Then any girl who was so fortunate as 
to have an admirer might join the procession. Kound and round they 
went, and I have often sat and watched the moving feet and curious 
boat-like, turned up, pointed shoes, then worn by the fashionable youth 
in festal array. 

On one of the divans, always at the extreme upper end of the room, 
sat a row of little boys, closely packed, and there sometimes in passing 
a whisper might be heard, "Boys, don't scrouge !" or a sly pinch from 
one would make another jump, and a look from Madame Clement 
cause the row to sit up straight! 



The St. Maky's Muse. 15 

We thought them delightful recreations, those soirees, and no one 
ever called them tiresome. 

THE CONFIRMATION PAINTING. 

And now I would like to touch upon a subject which interests us all 
— the picture painted by Mr. Hart — later a distinguished artist — 
portraying Bishop Ives in the confirmation service. 

Perhaps Mrs. Ruffin, once Annie Haywood, whom I remember well, 
will be surprised to hear of another aspirant for the honor of being 
one of the figures portrayed in the class being confirmed by the Bishop. 
No less a person than myself, once Mittie Saunders of the school days, 
now bearing a more dignified name, Margaret Madeleine L'Engle, and 
glad to hear of an old schoolmate. 

One dislikes to write of oneself, but the occasion warrants it. 

Dr. Smedes wished to have the portrait of Bishop Ives as a com- 
panion picture to that of Bishop Ravenscroft, and it was painted for him 
by Mr. Hart — rumor stated— to defray the expense of tuition of a 
near relative of the artist, then at St, Mary's. 

Whether she was a half sister or niece I do not remember, but her 
name was Claudia Wingate, a. shy, delicate girl, and Claudia was my 
especial friend. 

Of course the painting of such a picture made quite a stir of interest 
and chatter, usually sotta voce. One afternoon while walking with a 
companion girl just outside of the grove to the west, we were discussing 
Art and possibly our own skill in drawing, for impulsively I plumped 
down on my knees and with a stick began drawing circles. While so 
absorbed, Mr. Hart, on horseback, whom I knew by sight only, sud- 
denly and quietly drew up by my side and asked what we were doing. 
"Drawing circles," we answered. "Ah," he repeated, "drawing cir- 
cles, the artist's most difficult task ; he that can draw a perfect circle 
may hope to be a good artist," Not long after this we, Claudia Win- 
gate and I, received a summons from Dr. Smedes, and were directed by 
him on a certain afternoon and hour to go to Mr. Hart's studio, which 
was near the capitol, and that he would expect us. ]STo reason was 
given, but this in itself promised a rare treat, and we did not fail to 
keep the appointment. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 

It was there that Mr. Hart told us he was painting the picture for 
Dr. Smedes ; that the central figure was to be a fancy sketch, two other 
figures Dr. Srnedes was to choose, but he had been offered by him to 
select any girl he desired from among the school-girls, and he had 
chosen me. 

Of course the surprise was startling and certainly unexpected, but 
while I was very much pleased at being "in the Bishop's picture" 
and thought it wonderfully kind in Mr. Hart to choose me, I was not 
half so much flattered then as I should have been, or as much so as I 
now am at the memory of this choice ; but it was a delightful experi- 
ence, and I certainly felt and expressed gratitude. 

I was placed in the picture kneeling next on the right of the middle 
or fancy figure. I do not remember the dress, but I do remember my 
hair was done up in a funny little knot at the back of my head, which 
I hope the artist made artistic, for I simply wore it in that way 
for convenience and to save time, for no day was ever long enough in 
which to accomplish all that I desired to do. It was not until I left 
school that I wore my hair curled. 

Changes may have been made later of which I was not aware, but 
I have often looked at, admired and thought of the middle figure, as 
the fancy figure of which Mr. Hart told us. 

I never knew why the artist so honored me, and whether it was 
the incident of the drawing of the circles which made him think of me, 
or what was more likely, because I was his sister's friend. 

We all like to hear anecdotes of distinguished artists and I will 
relate one little item of the conversation with which he kindly enter- 
tained us and which impressed me very much. It happened to be 
Friday and very likely we had some dainty which we politely offered 
to share with him, for he said : "ISTo, to-day is Friday, and I always 
fast on Friday. My landlady does not like it and is always trying to 
get me something nice in the place of meat, particularly eggs, and I 
tell her she must not do that, for there is nothing I like better than 
eggs, therefore eating them would not be fasting.'' 

While in Raleigh he painted a picture of my small youngest sister 
and a fine, large Newfoundland dog which we owned, she leaning 



* 



• 



/ 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



backward against him, her pretty white dress gathered up in one hand 
and filled with flowers, some lovely roses dropping out on either side. 

Some years afterwards my mother wrote to him and asked if he 
would sell the picture and what would be the price. His answer came, 

"For a thousand dollars." 

I am afraid I am exceeding the limits of my space, but just one 
more recollection to show our dear principal's methods of instruction, 
and I will finish. 

It was in the beginning of Lent that, in one of the classes, Dr. 
Smedes, in his kind, sympathetic, beautiful voice told us he was going 
to propose a way in which we might keep it and any one who desired 
to carry out his idea might do so if they wished, or decline if they 
saw proper. He said he knew of a very poor family, whose cottage 
stood greatly in need of a new roof, and that anyone who wished to 
help them might during Lent go without butter (try it and see how 
hard it is), and that he would keep a record of the amount of money 
saved, and apply it to that purpose. 

It is needless to say that by the time the holy Eastertide was reached 
the poor family was made happy by a new roof. 

And now, my far-away friends, wishing the dear old school pros- 
perity, and the Muse its full due of merit, I, who am justly proud of 
being one of the alumna?, bid you God speed. 



St. Mary's in the Later Fifties. 

BY "NANNIE LANE DEVEREUX," 1855-60 (MISS N. L. DEVEREUX, RALEIGH). 



When I was asked to write "what you remember of St. Mary's just 
before the war," my difficulty was not what to write, but what not to 
write, for memories of kind, faithful teachers and of dearly loved 
schoolmates crowded so thick upon me that it seemed almost an act of 
treason to fail to name each one and to give her her due meed of 
gratitude and affection. I shall try to tell what will be interesting to 
the "girls" of to-day, the granddaughters of the dear companions whom 
I recall with such warm love. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



When I began as a day scholar to know St. Mary's in July, 1856, 
the school was very large. I imagine there were nearly one hundred 
boarders and nearly as many day pupils. We had two terms in the 
year, from July to December, and from January to June, with two 
vacations, in June and December. This arrangement enabled the girls 
from the far South to spend the winter vacation at home, and the sum- 
mer one in the cooler climate of Raleigh. We had also the long day 
session, with dinner at midday, and a study hour afterwards. The 
day scholars had their dinner sent from home, and the procession of 
little negro boys carrying well-filled baskets was a daily feature on 
Hillsboro St. Then basket dinners were both dainty and abundant. 
One girl who objected to the water of the well at school always had a 
pitcher of ice water sent with her dinner, which of course meant 
another servant to carry it, and I have often seen a third bring a water- 
melon or some other heavy article for dessert. Two men and a boy to 
carry a dinner for two little girls ! 

At that time the chapel was still the first floor of the East Rock 
House, but during the following year the new chapel was built, the 
pretty chnrchly building around which the brightest and best life of 
St. Mary's has centered ever since. 

The teachers whom I remember best were Miss Evertson, austere 
and caustic, but strictly just, inspiring respect if not affection. Miss 
Hattie Harold, sweet and bright, whose gift for teaching arithmetic 
I have never seen surpassed. Mrs. Chudheigh, an accomplished Eng- 
lishwoman, was the art teacher for two years, 1858-'60. She had lived 
in many parts of the world, and her wide experience and rare powers 
of description and narration made her an inspiring companion. Be- 
sides drawing and painting, Mrs. Chudheigh had classes in literature, 
her excellent reading making all subjects attractive. She also taught 
a singular and ingenious system of mnemonics, which to one at least 
of her class has been most helpful. Miss Frank O'Connor had charge 
of the little girls in one of the basement rooms known as "Miss Erank's 
room." There were other gracious and cultured women, who seemed 
all to work in loyal accord with the methods of the rector. I always 



The St. Maky's Muse. 19 



loved my French teachers, of whom there were four during my life at 
St Mary's, the last and best loved of them all being Madame Gouye, 
gentle and elegant, one of the women whom "to know well is a liberal 
education." She remained at the school for many years, until failing 
health obliged her to return to her home in Mobile, Ala., where her 
death followed after a short time. 

I have left to the last my recollections of the founder and rector, 
Dr. Aldert Smedes. Who that ever came in contact with that vivid 
personality would fail to be impressed by it? His unfailing flow of 
spirits, his energy, his ubiquitous supervision of every detail of that 
large establishment, for every department was controlled by him, all 
made a marvellous union of broad management and minute attention 
to small things. Mrs. Smedes was most kind to the sick, with whom 
she charged herself conscientiously, but the care of her own young 
children, and the many calls upon her as a member of the society of 
Kaleigh, engrossed much of her time, and Dr. Smedes never allowed 
her to be taxed with teaching. 

Here I must observe one particular in which I think the old way 
at St. Mary's was wiser than the new. Dr. and Mrs. Smedes were 
frequent and welcome visitors at all the best houses in Kaleigh; each 
of the teachers had her circle of friends; in short, St. Mary's was 
an important factor in the social life of the little city, not a convent- 
like community living within itself, and not only running the risk of 
growing narrow and peculiar, but losing precious opportunities of 
influence through intimacy with the family life of the pupils. 

Dr. Smedes was a delightful and inspiring teacher, with a marvelous 
gift for impressing the essential points of the lesson and rejecting the 
less valuable ones. He had a method of his own in teaching French 
verbs by which the first girl began with the first person singular of the 
present tense. Her neighbor said quickly the second person of the 
next tense until the whole verb had been thus recited. No hesitation 
was permitted, and I venture to assume that no one who has ever 
recited a reflective verb "diagonellement" has ever failed to recall the 
required mood, person and tense, no matter how unexpectedly called 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



upon for it. I early began to appreciate the firm and higher side of 
Dr. Smedes' character, the qualities which made him a power for good 
and a nursing father to the Church throughout the South. I recall 
once hearing it said when Dr. Smedes was spoken of as a possible 
bishop : "No, never Dr. Smedes ; he already has too or three mis- 
sionary dioceses." I did not quite understand the remark at the time, 
but its justice has impressed me more and more as I remember how 
the girls at St. Mary's were drawn from the whole South, from Texas 
to Virginia. 

If you ask what in the course of work at St. Mary's exerted the most 
lasting effect upon my mind and habits of thought, I should say with- 
out doubt, the "abstracts," the clear, illuminating lectures on the 
Bible Lessons, given twice weekly, with the duty, none more binding, 
of writing, without notes, one's recollections of them. Besides the im- 
mediate instruction which in the course of a few years covered all the 
great points of Church teaching, and which has formed a priceless 
foundation of sound doctrine, a habit of attention to any speech was 
formed which has never been lost, and which has proved most valuable. 
The "Bible Lessons" were also admirable training ; each week we learned 
the Collect, twenty or more lines of standard poetry, and as many verses 
of Scripture carefully selected with reference to some doctrine. These 
lessons became fixed in the mind, and will be a treasure of teaching and 
reference so long as that mind has memory. In these memorized les- 
sons I learned, besides far better things, to know parts of English poetry 
not often read by young people, especially the delightful "Task," which 
I have loved ever since ; and thus I gained all the acquaintance I have 
ever had with "Paradise Lost, "Xight Thoughts," and other unreadable 
classics. 

One loving word must be given to my schoolmates, the "dear familiar" 
names of fifty years ago. The list will be most incomplete, but a few 
must be recalled: Annie Bryan, Sallie Rayner, Bettie and Emmie 
Johnson, Sallie Moore, my sister Kate, who was one of the little girls, 
among the day scholars ; and of the boarders, Tempie and Bettie Austin, 
Alice, Mary and Sallie Pearson, Arrietta Sherwood, Lucie Smith. 




THE MAIN BUILDING AS IT LOOKED IN THE OLDEN DA\ 



The St. Maky's Muse. 21 



How the roll would lengthen would I but listen to the voice of my heart ! 
But these rambling recollections are already too long. 

The three busy, satisfactory years passed at St. Mary's as a teacher — 
1893-96 — are another story. In those years I learned to appreciate the 
gentle dignity and unswerving honesty of Dr. Bennett Smedes' charac- 
ter; to admire his rare scholarship and to value his friendship. Other 
strong and lasting ties formed with the refined, cultured gentlewomen of 
the faculty, with whom it was an inspiration to work, have been a joy 
and a help in the following years ; but no more about St. Mary's after 
the Semi-Centennial." 



Personal Recollections of St. Mary's. 



BY "ANNIE MOORE" (MRS. A. M. PARKER, RALEIGH, N. O.), 



Some of my happiest days were spent at St. Mary's. 

The "day scholars" wore Quaker bonnets ; these were made of brown 
straw, with skirts and linings of thin silk of the same shade ; as the war 
came on, these linings were made of cambric and the skirts, much shorter 
and narrower ; a girl who could nourish a full skirt hanging down to the 
shoulder, made from the discarded silk of an old cloak, was considered 
handsomely gotten up, as far as the head went, anyhow. As these bon- 
nets came several inches over the face, our complexions were protected 
from winter's cold and summer's heat ; quite a contrast to the head cov- 
ering of to-day. I had two homespun (literally homespun) dresses ; one, 
my favorite, was made of brown and white plaid, collar and cuffs bound 
all around with blue worsted. I was always glad to have this one on. 

There were two people who indelibly impressed themselves on me 
during my stay at St. Mary's. One was Miss Evertson ; tall and slender, 
cold, quiet, severe ; she had evidently read and followed Napoleon's ad- 
vice to his marshals: "First make your men fear you, and then they 
will love you." She was certainly feared, but I can go no further. I 
did everything I could to get in her good graces ; she heard my history 
and mental philosophy. As I was fond of these studies, I generally 
gave a good recitation, but all to no avail. To my cherry "Good morn- 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ing" I received only a stiff nod and a little grunt. To me she was an 
enigma. I never knew her to laugh — the nearest approach was a smile. 
I learned afterwards she was a great sufferer, and can see it all now. 
Her chief weapons were sarcasm and ridicule. Whenever she turned 
these upon the enemy the rout was complete. One day she said very 
pleasantly: "Good morning, my dear!" As I was about as green an 
article as was ever offered to the public, I racked my poor little brain 
for more than an hour, trying to find out the cause of this wonderful 
improvement. Suddenly it flashed through my benighted brain, "Did 
you not bring her a basket of fruit on yesterday ?" Said fruit had run 
the blockade ; it was sent to my sister Lucy and she had divided it with 
her much loved teacher. This little incident taught me a lesson. For- 
ever afterward Miss Evertson was quite pleasant. Lesson: "Cater to 

the Powers that Be." 

MRS. JEFFERSON DAVIS. 

The first floor of the east building was devoted to art; there I was 
taught painting and drawing by Mrs. Cuddhey; the name was origi- 
nally Mcllcuddhey, from the reefs in Ireland, of which place she was 
a native, but of course abbreviated after the family came to America. 
Mrs. Davis, with her son Jeff, a lad of about ten years of age, were at 
St. Mary's for several months ; she spent whole forenoons in this room 
amusing herself by watching others, and trying to copy pictures. She 
was a tall, fine-looking woman, with a quantity of black hair and swarthy 
complexion. I was fond of listening to her conversation, for she spoke 
fluently and used beautiful language ; her voice was cultivated and well 
modulated. My great difficulty was foliage. One day my teacher, 
seating herself in my chair, began, slowly, on a small piece of paper, 
to show me how to clothe the limbs of my naked tree. "I don't see 
how it is, Mrs. Cuddhey, said I, "All you do is to take the pencil and 
make a few jigerdy-jigerdy marks and out comes a beautiful tree." 
Mrs. Davis, who was sitting near, looked at me and said in her most 
caustic manner, "Will Ihe young woman rise and explain what she 
means by the expression, 'jigerdy-jigerdy' ? I have never heard it 
before." It is needless to say I had no further use for her. 









The St. Mary's Muse. 23 

MILDRED LEE. 

When it was rumored that Mildred Lee was coming to St, Mary's, 
there was quite a flutter of excitement among the girls. One of them, 
on telling Miss Evertson about her expected arrival, received the fol- 
lowing reply: "Suppose she does come, she's no more than an ordinary 
mortal like the rest of us." She was a slender girl, with a prominent 
nose and gifted with a good voice, sweet and clear, but not very strong. 
About twenty years afterwards I met her at the Virginia White Sul- 
phur; she had developed into a large, fleshy woman, and her hair was 
snow white ; I scarcely recognized her ; I introduced myself to her, and 
wondered if I was as much changed as she was. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
After dinner we had an hour for recreation; this was spent in dif- 
ferent ways : the more studious hied themselves off to some unfrequented 
nook, and there, "far from the madd'ning crowd," conned their evening 
recitations; Gertrude Haywood, now Mrs. Ed. Trapier, was one of 
these. I can see her now, rocking herself backwards and forwards, 
bending over her book, which lay on her lap. I can almost hear her 
voice, as she repeated the familiar texts. 

PLAYING BALL. 

This was by far our most popular amusement. We divided ourselves 
into two parties, about twenty in a party, took our stand in the driveway, 
immediately in front of the main building. The ball was about as 
large as the top of a keg; of India rubber; this was thrown high in the 
air, directly upward ; ere it touched the ground one of the girls caught 
it on her foot and kicked it ; yes, kicked it, with all her strength, to the 
opposite side; they caught it, and it was returned in like manner, the 
object being not to let it touch the ground ; occasionally, through care- 
lessness, or perhaps intentionally, the ball flew wide of its goal, rolling 
a hundred feet or more out in the campus ; then such shrieking;, yelling, 
running, scrambling, you never saw or heard, for both sides, in full 
force, were after it. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



DANCING. 

Those who were fonder of this more quiet amusement went into 
the parlor, and by the music of the piano, danced polkas, mazourkas, 
and all kinds of square dances, invariably winding up with the lan- 
cers, or rather an attempt at them, which always created the greatest 
amusement. Our first recitation after recess was French. As we 
filed into Madam's room, our careless wardrobes and flushed coun- 
tenances told only too plainly how we had spent our time. Looking 
gravely at us she would say, "Oui mademoiselle vous avez trop danse, 
trop danse; ce nest pas bien; nous avons le meme chose hier, le jour 
avant hier et aujourdhui." 

DR. SMEDES. 

To him I owe a very great deal; his influence has followed me all 
through life; he was a born teacher and seemed to thoroughly under- 
stand the character of young women, and to know how to bring out 
their best traits. 

There were three truths which he impressed upon my young mind: 

First. Belief in an overruling Providence. "So then it was not 
you, but God, who brought me hither" ; from the beautiful story of 
Joseph. He tried to impress upon us this fact, that in all our worries, 
cares, heart-breaking sorrows; (and here he, looking into our young, 
happy, healthy faces, said most solemnly and impressively, "And 
my dear little children, they will come; sooner or later, in God's own 
time, perhaps when you least expect it, but always when it is best 
for you, you will find yourselves face to face with some great grief") ; 
our only refuge would be a firm belief in the goodness of God, that 
He knows what is for the best for us, and, moreover, some of our 
greatest trials have often proved our greatest blessings. Which one 
among us has not had this experience ? 

Secondly. Duties of the young to their superiors. Taking the 
Pastoral of Ruth, he explained it to us fully, giving us a clear idea 
of the manners and customs of those ancient days. "Whither thou 
goest, I will go; whither thou diest, will I die; thy people shall be 
my people, and thy God, my God; the Lord do so to me and more 






The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



also, if aught but death part thee and me." So fully did he impress 
upon my plastic mind my duties to my betters, my obligations to my 
superiors, that when I made up my mind to marry, I felt relieved to 
know that I would have no mother-in-law. 

Thirdly. Danger of Presumptuous Sins. The old Jesuitical Doc- 
trine of "Doing evil that good may come," found no favor in his 
heart; nothing could excuse us from a full, perfect and free obedience 
to the will of God; no "tithes of mint, anise and cummin," how- 
ever liberally bestowed, no fame, aggrandizement, influence, power or 
anything else, nothing but sincere, heartfelt repentance could atone for 
deliberate disobedience; no force of circumstances would excuse us for 
knowingly neglecting our duties. 

"Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the 
fat of rams." And so on through the whole Bible! 

Dear old St. Mary's, I love to think of you ; May your Future excel, 
if possible, your Past. In the name of God, Amen ! 



26 The St. ^Mary's Muse. 



In Memoriam, 1905-'06. 



Emily Barnwell Ravenel, Tryon, N. C, September, 1905. 

Edna Watson, Raleigh, October, 1905. 

Mary (Wimbish) Bailey, Raleigh, November, 1905. 

Mary M. Wooten, Wilmington, January, 1906. 

Anne Saunders, Raleigh, May 29, 1906. 

Pattie (Lewis) Manning, Chapel Hill, September 3, 1906. 

Delia (Lamb) Herrick, Williamston, October 15, 1906. 



Weddings, l905-'06. 

Oct. 25, 1905: Miss Carolyn A. B. Clark, of Augusta, Ga., to Mr. John Schley 

Hook. 

Sept. 27, 1905: Miss Helen Gladys Davies, of Augusta, Ga., to Mr. William 

Radford Eve. 

Oct. 12: Miss Kate Clifton, of Louisburg, to Mr. Bennett Boddie Perry, of 

Henderson. 

Oct. 31: Miss Margaret Lane Turk, of Raleigh, to Mr. Gavin M. Dortch, of 

Raleigh. 

Oct. 31: Miss Olive Armstrong, of Wilmington, to Mr. George Davis Crow, of 
Wilmington. 

Nov. 7: Miss Louise Greenleaf, of Elizabeth City, to Mr. Edward R. Outlaw, of 
the same place. 

Nov. 9: Miss Mary Thompson Dunn, of Scotland Neck, to Mr. Archibald Stuart 
Hall, of Scotland Neck. 

Nov. 16: Miss Emma Perrin West, of Wilmington, to Dr. Thomas Meares Green, 
of that city. 

Nov. 15: Miss Mary Kincey Boylan, of Raleigh, to Mr. Steadman Thompson, of 
Raleigh. 

Dee. 6: Miss Mary Wilson Johnson, of Raleigh, to Mr. Frank Masten Kimbark, 
of New York. 

Dec. 6: Miss Annie Pearl Pratt, of Madison, to Dr. John J. VanNoppen, of 
Madison. 

Jan. 10, 1906: Miss Tempe Boddie Hill, of Raleigh, to Mr. James Edward Carra- 
way, of Waynesville. 

Jan. 10: Miss Maude Middleton Latta, of Raleigh, to Mr. Archibald Hunter 
Arrington, of this city. 

Jan. 9: Miss Eliza Lamb, of Williamston, to Dr. C. H. C. Mills, of Charlotte. 

Feb. 14: Miss Loulie Biggs, of Oxford, and Mr. E. R. McKethan, of Fayetteville 

Feb. 15 : Miss Ellen West, of Raleigh, to Mr. John Dockery, of this city. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



Feb. 15: Miss Augusta Porcher Jones, of Columbia, S. C, to Mr. Derrill Darby 
Taber, of that city. 

Feb. 2 : Miss Annie Dughi, of Raleigh, to Mr. Joseph Daniel Maag, of Baltimore. 
Feb. 21: Miss Elizabeth Willing Massey, of Philadelphia (formerly of Raleigh), 
to Dr. Raymond Dean Thompson, of Jasper, Fla. 

April 16: Miss Eleanor Chase Emerson, of Wilmington, to Mr. Cornelius Van 
Leuven, of that city. 

April 17: Miss Caroline Laurens Wright, of Wilmington, to Mr. Arthur Van- 
Buren, of Wilmington. 

April 17: Miss Sallie Moore Leach, of Littleton, to Mr. Joseph Powell Pippen, 
of the same place. 

April 18: Miss Mary Boiling Sturgeon, of Apex, to Mr. Thomas F. Wilkinson. 
April 18: Miss Laura Placide Bridgers, of Tarboro, to Rev. Robb White, of 
Cambridge, Mass. 

April 26: Miss Martha Battle Lewis, of Raleigh, to Dr. Isaac Hall Manning, of 
Chapel Hill. 

May 1: Miss Effie Christian Fairley, of Monroe, to Mr. Nereus C. English, of 
that place. 

April: Miss Hattie B. Orr, of Charlotte, to Mr. Chas. Allison, of Mayodan. 
June 2 : Miss Lillian Taylor Slocomb, of Fayetteville, to Mr. Neil Davis Emerson, 
of Wilmington. 

June 6: Miss Annie Stover Stevenson, of New Bern, to Mr. Edward K. Bishop, of 
New Bern. 

June 28 : Miss Margaret Smedes, of Raleigh, to Mr. John Irving Rose, of Durham. 
June 27 : Miss Ernestine Hufman Vick, of Elm City, to Mr. Cola Martin Early, of 
Elm City. 

Aug. . . : Miss Adelaide Welsh, of Monroe, to Mr. Vernon Austin, of Monroe. 
Aug. 21: Miss Mary Harding, of Washington, to Mr. George Kenneth Grant 
Henry. 

Sept. 12: Miss Julia Rankin Hutchings, of Raleigh, to Mr. Henry Debnam, of 
Iloilo, Philippines. 

Oct. 4: Miss Addie Erwin Moore, of Yorkville, S. C, to Mr. John Bishop Bowen, 
of Yorkville, S. C. 

Oct. . . : Miss Theodora Marshall, of Raleigh, to Mr. Duncan H. Cameron, of 
Canton, China. 

Oct. 17: Miss Annie Mauger Taylor, of Pittsboro, to Mr. Edmund Strudwick 
Nash, 

Nov. 3: Miss Ellen John Faison, of Raleigh, to Mr. John William Sasser, of 
this city. 

Nov. 14: Miss Sue Clark, of Tarboro, to Mr. Marsden Bellamy, Jr., of Wilmington. 

Nov. . . : Miss Eda Cunningham, of Madison, to Mr 

Nov. 21: Miss Janet McKenzie Hawkins, of Ridgeway, to Mr. Milo M. Pendleton. 

Nov. 21: Miss Marguerite Crow, of Raleigh, to Mr. C. B. Crowell, of this city. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Graduates of St. Mary's. 



(Any corrections to the information contained in 
this list will be welcomed. Eegnlar courses for grad- 
uation were not arranged until 1879. Those persons 
whose names are starred* are deceased.) 

1879. 

Lucy P. Battle (Mrs. Collier Cobb) (*1906) 

Kate D. Cheshire Tarboro, N. C. 

Josephine Myers (Mrs. Thos. Jones) Asheville, N. C. 

Eliza H. Smedes (Mrs. A. W. Knox) Raleigh, N. C. 

Ella G. Tew (Mrs. W. E. Lindsay) Glendale, S.C. 

1880. 

Lucy Allston (Mrs. Wm. Meade) (*1904) 

Annie Collins (Mrs. W. L. Wall) Durham, N. C. 

Fannie Huger (Mrs. Christopher Fitz-Simons ) , Columbia, S. C. 
Gabrielle de Rossett (Mrs. A. M. Waddell) . . Wilmington, N. C. 

1881. 

Minnie Albertson Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Mary Settle (Mrs. Benj. Sharp) Greensboro, N. C. 

1882. 

Rebecca A. Collins (Mrs. Frank Wood) Edenton, N. C. 

Sallie L. Daniel (Mrs. E. Rawlings) Wilson, N. C. 

Kate M. Lord (Mrs. John Waters) Wilmington, N. C. 

Florence W. Slater 338 Lexington Ave., New York City. 

Ula P. Thompson 

1883. 

Mary Battle (Mrs. Collier Cobb) (*1900) 

Kate L. Sutton (Mrs. Walter Crews) Raleigh, N. C. 

1884. 

Elizabeth D. Battle ( *1899 ) 

Martha A. Dowd St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

S. Isabel Graves Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Alice Hagood (Mrs. ) Texas. 

Emilie W. McVea Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Annie H. Phillips (Mrs. Herbert Jackson) Raleigh, N. C. 

Emilie R. Smedes 3122 P. St., Washington, D. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



1885. 

Julia Horner (Mrs. H. G. Cooper) Oxford, N. C. 

Anna Lewis Winthrop College, S. C. 

Carrie L. Matthewson 

Sophia D. Thurmond Washington, D. C. 

1886. 
Jane W. Bingham (Mrs. Walter Toy) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

1887. 
Kate I. Gregory (Mrs. H. C. Robert) ... Ill 2d St., Macon, Ga. 

Frederika P. Mayhew (Mrs. Troy Beatty) Athens, Ga. 

Henrietta R. Smedes 3122 P. St., Washington, D. C. 

Elizabeth McLean Cheraw S C. 

1888. 

Caroline F. Allston ( *1896 ) 

Malvina Graves 

Jessie Gregory Crowell, N. C. 

Mabel Hale Bryn Mawr College. 

1889. 

Elizabeth B. Badham (Mrs. Julian Wood) Edenton, N. C. 

Alice M. Dugger (Mrs. Walter Grimes) 

Louise Finley Sewanee, Tenn. 

Beatrice Holmes (Mrs. Robert Allston) Tryon, N. C. 

Laura, Johns 

Fannie N. Yarboro (Mrs. T. W. Bickett) Louisburg, N. C. 

1890. 

Elizabeth Bridgers (Mrs. Cox-Finney) (*1903) 

Laura Carter Asheville, N. C. 

Charlotte E. Dancy 47 Atlantic Ave., Newark, N. J. 

Mary P. Frost Charleston, S. C. 

Bettie C. Gregory Crowell's, N. C. 

Carrie G. Hall 

Martha H. Haywood Raleigh, N. C. 

Alice Henderson Washington, D. C. 

Lucy Hester Washington, D. C. 

Daisy Horner (Mrs. R. C. Strong) Raleigh, N. C. 

Selma Katsenstein Warrenton, N. C. 

Anne Moore State Normal School, San Diego, Cal. 

Mary Phillips (Mrs. Hal Wood) Edenton, N. C. 

1891. 

Emily H. Barnwell (Mrs. Ravenel) Charleston, S.C. 

Charlotte Bush Bryn-Mawr, Pa. 

Susan P. Frost Charleston, S. C. 



30 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Lillie S. Hicks (Mrs. Bancker Smedes) New York City. 

Grace McH. Jones Asheville, N. C. 

Marion A. Mallett Fayetteville, N. C. 

♦Henrietta S. McVea 

Dixie C. Murray (Mrs. Weldon Smith) Raleigh, N. C. 

Virginia Thomas Mobile, Ala. 

L. Wirt Wesson (Mrs. Samuel White) Centreville, Md. 

1891. 

Charlotte Allston (Mrs. Maurice Moore) Union, S. C. 

M. E. Carwile 

May H. Davis Raleigh, N. C. 

Janet W. Dagger 

Jennie Peseud Raleigh, N. C. 

Frances Tunstall (Mrs. Clem Dowd) Charlotte, N. C. 

1893. 

Blanche Blake Raleigh, N. C 

Estelle Brodie (Mrs. Jones) Wilson, N. C. 

* Annie Gregg 

Nannie B. Jones (Mrs. T. M. Ashe) Raleigh, N. C. 

*Lillie Masten (Mrs. de Brutz Cutlar) 

Gertrude Royster Raleigh, N. C. 

Daisy Waitt Raleigh, N. C. 

Bessie L. Whitaker Staunton, Va. 

*Loulie Woodell 

1894. 

*Julia Daggetc 

Jessie Degen Augusta, Maine. 

Marie Lee Chester, S. C. 

Laura Newsom Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Page Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Wilmerding (Mrs. F. W. Ambler) Woodlawn, Ala. 

1895. 

Elizabeth E. Ashe (Mrs. George Flint) Raleigh, N. C. 

Loula Briggs Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret V. Hill Raleigh, N. C. 

Evelyn Holmes Bowman's Bluff, N. C. 

Miriam R. Lanier Tarboro, N. C. 

Fairinda W. Payne (Mrs. Cam. MacRae) .. .Wilmington, N. C. 

Eleanor Vass Raleigh, N. C. 

Marie A. Walker Brevard, N. C. 

1896. 

Florida Barnes (Mrs. Chas. Hopkins) Tallahasse, Fla. 

Harriet E. Bowen Jackson, N. C. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 31 



Elizabeth Cheshire Raleigh, N. C. 

Lucy Cobb Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Margaret M. Jones Flushing, N. Y. 

Mary P. Jones Hillsboro, N. C. 

M. Susan Marshall Raleigh, N. C. 

*Katherine P. Matthews 

Columbia Munds Wilmington, N. C. 

Nannie Skinner Raleigh, N. C. 

Bertha Stein Raleigh, N. C. 

1897. 

Nannie G. Clark Tarboro, N. C. 

Mary M. Hanff Raleigh, N. C. 

Theodora Marshall ( Mrs. Duncan Cameron ) 

Lillie E. Koonce (Mrs. Patterson) Smithfield, N. C. 

Isabella Pescud Raleigh, N. C. 

1898. 

Olive Armstrong (Mrs. Geo. D. Crow) Wilmington, N. C. 

Frances H. Cameron 

Josephine Belle Gulley Raleioh, N. C. 

Sally Harris 

Kate McK. Hawley Fayetteville, N. C. 

Jessamine May Higgs . . Raleigh, N. C. 

Annie Shaw Tarboro, N. C. 

Margaret H. Smedes (Mrs. John T. Rhodes) Raleigh, N. C. 

Sarah Smedes Root Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary G. Smith 

Ethel Worrell 

1899. 

Christine Busbee Raleigh, N. C. 

Minna Bynum (Mrs. Arch. Henderson) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Lucy Kate Cannady Oxford, N. C. 

Lucy B. Clifton (Mrs. Saml. Boddie) Louisburg, N. C. 

Kate B. Connor Wilson, N. C. 

Lillie E. Dodd Raleigh, N. C. 

Annie M. Dughi (Mrs. J. D. Maag) Raleigh, N. C. 

Nina W. Green, t. m Raleigh. N. C. 

Josephine A. Osborne, t. . Charlotte, N. C. 

Alice D. Smallbones 

Margaret Trapier Raleigh, N. C. 

1900. 

Mary H. Andrews, Sten Raleigh, N. C. 

Nannie Belvin (*1905) Raleigh, N. C. 

Ellen B. Bowen, Sten ' y a 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Keba Bridgers Tarboro, N. C. 

Mildred Cunningham Rockingham, N. 0. 

Alice L. Love Raleigh, N. C. 

Annie S. Love Raleigh, N. C. 

Caroline M. Means Atlanta, Ga. 

Anna Louise Pittenger Raleigh, N. C. 

Annie Pearl Pratt (Mrs. J. J. Van Noppen) Madison, N. C. 

Mary Cornelia Thompson Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary McA. Renn Durham, N. C. 

1901. 

Jeannette Biggs Oxford, N. C. 

Deas Manning Boykin Boykin, S. C. 

Annie Lee Bunn Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Eliza H. Drane Edenton, N. C. 

Lena Dawson Littlefield, N. C. 

Ellen J. Faison (Mrs. J. W. Sasser) Raleigh, N. C. 

Elizabeth Montgomery \ Raleigh, N. C. 

Julia Norton Parsley Wilmington, N. C. 

Alice E. Welch Monroe, N. C. 

1902. 

Marie Brunson (Mrs. P. A. Wilcox) Florence, S. C. 

Jennie G. B. Trapier Raleigh, N. C. 

Louise Venable Chapel Hill, N. C. 

1903. 

Annie Webb Cheshire Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Day Faison Raleigh, N. C. 

Elise Moore Gregory Henderson, N. C. 

Julia Hamlet Harris .Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Ferrand Henderson Salisbury, N. C. 

Mary Holton Hunter Norfolk, Va. 

Maretta Belo Holloman Raleigh, N. C. 

Katherine de Rossett Meares Ridgeway, S. C. 

Annie Gales Root Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Allan Short Lake Waccamaw, N. C. 

Florence Jackson Thomas Charlotte, N. C. 

Mary Wood Winslow Hertford, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 



1904. 

Eliza Richards Brown Raleigh, N. C. 

Isabel Ashby Brumby Marietta, Ga. 

Minnie Greenough Burgwyn Jackson, N. C. 

Cornelia Coleman Macon, Ga. 

Virginia Albright Eldridge Greensboro, N". C. 

Ann Kimberly Giff'ord Fort Monroe, Va. 

Daisy Watson Green Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Herbert Hampton, Va. 

Marjorie Hughson Morganton, N. C. 

Esther Barnwell Means Charleston, S. C. 

Elizabeth Willing Massey (Mrs. Dr. Raymond D. Thompson), 

Jasper, Fla. 

Carrie Helen Moore Littleton, N. C. 

Lucy Taylor Redwood Asheville, N. C. 

Elizabeth Piemont Skinner Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Gray Stedman Raleigh, N". C. 

1905. 

Anna Barrow Clark Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Rena Hoyt Clark Tarboro, N. C. 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose Raleigh, N. C. 

Ida Pollard Evans Warrenton, Va. 

Effie Christian Fairley ( Mrs. N. C. English ) . . . Monroe, N. C. 

Ellen Phifer Gibson Concord, N. C. 

Florence Lawton Grant Wilmington, N. C. 

Dorothy May Hughson Morganton, N. C. 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins Edisto Island, S. C. 

Bessie Poe Law " Raleigh, N. C. 

Mossie Elizabeth Long Rockingham, X. C. 

Mary Ellis Rossell Tompkinsville, N. Y. 

Malinda Ray Tillinghast Morganton, N. C. 

1906. 

Ruth Foster St. Simons Mills, Ga. 

Jane Iredell Greene Wilmington, N. C. 

Annie Eliza Koonce Richlands, N. C. 

Mary Thornton Lassiter Hertford, N. C. 

Margaret Devereux Mackay Raleigh, N. C. 

Harriett Elizabeth Ruff Ridgeway, S. C. 

Annie Whitner Sloan Columbia, S. C. 

Sara Gertrude Sullivan Savannah, Ga. 

Frances Elizabeth Woolf Demopolis, Ala. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT I 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHUTOGKAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



St. Mary's Souvenir Postals, 

St, Mary's 1907 Calendars, 

St, Mary's Pennants, 

Can be procured by writing to The Muse. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 

Dry Goods 



OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES FINE SHOES S^P SLIPPERS 



.Send to.. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS X GO. 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 

SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY- 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



J 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W. C. STRONACH'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FATETTEVILLE STREET 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll And up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 



"Tom Barker," said the teacher, "stay in after school and write a 
imposition of fifty words." 

Tom handed in the following and was soon on his way to the swim- 
ming-pool : 

"Jessie was fond of kittens. She saw one on the road and called: 
Eere pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, 
pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, 
pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, 
pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy, pussy." 



fHE BOYLAN-PEARCE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



tail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 

FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, X. C. 



.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

PROPERS 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. G. 

On application will send any article, selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 1ST. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 



JOLLY & "WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewt-lry repairing. 



One Gentleman, Anyway. — Being unable to find a seat in the 
crowded car, the portly dame had gone into the smoking-car and sat 
down next the door. 

The man sitting next to her, absorbed in his newspaper, kept on 
smoking. 

"I was- foolish enough to suppose," she said, glowering at him, "that 
some of the men in here, at least, were gentlemen." 

"Pardon me, madame," he answered, politely offering her his cigar- 
case. — Chicago Tribune. 



A. D U GH I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Prvate Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 2x6 Fayetteville St. 






CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 

ROBT SIMPSON, ^"ftS^^&Z. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 



ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and ! 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



I 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Useth-, best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Complimentary. — It was a few days after the examination. The 
French class had just received their papers, and found them corrected 
ivith the usual method of H for honor, C for creditable, P for passed, 
and so on. To-day honors prevailed, and accordingly mademoiselle 
Deamed. Tapping lightly on the desk with her pencil, she leaned to- 
ward them. 

"My pupils," she cried joyfully, "ah, how you have pleased me! 
Such encouragement! Quel plaisir! I feel you are all upon the road 
| H !" — LippincoW s. 



m SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE 



JARRETT & THOMPSON-Architects 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

15% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

"PEN NM UTlf AL~LTFE~TNS UR ANCE~CO _ ~ 

R. B. RANEY, general Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
SJ?™J S15 ' 000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
iUO.OQ'). Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

32 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

m ^ ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mar.v's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. ' 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH. N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Promptness and Neatness with all work. 

Marshall & West, Props. 



POWELL & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St, Raleigh, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, 8225, 000. Surplus and Profits, 8115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. B. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet- Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



W. B. MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 



PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteviile St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - 100,000.00 

Deposits, - 1,000,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier , 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

GEO. MARSH & CO., 
Wholesale Groceries, Produce, Fruit, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



^rmk 



COFFEE 

*B£STGROCE#S [ 



Dr. RUSSELL G..SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits,Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of* everything and at rook 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D. T. JOHNSON & BOSS. 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 



Mi SES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrio 



)U$. 



m 



ary's School, 

(for girls and yOung luomm). 



NUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 20 ; 1Q06. 



3SASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 24, 1907. 




wMon iii : these 




OR 



SCHOOL. 
3. 7 HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

bih^^BhHHBI 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



^are- polled 22& students Mm IB Bioeeses. 

Twenty -five Members in the Faculty; 



fit,: PftgrtSQm. Music 
Pitatpir., Miilep, 

atogue and other information 




Km. McN& 



'ew. Twenty-Gight 
n without slight 



rector: 




Christmas IRumber 



TLhc 
St. /IBar^'s /Hbuec 



December, 1906 




IRaleigb, B. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 



December, 1906. ^ 5^ 



On a Christmas Night. 

Alone and desolate I sat, 

By winter's wind chilled through and through, 
With hunger famishing and faint, 
And oh, my heart was starving, too. 

The winter's snow lay all around, 

And winter's snow was in my breast, — 
In darkness, grief and sorrowing, 
I longed for love and light and rest. 

At last the midnight hour was reached, 

And as the bells tolled crisp and clear, 
Such strains of music followed fast 
As mortal ear did never hear. 

A choir of heavenly voices sang, 

And hope was kindled in my mind, 
Of joy in Heaven, and peace on earth, 

Of good will unto all mankind. 

My starving heart was straightway fed, 
The snow was melted in my breast, 

Warmed, comforted and strength renewed, 
My soul was filled with joy and rest. 



Helen K. Liddell. 



A Christmas Story. 

KOSA A. HEATH. 



She was a dainty little lass of ten, with no brothers or sisters, and 
his was a constant sonrce of trouble to her warm, impulsive little 
lature. Her mamma was always very busy-she had so very many 
>arties to go to-and papa,-but she didn't 'xaetly know him, 'cause 
ie was busy, too ; but with big books instead of parties. Her mammy 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



was the very bestest in the world, only mammies won't let little girls 
go anywhere or do anything by themselves. Now this little girl just 
knew that if site could once get 'out In the big woods with the birds and 
rabbits, she wouldn't be so lonesome. 

This morning when she waked the snow was on the ground, and she 
was sure her little birds and things in the woods were starving; so 
when at last mammy went down stairs to help get ready for the party — 
for even mammy had to help to-day to get ready for mamma's Christmas 
p ar tj — s he sat at the window thinking how she could help the poor little 
animals. At last she jumped up, took her untasted breakfast, put it in 
her basket, and after a great deal of climbing on chairs, got on her 
mittens, cap and coat. She knew mammy wouldn't like it, so she 
slipped out of a side door and ran until she was out of the lane and in 
the woods. 

But there weren't any birds, and the only rabbit she saw ran from 
her. She was getting drefful cold ancl tired too, so she threw the break- 
fast away and decided to go home, but Oh! she didn't know the way. 
The tears just would come of themselves, so she sat down awhile; had 
there ever been such a cold day % But she was so sleepy that she didn't 
remember any more. Old Uncle Jerry, coming along just a few min- 
utes later, saw the little curly head leaning against the tree. "Well 
suh, if dar ain't old massa William's grandchild 'sleep in the snow. 
Ef de young massa is forgot de ole nigger an' let him lie down an' 
nearly die wid out doin' nuthin' fer him, de ole nigger ain't ferget his 
pa an' dis chile, ernuf lak ole missus ter be her herself." 

When the old man got to the "big house," as he still called it, with 
his limp and white little burden, he found its occupants flying wildly 
about, the maids crying and the men taking orders of Mr. Kandolph as 
to how they should begin the search. Mrs. Kandolph was out on the 
porch, walking distractedly up and down, while mammy, her apron 
over her head, sat on the steps rocking herself back and forth and I 
groaning dismally. The mother was the first one to see the old man 
as he almost staggered up the walk with his little burden. With a cry, 
Mrs. Kandolph rushed down the walk and, gathering her child in her 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



arms, went quickly back to the house, giving orders for restoratives, as 
she went. 

Thanks to her youth and her hardy constitution, the little maid soon 
opened her eyes, but who was it bending over her? Not mammy, 
could it .be mamma ? yes, her own beautiful mamma., It must be a 
dream, she thought, but it was a dream that was going to last. 

Poor, exhausted Uncle Jerry had not been forgotten, but was helped 
to the kitchen and, under the combined influence of a big fire and a 
stiff drink from Mr. Eandolph's own hand, he soon revived and was 
able to go to see his little "mistis," as he called her. This was always 
his name for her, for now he was no longer neglected, but, lived on the 
place, where he could be cared for by the family at the "big house." 

The Gift of Love. 



Full of silent meaning, 

In the heaven above; 
Shone the Star of Ages, 

For the Child of Love. 

In all its radiant beauty, 

O'er the distant hill; 
It had done the duty; 

Heaven stood hushed and still. 

Out upon the hillside, 

Those who saw the star, 
Stood in holy wonder, 

Watching from afar. 

Then there came a message, 

To this lonely earth; 
Borne by blessed angels, 

Of His holy birth. 

Now the glad rejoicing, 

Borne upon the breeze; 
Christ the Lord is given, 

On the earth be peace. 

Ruth Vebnon Newbold. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



That Christmas Eve. 



RUTH VERNON NEWBOLD. 



Snow had been falling all day, and now as the darkness was creeping 
over the little town, it fell more and more slowly, until finally it stopped ; 
as much as to say, "I must give room to the darkness, you know." 
Everything was covered in a cloak of soft white ; it seemed as if nature 
was trying to make a downy bed for the baby Jesus; one better than 
the hard manger. 

The dark purple shadows of evening flitted and fell on the faces of 
those that passed on the crowded street; now lighting the face of a 
proud woman who, followed by a fat coachman, came out to her car- 
riage ; then falling softly on the face of a tired little black-garbed woman 
who carried a bundle of sewing. Kind nature lets her shadows rest on 
rich and poor alike, and as the shadows on this Christmas eve fell on 
the faces of the people, softening the lives of care and worry, so the 
shadows of life fall on us, strengthening and lifting our souls to- 
wards God. 

All seemed joy and good- will outside, for was not the next day 
Christmas ? These were the thoughts that little Kathleen had as she 
gazed on the crowded streets from the window of her uncle's magnifi- 
cent home. Six months ago her mother had died, leaving the little 
girl in the care of her only brother, Kathleen's uncle. All knew that 
Judge Grant was a skeptic, but the longer little Katharine stayed with 
him, the worse the awful truth seemed to grow. Time and again had 
she tried in her artless, innocent way to say such things about the dear 
God that would make the truth clearer to her uncle, but he always 
laughed and told her not to trouble her little head about what she did 
not understand. That made her feel so weak and helpless. Of course 
she couldn't understand her uncle's thoughts, but she knew the feeling 
of joy that comes from having perfect love and trust in God. Lately 
she noticed the unsatisfied, longing look her uncle wore; he would sit 
for hours reading, occasionally looking up from his book with a deep 
sigh. That look said to Kathleen — "I would believe, if I could." 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



But on this evening, something that she said about her uncle's taking 
her to church the next day caused him to make an irritable reply. The 
tears started to her eyes and she left the room. In a few minutes he 
saw her cross the street and enter the door of the little church. Im- 
pelled by curiosity, he took up his hat and followed her, entering the 
church and sitting down by one of the large pillars, which entirely hid 
him in its shadow. He watched the little grey figure curiously as it 
walked up the isle of the silent church, paused by the great organ, and 
knelt in prayer. The odor of fresh cedar, with which the church was 
decorated for the next day, floated to him; he closed his eyes, for a 
strange feeling seemed to fill his soul with awe and sadness. He was 
a little boy again, saying a prayer by his mother's knee, then again run- 
ning at will through the wood, where the sweet smell of cedar filled his 
senses with a dreaming, restful feeling. If mother and father had 
lived, it might have been different, he thought, and a stem look came 
into his eyes as he remembered the struggle he had had in getting bread 
for his sister and himself. Had the world been kind ? It took his sister 
away and left him the despair of never seeing her again, because he 
could not believe. In exchange it gave him wealth — what was that 
to him now, he the most miserable of men ? 

But as he sat there dreaming of the past, he opened his eyes quickly 
at the sound of the organ. At first it was a low wail ; Kathleen played 
well and it seemed that she was pouring out her sorrows and disappoint- 
ments in that one strain of music; then her hands faltered, the music 
ceased and she bowed her head over the keys back amid the shadows. 
Her uncle watched her silently. The loneliness and silence made a 
wave of solemn feelings pass over him. The music began again, deep 
and rich — 

"Oh! little town of Bethlehem, how still I see thee lie," 
sang Kathleen; then, 

Amid thy deep and dreamless sleep." 

The silent stars go by; 
Yet in thy dark streets shineth 

The everlasting Light; 
The hopes and fears of all the years 

Are met in thee to-night. 



6 The St. "M" a try's Muse. 

Slie sang the beautiful hymn on to the close ; hut the words, "TJie 
hopes and fears of coming years are met in Thee to-night," rang in the 
ears of her listening uncle. "The hopes and fears," he whispered to 
himself ; and the tears, the hot, scalding tears of repentance, fell fast 
as he dropped on his knees in silent prayer. He felt as one feels when 
in a strange land where every one hurries by, always looking onward. 
At last out of that sea of strange faces you see one f ace,— it is strange, 
too, but the eyes look straight into yours, then a friendly smile ; then the 
person passes on. A single ray to light the darkness ; "ships that pass 
in the night" . i 

The hymn ceased, and "Good tidings of great joy I bring to you and 
all mankind," were the words that seemed to burn into his dazed brain; 
they rang clear and strong through the church. Oh, little Kathleen, 
could you have done better if you had known that your singing was 
light to your uncle's mind ? She came lightly down the aisle, in her 
eyes a little tired look, yet a look of love and faith. She starts in sur- 
prise at the sight of the Judge; he takes her hand in his, while the 
words, "And a little child shall lead them," pass through his mind. 
There is no need of words ; she understands, and you would too, if you 
had seen their faces. 

My Violin. 

Deep in your soul of souls there sleeps 

A host of silent harmonies, 
And 'round them all I think there rests 

A haze of old-time memories. 
•'■ ' ill "t 

A thousand stories could you tell, 

And once these themes your voice has sung; 
Oh, dusty fiddle, would that I 

Could lift the silence 'round you flung! 

And yet no music sounds from you, 

Because no power within me lies, 
To stir you from your silent sleep, 

And wake the phantom melodies. 

I take you from your old worn case, 

And idly dream of what might be, 
If only silence did not reign 

Between my violin and me. Serena C. Bailet. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



Bennie. 



JESSIE M. CHAPMAN. 



At the top of Black Bear, a small mountain about thirteen miles from 
town, is a tiny log cabin which has withstood the driving winds and 
deep snows of many long years. In this bumble home lived Bennie 
and his grandmother, happy in their poverty and contented as long as 
they could be together. 

The little boy was nine years old and his greatest pleasure was to take 
care of his grandmother. Ever since bis father and mother had died, 
when be was only six years old, his idea of responsibility had been 
growing, and now his grandmother had learned to depend upon him as 
much in other matters as in his providing them both with food for 
eacb day. 

At the foot of the mountain was a small cornfield, and to it Bennie 
would trudge every morning during the season and faithfully hoe corn 
until bis little limbs would ache and grow so tired he could not hold 
the hoe another moment. 

Then some mornings he would start off early, perhaps wading through 
deep snow, his thinly clad shoulders shaking and his hands blue with 
cold, to the town to sell a few eggs which his grandmother's hens had 
laid, and to buy some necessary things, without which his grandmother 
would not be quite so comfortable. He picked chestnuts every after- 
noon during one month, in the time when he could have been playing 
with the other boys, and that Christmas, with the money so earned, he 
bought a warm, red shawl to put over his grandmother's shoulders. ' 

So, for three years he had worked with all his energy for the one 
person in the world he loved best. At night his grandmother would 
get out the big Bible, the only book they possessed, and read him several 
chapters, and then he would draw his chair up close beside her and 
slowly, with infinite pains, read the easy words. Every night she 
would teach him two or three new ones and, at the end of two years he 
could read almost a whole chapter without stumbling very much ' 

Then when he was nine his grandmother began to grow weaker and 
at times have severe attacks of an illness which Bennie could not under- 
hand When he sat by her bed and held her hand she grew quiet but 



2 



8 The St. Mattes Muse. 



if lie left her even for a moment she moaned and tossed from side to 
side. Generally, after two or three days, she would be able to get 
around again, but one cold morning in January, Bennie got up to light 
the fire and found his grandmother very ill. Tor three days he nursed 
her tenderly and comforted himself on the third night, with the thought 
that she would be better, as usual, the next morning. But when he got 
up, to his great distress, he found her worse, and when he went to her 
bedside to ask her if there was anything she wanted, she stared at him 
wildly and called him strange names. The little boy was very much 
worried, for he had never seen any one act like that, and he did not 
know what to do. He knew there was no doctor anywhere within ten 
miles, he had no near neighbors on whom he could call for help and no 
money with which to buy medicine, even if he could get the doctor, so 
all day long he used his simple remedies and trusted his own judgment. 
The snow had been falling steadily for two days, and towards night, 
when his grandmother got so much worse, Bennie put on his thickest 
coat, pulled his cap down over his ears, and, driven almost to despera- 
tion, started out in the blinding storm to get the doctor. The trees 
partly sheltered him until he got to the foot of the mountain, then he 
had to struggle through deep drifts with the driving wind full in his 
face. It was almost as dark as midnight, and his body ached with the 
intense cold as he bravely pushed on, determined to get to the doctor's 
and save his beloved grandmother at last. After over four hours of 
suffering that would have been hard for even a man to bear, the brave 
little boy saw a light in the distance, which told him he had at last 
reached his destination. He dragged himself along and pushed open 
the door of the doctor's house, then, with gasping breath, he told the 
doctor to hurry as fast as possible to his grandmother, that she was very, 
very ill. The doctor made him sit down and rest a few minutes, and 
said he would hitch up his horse in half an hour and then they would set 
out together. But Bennie could not be persuaded to wait. He said 
his grandmother might need him, and he must not stay. 

So out again he went in the snow, which grew deeper every moment, 
and ploughed onward towards his home. He could not see a step in 
front of him, and suddenly he plunged forward and went down, down, 
some hundreds of feet. He stretched out his arms to break his fall, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 



but his fingers clutched only empty air, and in a few moments, when 
at last he struck bottom, he was unconscious and never knew anything 



more. 



So, this brave, unselfish little life went out, and Bennie died serving 
his grandmother, to whom he had given his life. 

In Lighter Vein. 

First girl (discussing Senior English) :— "Coffee is a word borrowed 
from the Turkish." 

Second girl: — No it isn't; it's Arabic." 

First girl:— "Well, that's the same thing, for Turkey is in Arabia." 

GLEANINGS FROM HISTORY PAPERS. 

"Olive Cromwell was a very ambitious man." 
"Wentworth brought in a 'Bill of Writes.' " 

Margaret C. to Phyllis H. (who is brushing her hair) :— "Oh, Phyllis, 
your hair is so luxurious !" 

Jessie C. :— "I need a pair of high-heeled shoes to make me taller in 
the play." 

Margaret T. :— "Oh, I'll lend you a pair of high shoes." 
French Teacher :— "Where does the Nile rise ?" 
H. S.:— "In the Pyramids." (She afterwards explained that she 
meant the Pyrennees). 

First girl (during dressing-hour) :— "Oh, I haven't but a second to 
get dressed in!" 

Second girl:— "That comes of having such a laundry." 

History teacher :— "What was the ground of Harrison's election? 
H. S.— "Well, er— er— I guess it was Clay" ! 

Heard in Junior English :— "The Bible was put into parenthesis." 
(Let us explain that she meant that it was paraphrased.) 

Miss Fenner:— "I am doing double work to-day— am painting two 

pictures." 

E. M.— "Oh, Miss Fenner, are you painting a picture with each 
hand V 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



One Dollar. 



Subscription. One Year. = = - - ^^ 

Single Copies, = s 



Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions^ ^ ^^ ^^ 

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EDITORIAL STAFF. 
Serena C Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. Beatrice Bollman Cohen, Acting Business Manager. 

S SUE BRENT PRICE, ELIZABETH WADDILL. HELEN STRANGE. 

Helen K. Liddell. Louise Hill. 



EDITORIAL. 



Christmas. 



Christmas at last! After eager anticipation and- counting of hours, 
the holidays have finally come, and most of us are really going home! 

How much pleasure we are looking forward to at this happy season 
God grant 'that our genuine delight in every Yule-tide festivity will 
never diminish through the sophistry of the worldly-wise. Tor Christ- 
mas is the yearly symbol of the Christian spirit of generosity and love- 
Besides being celebrated as the day of Christ's nativity, it is also a 
human bond between man and man; a demonstration that we live not 
only for ourselves, but also for the welfare of others. 

The best way in which to spend the day, therefore, is in being our 
happiest and in striving to make other people so; in helping those 
around us and those less fortunate than we to have the utmost blessings 
of the Christmas-tide. 

Which? 



There are many kinds of students in every school or college, perhaps 
as many as there are individual girls or boys, though each personality 
can to some extent come under a general head. We are concerned now, 
however, with merely two types: that is, two classes of earnest students. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 



The first of these is often met with ; it is typified by a hard-working, 
conscientious girl whose aim in coming to school is an ambitious one, in 
whose school life no dawdling or trifling finds a place. All of this is 
very right, yet from this earnestness, entirely laudable in itself, there 
sometimes arises an evil — what shall we call it? A narrow field of 
interests, perhaps, which sees no duty but that of gaining knowledge 
and the outward recognition of that knowledge — good marks. We feel 
that learning is a priceless treasure, and yet is there nothing else that 
our schooling is to give us ? 

This question brings us to that other class of studious girls. No 
less devoted to duty than a student of the first named class, a girl of 
the second type has a wider scope of work, a greater interest in the 
welfare of her school, and everything that represents or is represented 
by it. She will sometimes consider the progress and pleasure of the 
many to the detriment of her own outward success. 

These are merely two different types; but with you we will leave 
the question, "Which will be of more use in the World of School, and 
in the World of Life outside ? 



Everyday hjonor. 



Eeal honor is not a virtue that we can slip on like our best clothes, 
but something that the true man or woman keeps sacred in his or her 
heart: a treasure always to be retained at any cost. It is not merely 
for to-day; to be cast off, if we will, tomorrow; it is something that, if 
we acquire it in our youth, will be likely to remain with us forever. 

There is no time when honor is more needed than in our school-days, 
the period in which our characters are being formed into the mold of 
maturity. School girls and boys, however, sometimes seem to have the 
idea that they are "on their honor" only when "put on it" by a specific 
teacher. Of course this is a mistaken view of the case; we are always 
responsible for our actions, whether or not some one calls us to account 
for them. A higher duty— that of doing right for its own sake- 
should guide us in our conduct in class as well as in our general rela- 
tions with others. Honor is indeed 

"Sole monarch of the universal earth." 



12 The St. Mart's Mttse. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



GEORGIA. S. HALES, EDITOR. 

"Who's to Inherit ?" 
St, Etheldreda's Chapter gave the play, "Who's to Inherit?" on the 
night of Saturday, November 24. It proved a great success. The 
actresses put themselves in their parts and did their best: Phyllis Hick- 
son, refined and uncomplaining as became a "lady" ; Annie Wood, just 
the'right one for the "lady's" dainty, unselfish daughter; Coatsie Bene- 
dict was tall and handsome in black, sincerely mourning the old general ; 
Bessie Watters was very charming; the three old maids, Page Shell- 
burne, Alice Moore, and Paula Hazard, were prim and smiling; Sadie 
Thomas was just the best old Irish woman that ever was seen, and last, 
though not least, Margaret DuBose, the faithful old kind-hearted ser- 

Van ' CHARACTERS. 

Mrs. Annersley Ph y llis Hickson. 

Julia Annersley Annie Wood - 

Mrs. Manfort Coatsie Benedict. 

Mrs. Fitzfudge Bessie Watters. 

Miss Pry i Pa g e Shelburne. 

Miss Chatter Paula Hazard. 

Miss Nicely Alice Moore - 

Mrs. Hodgins Sadie Thomas. 

Margery Margaret DuBose. 

Faculty Concert, November 26th. 
[From the News and Obsebvee.] 

The Faculty Recital given at St. Mary's School last Monday night was a musical 
treat greatly enjoyed by those in attendance. 

The new members of the faculty, Professor and Mrs. Vincent, proved themselves 
to be performers of exceptional ability. Mrs. Agnes Vincent sang in beautiful voice 
and with finished art. Her voice is a strong, rich soprano of great range and 
power, and her rendition of the valse Arietta, from Romeo and Juliette, amply 
justified the reports of her skill and training; through all the intricacies of the song 
her flexible voice rang true and elicited prolonged applause. In her ballads her 
enunciation was natural and she sang with exquisite tenderness of sentiment. 

Mr. Vincent is a talented and accomplished pianist, in whose playing individuality 
is strongly marked. In his Liszt numbers he gave evidence of a brilliant technique, 
playing with a bravura and a sureness that was most gratifying. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 13 



Owing to the illness of Miss Hull the beautiful Grieg Sonata for piano and violin, 
and also a movement from the Mendelssohn violin concerto, had to be omitted. Mr. 
and Mrs. Vincent added some selections in place of the omitted numbers. 

The other members of the faculty are well known in Raleigh, where they have 
often been heard. 

Miss Dowd gave the Schumann Naehstuck, No. 4, and MacDowell's Shadow Dance 
in so finished a manner that she received most enthusiastic applause. 

The two Scriabine numbers were heard for the first time in Raleigh, and it made 
one wish they could hear more of this as yet little known Russian composer. Mrs. 
Irvine gave them an excellent interpretation, playing them with her usual dash and 
spirit. 

Miss Pixley possesses a smooth technique of considerable proportions and shows 
much taste and finish in her playing. Her rendition of the first movement of Grieg's 
Sonata, Op. 7, was a very clever performance. 

St. Mary's School is to be congratulated on having so excellent a musical faculty. 

The Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 

On Wednesday night, the 28th of November, the Epsilon Alpha Pi 
Literary Society gave its annual reception to its new members. The 
guests were met in the hall by the President of the Society, Miss Lillian 
Farmer, with her fellow officers : Misses Waddill, Hill, Battle, Roger- 
son and Self. From the hall they were ushered into the French room, 
which looked very dainty and pretty, with the decorations of green and 
white, and its many pennants on the walls. The ever-popular punch 
bowls were presided over by Misses Dotterer and Wells. Delightful 
refreshments were served by other members of the society. Among 
the guests were the new members, the faculty, Bishop Cheshire and 
his family, and the officers of the Sigma Lambda Literary Society. 
The President was untiring in her efforts to make the evening a 
pleasant one for all, and we think that she was very successful. 

ThanKsgiving. 

As is usual, Thanksgiving Day was begun by an early communion 
service in the chapel. Then came the special Thanksgiving Service 
at eleven o'clock, and at this service an offering was taken for the 
Thompson Orphanage. This offering, .we are glad to say, was a 
large one. 

Thanksgiving afternoon the increasing interest in athletics was 
manifested by a game of basket ball between the two organized teams. 
One of the teams was composed of girls from East Rock and Senior 



14- The St. Mary's Muse. 



Hall, the other of those from Main Building. There was good playing 
on both sides, but that of Marguerite Thompson and Eloise Kobinson 
was especially noticeable. The score was ten to three in favor of the 
team from Senior Hall and East Kock. 

Of course there are always many boxes at Thanksgiving, but this 
year there seemed to be more than usual. These were enjoyed by 
the girls in school. Those who had the pleasure of spending Thanks- 
giving away were Susan Bynum and Mary Wiggins at Chapel Hill, 
Bessie Watters at Hillsboro, Helen Liddell at Charlotte, Bliss Perry 
and Iris Mitchell at Franklin, Marie Koiner at Louisburg. Florence 
Beckwith enjoyed a short visit from her parents on Thanksgiving Day, 
and Natalie Dotterer spent the Sunday after with Kate Blacknall. 
Mrs. Andrews' Dinner Party. 

One of the events looked forward to every year is the dinner which 
Mrs. A. B. Andrews always gives to a party of St. Mary's girls. 
This year we had the pleasure of going on the Monday before Thanks- 
giving. Mrs. Andrews was charming and gracious, as usual, and the 
occasion was a most enjoyable one. 

The fortunate ones were Sallie Haywood Battle, Carile Weaver, 
Allene Gentry, Margaret Temple, Lela Jemison, Sidney Gabbett, 
Marie Koiner, Alice Moore, Jennie Bell Turner, Sadie Thomas, Lula 
Taliaferro, Josephine Gilmer, Emilie Campbell, Eliza Morton, Mary 
Shuford, Rebecca Clark, Nell Wilson, Rebe Shields and Georgia 
Hales. 

On this same afternoon Mrs. William Andrews entertained another 
party of St. Mary's girls at a Thanksgiving entertainment. 

Alpha Rho Literary Society. 

The Alpha Rho Literary Society of St. Mary's was organized De- 
cember 1st, 1906, for the pupils of the preparatory department, by 
Miss Thomas and the Seniors of that department. The name decided 
on was from the Greek letters for A. R., the initials of Abram Ryan, 
one of our greatest Southern poets. 

The officers nominated and elected by the girls were: president, 
May Hoke; vice-president, Carile Weaver; secretary, Bessie Arthur; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



treasurer, Margaret Pennington; critic, Ila Thompson; and tellers, 
Matilda Haughton and Iris Porter. 

The colors decided on were violet and white, and the flower, violet; 
the pin chosen was a. small diamond-shaped one, gold, with 'a black 
center bearing the Greek initials A. E. It was decided that the meet- 
ings should be held every Wednesday night. 

"For Love or Money." 

The play given by St. Elizabeth's Chapter on the evening of Satur- 
day, December the eighth, was a decided success. Each actress filled 
her role well. Sue Prince and Rosa Heath made excellent "suitors " 
while their sweethearts, Helen Strange and Sydney Gabett, acted their 
parts very naturally. Jessie Chapman was especially fine in the role 
of Mrs. Ambrose; Alice Munnerlyn made a very good maiden lady, 
and Nate he Dotterer was funny as the Irish maid. Last but not least, 
we should mention Eloise Robinson, who was an exceedingly attractive 
old Colonel On the whole, the play was one of the best ever given up 
here, and the girls deserve much credit for their energy and effort in 
making it so successful. 



School Notes. 



We were very glad to have Miss Kate Cheshire talk to us on Sun- 
day, the 18th. She told us of the work at Mayodan and of the Silver 
Jubilee to be held next May. We hope the junior auxiliary of St 
Mary's may be represented at this jubilee. 

We are glad to have Margaret Short back with us again after her 
short stay at home, called there by the death of her grandfather, Judge 
Mears. She has our sincere sympathy. 

Helen Gwyn was delighted to see her father Saturday, December 
1st, all the more because he took her home to spend a few days. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
Pbesident, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh, 
f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
„ I Mrs. I M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, j Mrs _ p p Tucker, Raleigh, 

[ Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Teeas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



The Saunders Memorial Window. 

Contributions to the Memorial Fund still continue to come in from 
day to day, making it seem probable that the Fund will be at least 
almost complete by Epiphany, the day of the dedication of the window. 
There is, however, as yet need of further contributions, and responses 
from those who are interested, but have not yet made their offering, 
will be much appreciated. 

The spirit that animates the givers can be caught in these extracts 
from letters accompanying gifts: 

"Enclosed please find my small contribution, which I gladly send to help put up 
dear Miss Anne's memorial window. Thank you for letting me know about it." 

"Am glad you thought of me when writing to the old St. Mary's girls, for I feel 
it quite a privilege to contribute to such an object." 

"Thank you for giving me the opportunity to make even a very small offering 
to an object which has my entire sympathy. Any tribute to Miss Saunders is grati- 
fying to those whose privilege it was to know and to honor her." 

"I was so delighted to see that the Muse was getting up a fund to erect a memorial 
window to Miss Anne — whom we all loved so much. It really must not be the same 
at all there without her." 

"I gladly send this little token of my love and friendly feeling for any object 
connected with St. Mary's. I was a student there for but one year, but have most 
pleasant memories of Miss Saunders, who did such a noble work in the school." 

"I wish it could be many times more than this little sum, which I am grateful to 
be given the opportunity to send." 

"I am very sorry that I can only send three dollars, but that is all that I have 
left of my November allowance. With best wishes for the success of any and every- 
thing that the Muse undertakes." 



The St. Maey's Muse. 17 



Some Much Appreciated Letters. 



"Londonderry," Easton, Md. 

Your letter and the copies of the Muse have certainly given me a 
great deal of pleasure. I have missed the Muse all year, but not 
having a permanent address, I didn't send for it. Now I wish to re- 
new my subscription. We now have a country place where we expect 
to spend the greater part of the year; in winter I'm supposed to be 
in Wilmington, N. C. 

I saw Miss Fenner in Baltimore the other day and she told me a 
good deal of St. Mary's news. I get so lonesome for the place, and 
hope to visit there soon again. We had a good many girls from there 
at school in Baltimore last year, and we certainly sighed for St. Mary's. 
" * * Do send me the Muse; each copy seems more interesting 
than the last. With best wishes for success, 

Very sincerely, 

Heloise Beebe. 



Hotel Ansonia, 73d and Broadway, New York. 
Let me say, that to me the Muse is not "small." It just fills a 
great big gap in the life of the ex-St, Mary's girl, and I'm glad to 
herewith renew my subscription. 

At present I am at the head of the Mental Defectives in Public 
School Number 1, the most up-to-date school in the Lower East Side. 
I have just returned from several months' work along this line in 
England, Germany and France. * * * 
With all sorts of good wishes for the Muse, 

Sincerely, 
Harriet Page Weie. 

Eidgeway, S. C, Nov. 30th. 
Please let the enclosed assure me the visitations of the Muse for 
another year, and place me among those contributing to Miss Saunders' 
window. I trust that I am not too late to be numbered with the latter 1 . 



13 The St. Mary's Muse. 



If I could at any time assist you in news items I should, of course, 
be glad to be of any help. Rita is studying stenography and type- 
writing at McEeat's Business College, in Columbia. Rosa Thomas, 
Isabel, Ret and Floy Ruff are doing nothing in particular — at home, 
I believe, for the winter. My two months' assistance at Winthrop is 
ended. 

With the good wishes of the season, Cordially, 

Kate deR. Mears. 



Edenton, Nov. 14, 1906. 
The Mission Herald wishes to express to its friend the Muse sincere 
appreciation and thanks for a copy of the opening number. We have 
read it through with pleasure and profit, and we hope it will repeat 
its visit from time to time. 

With best wishes for a happy and successful year, we remain, as ever, 

Your sincere friend, 

The Mission Herald. 
W. E. Cox, Editor. 



• ' Portsmouth, Va., Nov. 30th. 

* * * I am so glad the next number of the Muse is to be an 
Alunmse number. I have been wanting to write a long time to tell 
you all what a pleasure the Muse is to me and how well I think you 
are doing. Long may it prosper ! 

I have a few interesting notes for you. I was in Ridgeway, 1ST. C, 
November 21st, when Janet Hawkins, an old St. Mary's girl, was 
married to Mr. M. M. Pendleton, of Warrenton, K C. All the at- 
tendants were old St. Mary's School girls — Lucy Bridgers, of Wilming- 
ton, being maid-of-honor, and Margaret Pruden and Sophie Wood, of 
Edenton; Belle Nash, of Tarboro; Mattie Jones, of Warrenton; Mar- 
garet Bridgers, of Wilmington, and I, being the bridesmaids. 

Perhaps you don't know, too, that Mattie Hunter is at the Peabody 
Conservatory of Music in Baltimore this winter. 

My best wishes for you all from St. Mary's loyal daughter, 

Mary Holton Hunter. 



The St. Maby's Muse. 19 



An Alumnae Tribute 



My dear Editors: 

Ever since the alumnse numbers of the Muse have been coming out I 
have wanted to "put my finger in the pie," and when I opened the 
October number and read the dear, familiar prayer on the first page, 
such a host of memories came to me that I was glad I could give 
vent to them through a letter in the next alumnae number. I can shut 
my eyes and see the little Chapel (it was then) with so many restive 
girls marching in — some lagging along in line, some late, a number 
rushing in at the last minute — then the morning service and dear 
Dr. Bratton's voice in the familiar prayer. I think the Chapel is the 
dearest place of all in our hearts. I am so glad to see that the 
Memorial Window is to be placed there in memory of Miss Anne 
Saunders. She was such a true, faithful worker for St, Mary's 
daughters. 

I think the Muse has done splendid work, and is getting better each 
year. I only hope it is doing better in a financial way. I can't 
understand any loyal daughter of St. Mary's not taking the Muse, 
for it is such a pleasure to me to be able to keep up with old girls 
and everything else connected with the school life. I know those same 
old girls will envy me when I tell them I am going out to Mississippi 
in January and expect to see Dr. Bratton (I never can think of him 
as anything else) very often. 

I suppose it will be Christmas before this number appears, so will 
stop with warmest greetings for the old year and the new for all St. 
Mary's daughters and for the Muse, which keeps us bonded together. 

Yours loyally, 

213 Middle St. Maky H. Hunter. 



20 The St. Mart's Mttse. 



WEDDINGS OF THE MONTH- 



Sasser-Faison. 

There was a lovely wedding celebrated November 3d at six o'clock at Edenton St. 
Methodist Church when Miss Ellen John Faison became the bride of Mr. John 
William Sasser, both of this city. The church was filled with relatives and friends 
of the young couple. 

The decorations were in ferns and palms arranged in front of the pulpit in 
artistic grouping, and before the entry of the bridal party some exquisite musical 
selections were rendered by Mr. Wade R. Brown, who later gave the wedding march 
from Lohengrin as the processional, while the recessional was Mendelssohn's wed- 
ding march. The vows were given by Rev. R. F. Bumpass, pastor of the church, who 
used the ring ceremony. 

The bride entered with her father, Mr. Frank S. Faison, who gave her away, and 
she was handsomely attired in a creation of angel crepe, elaborately trimmed with 
real lace, princess, entraine. She wore a bridal veil and carried a shower boquet 
of bride's roses and lilies of the valley. The groom entered with his best man, his 
brother, Mr. Edward Sasser. 

The bride is a most cultured and attractive young woman, a daughter of Mr. 
Frank S. Faison, of Northampton County, and she has many friends throughout the 
State and in Raleigh, where she has resided. She is a graduate of both St. Mary's 
and the University of North Carolina. 

Pendleton -HawKins. 

Ridgeway, N. C, Nov. 21. — There took place this afternoon at half after two 
o'clock, at "Oakley Hall," the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Marmaduke Hawkins, the 
marriage of their lovely daughter, Miss Janet McKenzie Hawkins, and Mr. Milo M. 
Pendleton. There were many friends and relatives in attendance, and the beautiful 
home was most artistically decorated for the happy event, the occasion being a most 
delightful one. 

Wiggin-Cotten. 

Greenville, N. C, Nov. 21.— At high noon to-day, at "Cottondale," the country 
home of Col. and Mrs. R. R. Cotten, their daughter, Miss Sallie Dromgoole Cotten, 
and Mr. Russell Benjamin Wiggin, of Brookline, Mass., were married, the ceremony 
being performed by Rev. Wm. E. Cox, rector of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, of 
Greenville. 

The best man was Mr. Preston Sims Cotten, of Norfolk, Va., brother of the bride, 
and the dame of honor was Mrs. Julian Timberlake, of Raleigh, sister of the bride. 

The bride's maids were Miss Elba Cotten, sister of the bride, Cottondale, N. C, 
Miss Mary Gottlieb, of Baltimore, and Misses Emily and Maisie Wiggin, sisters of 
the groom, of Brookline. 

The bride's dress was of white duchess satin trimmed with point lace and pearls, 
and she carried a shower boquet of lilies of the valley. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



The dresses of the bridesmaids were white dotted chiffon over white taffeta with 
white picture hats and yellow plumes, and each carried yellow chrysanthemums. 

Following the ceremony a reception was held at Cottondale from 12 to 4 p. m. 
The bride and groom were assisted in receiving by the bridal party and members of 
the house party who had been participating in the ante wedding festivities at Cotton- 
dale the past week: Miss Nan Clark, Tarboro, N. C; Miss Eleanor Wesson, 
Springfield, Mass.; Miss Gertrude Sullivan, Savannah, Ga.; Miss May and Miss Jane 
Boyden, Salisbury, N. C; Miss Winnie Skinner, Greenville, N. C; Miss Louise Holt 
Graham, N. C. 

The decorations of the chapel on the lawn at Cottondale were white and yellow 
flowers and evergreens, and the residence in evergreens, pines and chrysanthemums. 

The bride and groom will make their residence at Hopton Court, Brookline, Mass. 

The bride is a young woman of fine culture and charming personality. She is a 
great favorite socially, her popularity extending over many States. 

McMillan-Slocomb. 

Fayetteville, N. C— On Thursday evening, December 6th, Mr. Benjamin McMillan, 
of Mobile, Ala., was married to Miss Mary Hinsdale Slocomb, second daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Haven Slocomb, at their home on Dick street, the Rev. Isaac 
Wayne Hughes, rector of St. John's Episcopal Church, performing the ceremony. 
Because of recent bereavements in the families of the contracting parties, only their 
families and relatives were present. The house was handsomely decorated for the 
occasion. 

Gowned in princess en train of all-over lace, with veil and orange blossoms, the 
bride entered on the arm of her father at half-past eight o'clock. She carried an 
exquisite shower boquet of lilies of the valley. She was preceded by the maid of 
honor, Miss Marion Winslow Slocomb, her sister, who was dressed in nile green, pan 
silk. The wedding march was played by Mrs. I. W. Hughes. Master William Glover 
was the acolite; and little Misses Frances Green, niece of the groom, and Louise 
Slocomb, the bride's niece, held the ribbon in the formation of an aisle. The groom 
was attended by his cousin, Mr. Daniel Bliss McMillan, of Savannah, as best man. 

Both the bride and groom are deservedly popular in society circles here, where 
Mr. McMillan lived until a year or so ago. They will make their home in Mobile, 
where he is in the copper business, a member of the firm of McMillan Bros. 

Rose-Shaffer. 

There was a pretty home wedding celebrated at half-past eleven o'clock yesterday 
morning, December 12th, at the home of Mrs. A. W. Shaffer, on South Fayetteville 
street, when her daughter, Miss Ethel Augusta Shaffer, became the bride of Mr. Gar- 
land R. Rose, of Durham. 

The parlor was artistically decorated with ferns and holly, and here the vows were 
given by Rev. Samuel Hanff. The bride was given away by her brother, Mr. Elmer 
M. Shaffer. Only relatives and a few intimate friends were present. 

The bride is a daughter of the late Col. A. W. Shaffer, and is a most charming 
young woman. The groom is a prominent young architect of Durham, and each 
have a large circle of friends, the many handsome wedding presents attesting the 
high esteem in which they are held. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Ashe-Wilcox. 

On Wednesday, December 11, 1906, in Emanuel Episcopal Church, at Bristol, Tenn., 
by Rev. Dr. Russell, William Willard Ashe, of Raleigh, and Mrs. Margaret Henry 
Wilcox, of Ashe County, North Carolina. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ashe left at once for Washington City, where they will make their 
future home. 

Dr. and Mrs. A. M. Lee 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter, 

Allie Moseley, 

to 

Mr. Archibald McLean Graham, 

on Wednesday afternoon the twelfth of December, 

nineteen hundred and six, 

at five o'clock, 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 

Clinton, North Carolina. 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of Thr Musb generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RAL.EIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 



TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

BEMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



St. Mary's Souvenir Postals, 

St. Mary's 1907 Calendars, 

St. Mary's Pennants, 

Can be procured by writing to The Muse. 



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guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



¥. C. STRONACE'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTBVILLE STREET 

KING-CROWELI/S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



A Rhyme. 

I sat and pondered hour by hour, 

"Oh, give me words, which I may use, 
To write a tale of love or power," 

I fervently besought my Muse. 

To tell a tale of heroes brave, 

(As bards of all the ages choose,) 
Who risked their all, some maid to save, 

Or simply something to amuse. 

At last my ardent prayer was heard, 

Words came to me by ones and twos — 
A tale of gallantry unheard 

Was published next month in the Muse. 

Helen Katherine Liddell. 



THE BOYLAN-PEftRCE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



.ROSENTHAL 
SCO. 

GROCKRS 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STRIBT 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing: Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 P. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 



J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 



WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLYERTHOEN Co., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



A SLAM. 

The chill December days have come, 
As they have come of yore, 

And once again we hear the cry: 
"Say ! will-yoii-shnt-that-door ! 



A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 



Prvate Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



H 



STEINMETZ, 
_ FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 
Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 

ROBTjjI MPjjON, ""-KSfiSas «■ ! 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 
Kodak work of all kinds. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms, 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Use t he best: THE WELSBACR LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



TO BE STJKE. 

"When is Christmas coming, father?" 
"Buy and buy." 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, 29", C. 
(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 

BARRETT & THOMPSON— Architects 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

116% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

"PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY. General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleigh, N. C 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 

Capital 815,000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
$600,00 0. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 
132 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 

TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

OAK CITY STEAM LAUNDRY. 

Promptness and Neatness with all work. 

Marshall & West, Props. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 
107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N: C. 
Capital, 8225,000. Surplus and Profits, 8115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
•afe, place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 



If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B MANN, 
All Phones. Groceries. 11 E. Hargett St. 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOL'S Shoe Store. 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



JOHN C. DREWRY. 
'MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 
Assets, 



% 100,000.00 

lOO.OOO.OO 

1,175,000.00 

1.500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. n * 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY 

All Sorts of Building Supplies. 

RALEIGH, N. C. ' 




Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
JDentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D. T. JOHNSON & SONS. 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St 



Mi.-SES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, I906-'07. 



DECEMBER- JANUARY. 



Dee. 15, Saturday, 8 p. m— St. Catherine's Chapter in "Alice in Wonderland." 
Dec. 19, Wednesday, 7:30 p. m. — Joint Meeting of the Literary Societies. "Carolina 

Day" Program. 
8:30 p. m. — Muse Club. Christmas Celebration. 

Dec. 20, Thursday. — Christmas Holiday begins at 1 p. m. 

******* 
Jan. 3, Thursday. — Holiday ends at 6 p. m. 

Jan. 6, Sunday— Epiphany— 5 p. m.— Dedication of the Saunders Memorial Window. 
Jan. 12, Saturday, 8 p. m.— St. Margaret's Chapter in "A Night in Bohemia." 
Jan. 17-23. — Examination Week. 
Jan. 24, Thursday.— EASTER TERM BEGINS. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West . 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. , 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or a,ddress 

C. H. OATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD F COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, Second Vice-President } 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



The Student Directory, I906-'07. 



The St. Mary's Muse Staff. 



ANNUAL. 

(Under direction of Senioi Class. 

I/illian Farmer, Editor.in-Chief. 
Emily Garrison, Business Manager. 
IiOuise Hill, T 

Helen Ball) 11 ' [ Literary Editors. 

Beatrice Cohen, J 

Sue Prince, ) 

Heber Birdsong, V Art Editors. 

Alice McCullers, ) 



MONTHLT. 

(Under direction of Muse Club.) 

Serena Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 
Beatrice Cohen, Act. Bus. Mgr 
Elizabeth Waddill. 
Helen Liddell. 
Helen Strange. 

Lillian Farmer. Alice McCullers. 

Emily Carrison. Georgia Hales. 

Mary Spruill. Louise Hill. 

Sue Prince. Mary Vann. 

Margaret DuBose Eloise Robinso 



Managing 
Board. 



EFSILON ALPHA PI. 



The Literary Societies. 



SIGMA LAMBDA. 



-Gillian farmer Pre^irlpnt «,-. t>™ 

Eva Roe-prsnn secretary Emily Carrison. 

S^ltieH pittiV ~F. Treasurer Helen Liddell. 

Loule^m!"!." Corresponding Secretary Serena Bailey. 

Frankie Self.... ~~~~ "Historian fS&^SP" 

Annie Wells 1 aisiorian Alice Corbett. 

Kate Blacknall } Tellers {SS^SSSS^ 00 - 

The Auxiliary Chapters. 
General Directress Miss McKimmon. 



ST. CATHERINE'S. 

Miss Thomas, Directress. 
Louise Hill, President. 
Jessie Harris, Treasurer. 
Emily Carrison, Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S. 

Miss Cribbs, Directress. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, President. 
Mabel Willis, Vice-President. 
Matilda Haughton, Treasurer. 
Bettie Sturgeon, Secretary. 

ST. MONICA'S. 

Miss McKimmon, Directress. 
Elizabeth Waddill, President. 
Janie DuBose, Vice-President. 
Lyman Grimsley, Treasurer. 
Chevilette Kinloch, Secretary. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S. 

Mrs. Vincent, Directress. 

Susan Bynum, President. 

Alice Munnerlyn, Secretary-Treasurer 



ST. ANNE'S. 

Miss Sutton, Directress. 
Eva Rogerson, President. 
Blanche Robinson, Vice-President. 
Mary Vann, Treasurer. 
Minnie Leary, Secretary. 

ST. ETHELDREDA'S 

Miss Spann, Directress. 

Sarah Jones, President. 

Katharine Henderson, Vice-President 

Alice Corbett, Treasurer. 

Marguerite Short. Secretary. 



Location Central for the Ca rolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 



65th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1906. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 24, 1907. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's ) Z THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these \ 3 * THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
Departments: j ± THE ARJ SCHQ0L 

5. THE PRE PARA TOR Y SCHO OL. 






In 1906-07 are enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Ste'mway Grand Pianos. 

i« .f P l c ) a \ at l en l ion to theSoc;al and Christian- side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. w 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. S., B. D. 

RECTOR. 



Bptpban? fhimber 




i*)&i*r^ ' s**t#' - 



ry'e Mmc 



tfttiVto®, 1907 



M 



ib, m. <r. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



EPIPHANY NUMBER. 



Vol. XL January, 1907. No. 6. 



To Lee at Appomattox. 



MARY E. SPANN. 



Our hearts gladly bow to the glorious leader, 
Triumphant while furling the flag of the gray, 

Naught could e'er conquer thy spirit, oh never, 
Even while sheathing thy sword and for aye. 

Brilliant as were thy earlier triumphs, 

Incomparably great in the annals of years — 

No blemish e'er touched the sword of our chieftain, 
Spotless the armor we see through our tears. 

What though the laurels of earth are all scattered, 
And thy heart is now pierced by adversity's rod?- 

Greatness eternal thy spirit enshrineth, 
Thy brow is o'erhung by a halo of God. 



Robert E. Lee. 



LILLIAN HATJSEB FARMER. 



Eobert Edward Lee, soldier, gentleman and Christian, was born at 
Stratford, Virginia, on January 19, 1807. And now, though a hun- 
dred years have passed, his deeds and noble life are remembered where- 
ever his name is known. 

Born of gentle people and with a loving mother for his childhood 
companion, it is only natural that he should have developed into the 
noble, courteous Christian gentleman that he was. 

In school he always did well, and when at eighteeen he went to West 
Point for a soldier's training, he studied so well and was so distinguished 
•in his deportment that he graduated with second honor. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



A few years later he joined the Engineer Corps of the United States 
Army. He quickly rose in rank, and when the Mexican War broke out 
he took an active part. His deeds of bravery were often commented on 
in the reports of General Scott, and won him no little favor. After the 
Mexican War, he became a cavalry officer, and though continually away 
from home, his family was always present in his thoughts. In one of 
his letters he writes : "Though absent my heart will be in the midst of 
you. I can do nothing but love and pray for you." 

In 1861, that war too terrible for words, began. The time came 
when each man must decide for himself; when brother must fight 
against brother and father against son. 

The great and noble heart of Lee was sorely troubled at the condition 
of his dear country. He loved the Union, but he could not fight against 
his native State. After a great struggle he resigned his commission in 
the United States Army and identified himself with the Southern States. 
He drew his sword not in the cause of slavery — he did not seek to over- 
throw the government of the United States; but he drew his sword 
merely in the defence of constitutional liberty. 

The military skill of this our greatest general during the sad war that 
followed is well known ; suffice it to say that he was the life and soul of 
his army. No commander was ever more careful of his men, and never 
were soldiers more devoted to their commander. The feeling for him 
was love. There was no condescension in his manner, but he was simple, 
kind and sympathetic. His devoted soldiers trusted him as a leader, 
and they almost worshipped him as a man. To them he represented 
a cause, country and all. 

Throughout the war he did what he believed was his duty. When the 
surrender at Appomattox was inevitable, he did what was the only* 
thing left for him to do, and in tears bade farewell to his army. 

After the surrender he was offered gifts and positions of honor and 
distinction, but he modestly declined all. When an English nobleman 
desired him to accept a mansion and estate, he replied, "I cannot desert 
my native State in the hour of adversity." 

Always loyal to duty and "the cause," he accepted the Presidency o: 
Washington College and brought about many improvements in the col- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



lege and campus. His moral influence had its effect on the students, 
and his character was impressed upon the college, both in the general 
departments arid in detail. He remained President of the college until 
October the twelfth, 1870, when the soul of this pure Christian went 
from this earth to its glorious rest. 

What Lee wrote of Stuart may likewise be said of him: "He was 
second to none in valor, zeal and unflinching devotion to his country. 
To military capacity of a high order and to the noble virtues of the 
soldier he added the brighter graces of a pure life, guided and sustained 
by Christian faith and hope." 



The Star. 

MAEY C. SHUFORD. 



On the flat roof of an eastern house a man paced back and forth. 
In his white robes, and with the last rays of the sinking sun tingeing his 
snow white hair and long, flowing beard, he seemed something purer 
and higher than mere man. But a frown came and went on his broad 
brow, and in his grey eyes, stern and piercing, lay a troubled look. The 
children, running home in the growing dusk, dropped their voices to 
subdued whispers as they passed by, for they held in awe and reverence 
Artaban — wise man of the East. 

Lost in thought he noticed nothing — neither the children nor the 
deepening twilight— until a low "Father" met his ear. Turning, he 
greeted with one of his rare smiles the beautiful young girl who stepped 
up on the roof. Like yet unlike him in feature, she had the same grey 
eyes and broad brow, but her loose, flowing hair, reaching almost to" the 
ground, was jet black as a raven's wing. 

"Thou hast been troubled all the day. Father. What is it?" she 
asked. 

The Magian sighed wearily. "I know not, Rachel, except there is 
naught but doubt in my heart." 

"Tell me why." 

"As thou wilt, though thou hast heard this story oft before. You 
remember I told thee how, when I was but a little lad, my father took 



The St. Mary's Muse. 






me with him on that long journey to the Temple, and how there one of 
the priests called me blessed and prophesied thatl should offer gifts unto 
a Messiah. As thou knowest, since that day, long gone by, I have treas- 
ured the prophecy in my heart; it is my hope and longing day and 
night — my supreme desire. 

•'But how many long nights have I watched the heavens for a sign — 
in vain? My gifts are ready, but where is the Great King? I am 
growing old and infirm while waiting, and my life is almost spent, but 
yet there is no sign of His coming. And I feel to-night as if I shall 
never see Him ; my faith is gone. I fear I have in some way offended 
the good God and He counts me not worthy to have this great blessing." 

Surely, if there is any one fit to worship Him, it would be the wisest 
and godliest man in all the East," answered his daughter. "What 
couldst thou have done, Father, for thou hast never done wrong to man 

or God." 

"Not to do so has ever been my utmost endeavor," said the sage, "but 
I would fain know why these doubts and fears are oppressing me. Death 
would be gladly welcomed if my hope of seeing some great Redeemer 

be gone." - 

"Dear Father," said the girl, "Look out upon the night, how starry 
and beautiful— the earth, how calm and still. Hast thou lost faith in 
the omnipotent God who created all this \ Surely, He who has always 
kept His promise to our forefathers wilt not forget His promise to thee. 
He will come — the King will come before thou diest. He shall receive 
thy gifts and let thee die in peace. Only have faith and thou shalt 

see Him." 

The Magian bowed his head. Then, as Rachel watched him with 
anxious face, he drew her to him, and kissing her on the brow, said, 
"The God of all goodness bless thee, my daughter ; thou art my help and 
comfort, my staff in mine old age. Thy words have given me faith and 
hope once more. I will never doubt again." 

And then it was that Rachel, white with awe, caught his robe, with a 

cr y "Father! look ! look ! What means that?" For over in the East 

there shone a wondrous star. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



The Dandelion; 

ELIZABETH T. WADDILL. 

Once a little dandelion 

In a corner grew; 
Small and weak, but very bright, 

Did the best it knew. 

If anyone passed near its nook, 
The flower looked up and smiled 

Many a weary, aching heart 
From trouble it beguiled. 

A little child came toddling out 
From a house across the way — 

Just a mite of three or four, 
Wishing but to play. 

As she reached the road-way wide, 
A team swung into view; 

Fast it came; it could not swerve; 
Naught there seemed to do. 

Just in time the little child 
Spied the blossom sweet — 

Ran across to gather it, 
Missed the horses' feet. 

Nothing strange that mother fond, 

Picking baby up, 
Prayed a fervent blessing on 

The flower's yellow cup. 



s Muse. 



,- , . +■ r-*~~ v =.*..- = One Dollar. 

Subscription, One Year. = - - v 

c- wi r«~~s~i, = = Fifteen Cents. 

Single Copies, = *- 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alamnie, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address ah communications and send all subscriptions^ ^ ^^ ^^ 

Correspondence from friends solicited. baleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Serena C. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. Beatrice Bollmas Cohen, Acting Business Manager. 

Sue Brent Price, Elizabeth Waddill. Helen Strange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Louise Hill. 



EDITORIAL. 



The New Year. 



It has been well said that every man has two birthdays: "two days 
at least, in every year, which set him upon revolving the lapse of time, 
as it afreets his 1 moral duration." The one is his special birthday; the 
other, the beginning of the New Year. 

Is it not a beautiful idea, if we stop to consider it, that at certain 
times we strive to forget all that lies behind us, and resolve with greater 
earnestness and determination to live rightly the life that God has 
allotted us? Resolutions, however, it has been argued, are a waste of 
time, for, alas, we break them only too often. But the very resolutions 
themselves, do they count for nothing? Are we to be judged only by 
the success that we achieve, or by the earnestness, the effort we use to 
obtain that success? Our intentions, our noble resolutions, though we 
may not always fulfill them, show that we are trying to grow into a 
more nearly perfect man or woman. 

« 'Tis not what man Does which exalts him, but what man Would do! " 
A few things, at least, let us do this year: to try to forget our own 
annoyances and troubles; to help other people in forgetting theirs; and 

< 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



to see, appreciate and love the beautiful in God's world and in the 
hearts of our neighbors. 

And now, the Muse wishes each of its readers the happiest and 
brightest kind of a new year ! 



Robert E. Lee. 



"'Of those immortal dead who live again 
In minds made better by their presence." 

It is only fitting- that the Muse should devote a part of this number to 
commemorating the centennial anniversary of the birth of Lee. All 
over the Southern States, indeed in the hearts of loyal Southerners, 
wherever they may be, the nineteenth of January is kept as a day of 
peculiar and tender interest and reverence. For is it not the birthday 
of the greatest Southerner, not only the wonderful general, but also the 
sublime man ? His was a character and life that any country might be 
proud to claim; his biography, indeed, has infinitely enriched the his- 
tory of the world. 

The Southland has been greatly blessed with the glorious gift of this 
son; the remembrance of his strength and greatness of work and char- 
acter will always remain as an example that the noblest men of suc- 
ceeding ages will do well to follow. 



The Saunders Memorial. 

In a word of final comment on the placing of the Saunders Memorial 
Window in the Chapel, a work which has claimed the loving interest of 
many alumnae, students and friends during the early months of the ses- 
sion, and which was completed with the dedication of the window at 
'Epiphany, the following extract from an editorial in The Outlook of 
December 8, is timely and inspiring as well, stating, as it does, the 
reasons which animate the donors in this as in all other true memorials:' 
To be surrounded by the visible memorials of those who have gone before is to to 
have continually present the sense of the unbroken life of the race, of the line of 
descent from parent to child in continuous generations, of the unity of those who 
have passed through the education of earth and those who are learning its lessons as 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



bqst they can, of the fellowship of that invisible host of witnesses which gives human 
struggle its immense spiritual significance. As children ought everywhere to read the 
story, not of their country's wealth and power, but of its heroes, its courage, its 
achievements in the emancipation of the human spirit, so ought every child to come 
into consciousness of the ties that bind the latest to the earliest men and women in 
vital and unescapable relationship in the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of 
Christ, by memorials on every side of those who have made life great, rich, pure, 

ender,' and fruitful. If they whom we call the dead have escaped out of sleep and 
Ire now alive in a fullness of life which "it hath not entered into the mind of man 
to conceive," then, surely, they who remain to endure and struggle toward the light 

.ught to be lifted up by the companionship of the vast company who have achieved 
/reedom and harmony of deed with thought and of reality with vision. 



SCHOOL NEWS- 



Georgia Stanton Hales, '09, Editor. 



D 



The Resignation of the Rector. 

All other news of the month at St. Mary's has been well nigh lost 
sight of in consideration of the resignation of Mr. DuBose from the 
Rectorship, announcement of which was made shortly after the holidays 
were over. The resignation, which takes effect at the close of the 
resent school year, came as a complete surprise. 

The reasons for the resignation are stated briefly in the News and 
Observer of January 8th, as follows : 

Dr. DuBose states that he resigns not because of any lack of interest in St. Mary's, 

' ut because the details of work as the president of the school keep him from giving 

hat attention to ministerial functions which to him comes first. Though he will 

eave St. Mary's, it will still have his love and he will continue to take deep interest 

in it. 

Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, in speaking last night of Dr. DuBose's resignation, 
tated that there was absolutely no friction, but that Dr. DuBose for a year had 
ontemplated this step. He says that Dr. DuBose as Rector of St. Mary's has done 

efficient and faithful work, and is held in the highest esteem both because of his work 
;nd because of his splendid personal qualities; that the school under Dr. DuBose 

has had its greatest prosperity and success; that Dr. DuBose's resignation is a 
natter of deep distress to all, but that Dr. DuBose found the business details of the 
. ork took too much of his time, and he could not give proper attention to ministerial 

i uties. 

Dr. DuBose came to St. Mary's as Hector four years ago, in September, 1903. For 
fifteen years previously he had been Rector of the Episcopal church at Asheville, and 



The St. Maby's Muse. 



for hve years before this at Union, S. C. He is an able and accomplished preacher 
and has been greatly successful here, where he has won many friends. He has made 
no plans for future work, nor have any steps been taken as to a successor for him 
This will probably be arranged at a meeting of the Board of Directors of St. Mary's 
in May. J 

Mr. DuBose succeeded Dr. Bratton as Rector in September, 1903, 
and is now completing his fourth year as head of the school. These 
years have been bright ones in the history of St. Mary's, and under the 
energetic and painstaking direction of the Rector the school has thrived 
and improved in many ways. 

The Saunders Memorial Window Dedicated. 
A beautiful and impressive service was held in the chapel at St. 
Mary's Sunday afternoon at the feast of the Epiphany. After singing 
two stanzas of the hymn, 

"Hark! the sound of holy voices, 
Chanting at the crystal sea," 

A window bearing the simple inscription, 

In Memoriam 

ANNE SAUNDERS. 

April 26, 1837. May 29, 1906. 

was dedicated to this faithful friend whose life had been so long and so 
lovingly given to the interests of St, Mary's. 

The window was made by Misses Wickham and Stone, of New York. 
The design is chiefly floral, consisting of purple clematis and passion 
flowers. A cross half hidden is pointing upward, and in the distance 
there is the faint suggestive beauty of a sunset sky. The window looks 
to the west, and during this evening service the rich coloring of purple 
and green, together with the soft vanishing tints, were brought into 
exquisite fullness by the sunset light. The chancel was beautiful in its 
Christmas green, and illumined by what seemed innumerable tapers. 
Above all was the Star of Bethlehem, fit emblem of that star which 
guides our feet until safe within the Paradise of God. 

There are three other memorial windows in the chapel. One was 
dedicated on All Saints Day, nineteen hundred, to Miss Elizabeth Bat- 
tle, a graduate of St. Mary's, and afterward Lady Principal of her 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Alma Mater. This window has Easter lilies at its base, and a vine 
bearing clusters of ripe fruit growing upward until its tendrils vanish 

in the sky. 

During Commencement week, two years ago, a window was dedi- 
cated to Mrs. Jane Ellis Bossell, a graduate of St. Mary's and daughter 
of Governor Ellis, who was in office at the beginning of the Civil War. 
The design is the Good Shepherd bearing the lamb safe into the fold. 

The chancel window is in memory of Mrs. Aldert Smedes, wife of the 
founder of St. Mary's. This window is very beautiful with its white 
lilies and the overshadowing angel of the Annunciation. These and 
many other memorials speak most eloquently of consecrated lives here 
in the old school of St, Mary's, that have striven to ease the burden of 
the world. j 

"May I reach 
That purest heaven, be to other souls 
The cup of strength in some great agony, 
Enkindle generous ardor, feed pure love, 
Beget the smiles that have no cruelty — 
Be the sweet presence of a good diffused, 
And in diffusion ever more intense. 
So shall I join the choir invisible, 
Whose music is the gladness of the world." 

"Alice in Wonderland." 

The play given by St. Katherine's Chapter of the Junior Auxiliary 
on Saturday night, December 15th, was a great success in every way. 
It was "Alice in Wonderland," the classic always funny and always 
dear to young and old. 

The stage was appropriately and prettily arranged in every scene: 
first as a forest with its pines and other evergreens ; then as a dining- 
room with its long tea table, which was "always set for tea" ; and, lastly, 
as a court with thrones for the king and queen. 

Each girl's role seemed to suit her excellently ; therefore the play was 
well acted. 

Lillian Farmer as Alice, Nell Wilson as the Hatteb, Beatrice 
Cohen as the Mock Turtle, and Kainsford DuBose as the Dormouse 
were especially good. The other characters were as follows: 



The St. Maky's Muse. n 



Emily Carrison Kin<*. 

Louise Hill Queen. 

Elizabeth Waddill White Rabbit. 

Marguerite LeCron Duchess. 

Marguerite Thompson March Hare. 

Jessie Jennings Cheshire Cat. 

Julia Melntyre Cook 

Mary Spruill Gryphon. 

Isabel Hanna Executioner. 

Alice McCullers Knave of Hearts. 

Alice Corbett Guard 

Miss Thomas and the girls of her chapter deserve congratulations 
both for the choice of the play and its rendition. 

The Mclver Meeting. 

On Wednesday night, December, 19th, the three literary societies 
were hosts in the first Inter-Society meeting of the year. The exercises 
were in lieu of those usually held on Carolina Day, and the program 
was arranged from the exercises for Carolina Day prepared by the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

This was the first appearance in public of official representatives of 
the Alpha Eho, along with those from the older societies. Lillian Far- 
mer, '07, President of Epsilon Alpha Pi, presided at the meeting, while 
Sue Prince, '07, and May Hoke, '11, Presidents of Sigma Lambda and 
Alpha. Rho, respectively, were seated with her. Emily Carrison, '07, 
Sigrm. Lambda, was Secretary. 

Fol.owing the singing of ''Carolina," the President opened the meet- 
ing will some appropriate remarks, after which the program, commem- 
orating the life of Dr. Mclver, was rendered. Serena Bailey and Helen 
Strange took part for Sigma Lambda ; Frankie Self and Elizabeth Wad- 
dill spoke for Epsilon Alpha Pi, and Carile Weaver represented 
Alpha Rho. 

The Faculty and students, boarders and day pupils, were invited to 
the meeting and all would have been there but that the very bad weather 
kept many of these living at a distance at their homes. 

Immediately following the meeting the guests were invited to adjourn 
to the Studio, where the Christmas entertainment proper was held. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Muse Christmas Tree. 

At the close of the inter-society meeting on Wednesday, December 
the nineteenth, the student body was cordially invited to the Studio by 
the Muse Club. Imagine the surprise, when, upon entering, we saw a 
brilliant Christmas tree. The entire Studio was changed from its 
every-day look by the decorations of holly and cedar. After waiting 
in silence for a moment, voices were heard in the distance, and the 
music drew nearer and nearer as the hidden chorus (under the direction 
of Miss Dowd) sang, first, "the Wassail Song," and then, "God Rest 
You Merry Gentlemen" — two very old English carols. 

Miss Cribbs gave, as the second number, a very beautiful reading, 
"A Miner's Christmas," which filled all hearts with a sense of the re- 
sponsibility and pathos of the Christmas-tide. 

Next some wandering musicians came and stopped to sing a Christ- 
mas hymn to the heart music of "Drink to me only with thine eyes." 
It was somewhat difficult to recognize in their quaint beggar costunes 
Miss Margaret DuBose, who had her violin, and the singers, Ruth New- 
bold and Nathalie Dotterer. 

The blowing of horns and the jingling of bells came in the mirgled 
melody of the Christmas-tide, as two gorgeously dressed heralds (Sue- 
Prince and Helen Strange) entered, followed by Santa Clans with his 
pack. At first the little children were almost too frightened to wecome 
their old friend of many generations, but he soon won their confidence, 
and taking their hands all danced gaily round the tree, as they saag, "I 
saw three ships come sailing in." 

The song finished, Santa Clans proceeded to the distribution of the 
sifts in his pack. All were of a humorous nature and the little speech 
which accompanied each caused the audience great delight, as in the 
keen and pleasant humor they recognized the voice from below tie robes 
of crimson and ermine to be that of Miss Fenner. Candies and nuts 
were handed to all present, and Santa herself carried some to each of 
the servants assembled in one corner of the hall, and with the true old 
Southern spirit made some little remark that filled their hearts with 
enthusiastic happiness. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 13 



Two little girls whose hearts were full of the reality of Santa Glaus, 
Katherine Crews and Katherine Hughes, gave recitations that were re- 
ceived with storms of applause. 

The little children sang, "O Little Town of Bethlehem," then all 
joined in the chorus, "It came upon the midnight clear," and with hearts 
filled with the joy of the crowning festival of the year, the guests said 



good-nicht. 



School Notes. 



-.Many of the girls spent the holidays with school friends. Among 
these there were Xellie Fort, who went home with Frankie Self to 
Hickory; Margaret Temple with the "Baltimore girls," Mary Gwynn 
with Irving Morgan in Charleston, and Tela Jemison with Alice Hines 
in Kmston. Miss Hull went home with Miss Pixlev to Winfall, S. C, 
and Miss Cribbs spent the holidays with Miss Fenner in Baltimore' 
Mrs. Irvine was in Xew York, Miss Smith at her home in West Vir- 
ginia, Miss Spurlock with friends in Wadesboro, X. C. Mr. and Mrs. 
Vincent, Miss Lee, and Miss Spann spent the holidays at school. 

—Of the girls Mary Alexander, Mary Vann, and Jane Stillman 
stayed 111 Raleigh for Christmas; Jane with Mrs. Hawkins, Mary Alex- 
ander at school, and Mary Vann part of the time at school, and part 
with her cousin, Dr. Vann, of the Baptist University. 

—Isabel Heyward spent the holidays with an aunt in Washington, 
I). C, Marie Hardin with her aunt in Fayetteville, and Bessie Watters 
frith an aunt in Wilmington. Bessie stopped in Favetteville on her 
way back for a short visit to Jessie Croswell, of St. Mary's last year. 

—Mr. DnBose spent the holidays in Florida with old Asheville 
friends, the Pattons. 

— jSFell Atkinson spent one week of the holidays with Marie Koiner 
I Charlotte; Sidney Gabbett and Allene Gentry were for a few days 
with Louise Wright in Raleigh, and Minnie Davis spent part of her 
time m Raleigh with her cousin Dee Duncan. 

—Ret Ruff and Annie Sloan, '06, spent the holidays with Beatrice 
Cohen, '07. 



14 The St. Maet's Muse. 



Eva and Ida Rogerson and Annie Wood stopped over night with 

Mabel Willis in Washington, N. C., on their way home, and Susan By- 
num in Charlotte with Sadie Thomas. 

"We are glad to welcome two new girls, Isabel Brogden and Josie 

Prather. Others are expected at the close of the term, 

We are glad to have Grace Ward and Ellen Duvall, who went 

home because of illness, well and back with us again. 



Christmas at the Confederate Soidiers' Home in Raleigh 



The ffirls of St. Etheldrecla's and of St. Elizabeth's Chapters of the 
Auxiliary asked this year the privilege of making a contribution to the 
Christmas dinner at the Old Soldiers' Home on Few Bern Avenue, and 
Miss Spann and Mrs. Vincent, during the holiday which they spent at 
St. Mary's, took pleasure in carrying out the girls' wishes. 

Miss Spann tells her impressions of the day and the Home in the 
Evening Times of December 27th, as follows : 

A most delightful and unique experience was the Christmas day spent at the old 
soldiers' home. Some of the girls at St. Mary's had contributed to the dinner and 
had conferred upon the writer the honor of carrying out this ministry of love. 

An abundance of good food had been prepared, and few homes could have been 
furnished with a more comfortable meal. 

As they arose from the table the old men, with sweet courtesy, came forward to 
say some words of welcome to their guest, and to send messages of thanks to the 
<nrls at St. Mary's. As the little procession came forward it was almost too sad to 
witness unmoved. Some were feeble from years, some partially paralyzed, others 
with only one leg, came forward with extended hand— sometimes the right hand, 
sometimes the left, because there was no right. 

One dear old man said: "Lady, you came to our Christmas dinner; come another 
time and see how we live, for we have a good dinner every day." They were so full 
of appreciation that as they passed the writer had never had her heart so filled with 
benedictions, nor a Christmas day so rich and full. 

God bless the girls of St. Mary's, and may they go forward into sweet Christlike 
womanhood, with a thoughtful love that will illuminate the dark places of life. 

Captain and Mrs. Brooks are father and mother to these old soldiers of our South- 
land, and it is sweet to see the trusting childlike love with which they turn to them 
in all their trials. 

The hospital department touches one most deeply. A few men are helplessly 
confined to their cots, some are in rolling chairs, and a few sit patiently in the 
darkness, for they will never see light until "angels have lifted the veil." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



The material wants of our old soldiers are nobly provided for, and Captain and 
Mrs. Brooks give a heart service no money could buy. Two needs, however, appealed 
to me. One is the need of a new range in the kitchen, another that of daily papers, 
magazines and books. Some of the soldiers are able to render some little service^ 
and for this they are paid, and are thus able to have a little pocket-money. 

We are standing now on the eve of the centennial birthday of the man whose name 
we speak reverently and with bowed head, our beloved Lee, and as we care for these, 
the men that he loved, may we not hear him say in the words of the Perfect One, 
"Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these, ye have done it unto me." 

The appreciation of the courtesy is shown in this letter : 

N. C. Soldiers' Home, January 1, 1907. 
To the Ladies of St. Mary's: 

We have learned that the abundance of nice turkey which we enjoyed so much at 
our Christmas dinner was your noble and generous gift, and words are inadequate 
to convey our thanks for the delightful surprise. You have endeared yourselves to 
our hearts, and you will ever be remembered by us with gratitude. 

Besides wishing for each of you a happy New Year, we hope you will attain all 
those accomplishments for which you are so earnestly striving and which your good- 
ness deserves. May your college days continue to be pleasant, and when you bid your 
Alma Mater farewell and return to your homes, may it be to spend a long and happy 
hfe - The Old Comrades. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ebnest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnee Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 

VrrK-PRKSTDFNTs i Mris - l M ' Pitten g er > Raleigh, 
vice-presidents, < Mrs F p Tucker Raleigh, 

[Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 

Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, !St. Mary's. 

The Saunders Memorial Window. 



When the plan was first definitely announced to the friends of Miss 
Saunders in September last, the Feast of Epiphany was set as the season 
for the dedication of the Memorial Window, and no reservation was 
made for the possible contingency of the necessary funds not being 
forthcoming. The order for the window was promptly placed with 
Misses Wickham and Stone, after the design had been approved by Mrs. 
Saunders, and Misses McKimmon and Shipp, the special committee, and 
the artists came up to the highest expectations. It is very gratifying, 
therefore, to be able to state that on Epiphany, the very day of the dedi- 
cation, the last few dollars necessary for the completion of the fund were 
forthcoming, and without any special solicitatiou, and the voluntary 
contributions to the fund amounted almost exactly to the amount re- 
quired. The Muse would at this time again express its thanks to each 
of the contributors, for while desire to do in a matter of this kind is 
rarely lacking and the joy of the giving is the chief reward of the giver, 
still too often a worthy plan fails not from lack of interest but from 
inaction. 

The Memorial Window has its place now in the Chapel, which it will 
have its share in beautifying, and it will bring the lesson of Miss 
Saunders' life to the hearts of many who never had the privilege of 
knowing her. The fund was made u,p by the gifts of almost a hundred 
friends, in and out of the school, in sums ranging from twenty-five cents 
up to ten dollars. The window is therefore what it was meant to be — ! 
the general expression of love and esteem. 

An account of the dedication of the window is printed elsewhere m • 
this number of the Muse. 



The St. Maby's Muse. 17 



ALUMNAE NEWS. 

There is more than a passing interest for St. Mary's girls of the 
early days in the announcement of the marriage at the Church of the 
Ascension, Baltimore, on January 16th, of Miss Tempe Austin Hamil- 
ton, daughter of Mrs. Matthew Allen Hamilton, and Reverend Chaun- 
cey Hayden Blodgett. The mother of the bride, known to her girlhood 
friends as Sallie Austin, spent her school days at St. Mary's, and is yet 
remembered with love by her old school-mates. 



The death of Mr. George P. Burgwyn, who passed away at his home 
in Jackson on the morning of January -5th, removes a faithful worker 
for the Church in the Carolinas and a loyal friend of St. Mary's. Mr. 
Burgwyn's daughter, Miss Minnie, graduated with the St. Mary's Class 
of 1904, and has since been living at home with her father; and he was 
the guardian and friend of the Misses Bowen throughout their school 
days here. 

The death of Mrs. Lizzie Lee Belvin after a very brief illness at her 
home on Hillsboro road, Raleigh, on the second of January, came as 
a great shock to her many friends. Mrs. Belvin, wife of Mr. Chas. H. 
Belvin, President of the Raleigh Banking and Trust Company, and 
daughter of Mr. Jas. D. Pullen, was not herself educated at St. Mary's, 
but her daughter, Miss Nannie, was in school here many years, grad- 
uating in 1900, and afterwards teaching in the English Department for 
(several years. Her mother's death at this time recalls keenly Miss Bel- 
mi's death only a little over two years ago. The Muse extends for St. 
pfary's deep sympathy to Mr. Belvin and his surviving children. 

The death of Miss Isabel Gary, daughter of Major W. E. Gary, of 
lenderson, on January 9th, came as a great shock to her friends who 
iad not known of her illness. Miss Gary was highly esteemed at St. 
Gary's, where she spent the sessions of 1901-1903, and was a "Certifi- 
cate Girl" in 1903. Girls of the last three years know of her also 
hrough her sister, Kate, who finished her course here at the last session. 
£iss Isabel Gary was but twenty-two years of age. 



18 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Tke resignation of Dr. M. M. Marshall from the Rectorship of Christ 
Church, Raleigh, where he has ministered so faithfully for the last 
thirty-three years, is an event of interest throughout the State. We 
read in the News and Observer: 

For fifty-three years Dr. Marshall has been in the Episcopal ministry, and. thirty- 
three of these years have been spent in Raleigh as Rector of Christ Church. He is 
greatly esteemed and loved in Raleigh, not alone by the members of his own parish, 
but by all the citizens. His life has been a benediction to all who have come in touch 
with him, his ministration being filled with so much love and gentleness that all in 
this city hope that he can be induced to continue his work. 

It is understood that Dr. Marshall's only reason for desiring to retire is that with 
increasing years and the multiplying of the duties of a parish that continues to grow, 
he finds that his strength is being overtaxed, and that because of this he feels that 
a younger man should take up his work. This resignation of Dr. Marshall's, if 
accepted, will not cause him to remove from Raleigh, for he will continue to make 
this his home. 



THE WEDDINGS Of THE MONTH- 



Moo re - B r e v a rd . 

Mrs. Robert Joseph Brevard 

announces the marriage of her daughter 

Caro Mays 

to 

Dr. Baxter Springs Moore, 

on Wednesday the twenty-sixth of December, 

nineteen hundred and six, 

Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Bowers-Tayloe. 

Mr. Charles Warburton Tayloe 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of his daughter, 

Lucy Alston, 

to 

Mr. Benjamin Franklin Bowers, 

on the afternoon of Thursday the twenty- seventh of December, 

one thousand nine hundred and six, 

at half after two o'clock, 

Saint Peter's Episcopal Church, 

Washington, North Carolina. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



St. Amant-Andrews. 
Christinas afternoon at 3 o'clock, at the home of the bride's father, Mr. Phil. H. 
Andrews, Miss Lucy Andrews and Mr. A. D. St. Amant, of Brooklyn, N. Y., were 
quietly married. This marriage is not only a surprise to Miss Andrews' friends, but 
also to her family, as plans were being made for her marriage in April to Mr. St. 
Amant. 

The ceremony was performed by Dr. I. McK. Pittenger, Rector of the Church of the 
Good Shepherd. 

The bride and groom left on the four o'clock Seaboard for Southern Pines, and 
returned last night on their way to the North. 

Mr. St. Amant was formerly a resident of New Orleans, but now makes his home in 
New York. Several years since he attended the A. and M. College and has a number 
of friends in this city. 

Keller-Love. 

A pretty home wedding was solemnized last night at 9 o'clock at the home of Mrs. 
E. H. Love, when her daughter, Miss Alice Love, and Mr. H. P. S. Keller, plighted 
their troth, the ceremony having been performed by Rev. J. C. Massee, pastor of the 
Tabernacle Baptist Church. 

The home was decorated for the occasion with palms, ferns and potted plants. It 
was a very quiet wedding, and only a few intimate friends of the contracting parties 
were in attendance. Mr. and Mrs. Keller will make their home in this city and will 
be at home to their friends at 511 Oakwood Avenue. Both are well known here, 
where they have a large number of friends. 



hjiU's Tribute to Lee. 



He was a foe without hate; a friend without treachery; a soldier 
without cruelty ; a victor without oppression, and a victim without mur- 
muring. 

He was a public officer without vices ; a private citizen without wrong ; 
a neighbor without reproach ; a Christian without hypocrisy, and a man 
without guile. 

He was a Caesar without his ambition ; Frederick without his tyranny ; 
Napoleon without his selfishness, and Washington without his reward. 

He was obedient to authority as a servant, and royal in authority as 
a true king. 

He was gentle as a woman in life ; modest and pure as a virgin in 
thought; watchful as a Eoman vestal in duty; submissive to law as 
Socrates, and grand in battle as Achilles. — Benj. H. Hill 



READ !— MARK !-ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



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REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



St. Mary's Seal Pins. 

St. Mary's Souvenir Postals, 

St. Mary's 1907 Calendars, 

St. Mary's Pennants, 

Can be procured by writing to The Muse. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 

Dry Goods 

OP ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES PINE SHOES &© SLIPPERS 



• Send to. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 

OF ALL KINDS 

SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplier. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves. Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



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KING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store." 



GROCERS 

216 FATETTEVILLE STREET 

KING-CROWEIylv'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



Y Y Y Man. 

There is a farmer who is Y Y 

Enough to take his E E, 
And study nature with his I I, 

And think of what he C C, 
He hears the chatter of the J J 

As they each other T T, 
And sees that when a tree D K K 

It makes a home for B B. 
A yoke of oxen he will U U 

With many haws and GG, 
And their mistakes he will X Q Q 

When plowing for his P P. 
He little buys, but much he sells, 

And therefore little O 0; 
And when he hoes his soil by spells 

He also soils his hoes. 
— Sam Lloyd, in Woman's Home Companion for December. 



THE BOYLAN-PEAR 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 

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Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
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Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

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Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



John Quincy, tho' kindly and gentle, declared 
''The man must be master, by gum!" 

But his outlook on life is just what his dear wife 
Let's him peer at from under her thumb. 



The rector got married to Annabel Gauze; 

The rector was gentle and good ; 
He made up his mind that he'd marry because 

She had made up her mind that he should. 

Both poor as Job's turkey and not over strong — 

Hold a three-dollar job the man couldn't — 
We are forced to conclude that they married because 

There was every good reason they shouldn't. 

— From "Why They Married. 



A. . DUGHI, 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folks know and approve of Dughi 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Prrate Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 2i6 Fayetteville St. 



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Raleigh, N. C. 

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Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



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ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
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Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



' Omnes agunt, sed pater, 
Toto die sedit, 
Pedes ante ignem, 
Tubam terrae fumet ; 
Mater lavendos prudet, 
Ann soror atq ue 
In nostre omnes agunt, 
Sed senex-ne! " 

" O condamnati. " — Life. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



BARRETT & THOMPSON-ARCHITECTS 
Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 
Author of 
"Colonial Southern Homes." 
115% Fayettev ille St. Raleigh, N. C. 

PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE~CO~ 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



GRIMES & VASS, 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleigh, N. C 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANTC 

wft]?™ 1 8 i 5 ' 000 Surplus 825,000. Deposits over 
8b00,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

TO^WWSSSSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered bv a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. * 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
tneir studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. TJZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

m,-,^, „,„,-,„ Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 



POWELL, & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, ST. C. 

Capital, 8225,000. Surplus and Profits, 8115,000. 

Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 



If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



W. B. MANN, 

11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 

"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 



PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 



HUBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



% 100,000.00 

100,000.00 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, !906-'07. 



JANUARY-FEBRUARY. 



January 12, Saturday-8 p. m.-St. Margaret's Chapter in " A Night in Bohemia. 
January 18-23 — Examination Week. 

January 19, Saturday-Lee's Birthda, -half holiday. Special Exercises at 2 o'clock- 
January 24, Thursday— Easter Term begins. 
January 26, Saturday— Muse Club. 
February 2, Saturday — 

February 9, Saturday— 8 p. m.— Muse Club.— "Valentine Party." 
February 13, Wednesday-Ash Wednesday-Holy day-Lent begins. 



SEABOARD 

^VIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

DirgrtLine to AH Points in the South, South-West, Notjh^ndJ^u^Wp^ 

UBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta' 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

KB2S\S£lffl? lavSan*^ and Atlanta 

(ea^Xl^ 

C H. HATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD F COST 

* i Pa t S Tn AgCnt ' GeEeral PaS8eDger Agent ' *«»* Vice-President 

Raleigh, M. C. Portsmoath, Va. Portsmouth, Va 



The Student Directory, 1906-'07. 



The St. Mary's Muse Staff. 



MONTHLY. 



(Under direction of Senioi Class.) 

Lillian Farmer, Editor.in-Chief. 
Emily Garrison, Business Manager. 
Louise Hill, "1 

Mary Spruill, Literary Editors. 

Helen Ball, ( J 

Beatrice Cohen, J 

Sue Prince, 1 

Heber Birdsong, v Art Editors. 

Alice McCullers, \ 



(Under direction of Muse Club.) 



Serena Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 
Beatrice Cohen, Act. Bus. Mgr. 
Elizabeth Waddill. 
Helen Liddell. 
Helen Strange. 

Lillian Farmer. 
Emily Carrison. 
Mary Spruill. 
Sue Prince. 
Margaret DuBose 



Managing 
Board 



Alice McCullers. 
Georgia Hales. 
Louise Hill. 
Mary Vann. 
Eloise Robinson. 



The Literary Societies. 



SIGMA LAMBDA. 



EPSILON ALPHA PI. 

Lillian Farmer President Sue Prince. 

E D zabeth W addill Vice-President Sarah Jon es. 

Grace Ward ■_ Secretary Emily Carrison. 

Eva Eogerson Treasurer Helen Liddell. 

Sallie H. Battle Corresponding Secretary Serena Bailey. 

Louise Hill __ — Critic Helen Strange. 

Frankie Self Historian Alice Corbett. 

Annie Wells ) m „ i Katherine Henderson 

Ka^BlIcknall } Tel,erS { Eloise Robinson. 



The Auxi 
General Directress 



iary Chapters. 
Miss McKimmon. 



ST. CATHERINE'S. 

Miss Thomas, Directress. 
Louise Hill. Presidsnt. 
Jessie Harris, Treasurer. 
Emily Carrison, Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S. 

Miss Cribbs, Directress. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, President. 
Mabel Willis, Vice-President. 
Matilda Haughton, Treasurer. 
Bettie Sturgeon, Secretary. 

ST. MONICA'S. 

Miss McKimmon, Directress. 
Elizabeth Waddill, President. 
Janie DuBose, Vice-President. 
Lyman Grimsley, Treasurer. 
Chevilette Kinloch, Secretary. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S. 

Mrs. Vincent, Directress. 

Susan Bynum, President. 

Alice Munnerlyn, Secretary-Treasurer. 



ST. ANNE'S. 

Miss Sutton, Directress 
Eva Rogerson, President 
Blanche Robinson, Vice-President. 
Mary Vann, Treasurer. 
Minnie Leary, Secretary. 

ST. ETHELDREDA'S 

Miss Spann, Directress. 

Sarah Jones, President. 

Katharine Henderson, Vice-President. 

Alice Corbett, Treasurer. 

Marguerite Short. Secretary. 






I ' Climate Health/ and SaM 

Mary's School, 

( f° r 9' lT ^ «nd. young ivornen). 



UAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1906. 









■ >i£# COLLEGE. 



I^^^HHiBllBHH|HnBH^H| 

?nty -five' Members in the Faculty. 




ittentioti to 
istie training. 

ilogue and other 



Equipment New. Twenty-eight 

rand Pianos, p | ||1 \ -^ 'yv "■ §jj ||| 

ie of Education ivithout slight 






WANTED-A J«n+, 



^MUDuBOSE. 



ti>£&ttttne dumber 





XLhc 
y's Abuse 



iwtew 



iff 






The St. Mary's Muse. 



VALENTINE NUMBER. 



Vol. XL February, 1907. 



No. 7. 



Her Fan. 



SERENA COBIA BAILEY. 

Among the treasures in my desk, 
There is a bit of broken fan, 

Of filmy lace and painted gauze 
And ivory sticks from far Japan. 

My love enfolds you, little fan, 
For once my lady toyed with you: 

Yes, that's the secret of my love, 
And why I kiss you as I do. 

Oh, painted Cupid on the fan, 

I wonder if you know, my boy, 
How like this fan is to my heart — 
Another broken, cast-off toy! 



Wanted — A Heart. 



MARGARET ROSALIE DUBOSE. 



And it is all the fault of that old valentine ! Why does every one 
y, "Why, what's de matter wif de itsa-bitsa baby?" and chuck me 
under the chin in a manner calculated to drive any one to an asylum ! 
One week ago I was well and happy and had more teeth than any baby 
on the street, nurse said. Now I am a mere wreck of shattered nerves. 
No longer does it delight me to swallow pins, or pull kitty's tail. Even 
the excitement of yelling myself blue in the face and scaring the family 
into fits, has palled upon me (and if you want real live excitement just 
try that little plan. It gives more genuine pleasure than a theatre 
party, besides being much cheaper). I have had many advantages for 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



a youth of fifteen months, being born a Bostonian, and having a nurse 
whose taste for exciting literature is only equaled by her love for police- 
men. And that brings me to the beginning of my story. 

It was St, Valentine's day! I heard Bill, the policeman, say so, 
when he asked nurse if she didn't think the postman must have a letter 
for her. There was a letter, and when she laid it down on the bench 
I began to examine it. Of course I put it in my mouth first. Why 
stupid grow-ups should see with their eyes only, I can't imagine. I 
suppose one loses the art of logic in later life. If you were asked to 
describe a penny, I suppose you would say it was of metal, round, and 
flat, Now / could add that it is cold at first, doesn't taste very good, 
and is hard to swallow. 

To return to the letter. It had "Valentine" in large blue letters 

across the top, then a red thing, labeled, "My heart, — Bill," and this 

verse — 

"I send you my heart, 
So we never can part." 

I may add it did not taste very good, and I'm afraid I swallowed 
some of the corner in reading it. At any rate it gave my fertile brain 
an idea. There is such an attractive little girl across the street from 
us. She has the best voice in the neighborhood and is also the cham- 
pion wriggler (two charming traits which, combined, are simply irre- 
sistible). Think of the yelling contests and crawling races we could 
have together. I simply could not live without her ! The matter was 
clear. I should send her my heart and we never would part (as the 
valentine said). 

Strange I didn't remember seeing my heart. I looked on the bench 
and go-cart for it, but without any success. Just then nurse came back. 
"Why, Ink at me chile agoin' to commit suicide of himself, and if he 
hasn't been destroyin' of me valentine. The heartless creature he is !" 

Heartless! That word made me hold my breath. Did nurse mean 
that I had no heart? Frantically I counted all my fingers! They 
were there! I had two eyes, as usual; nose and ears in their proper 
places. Then an awful thought assailed me. I snatched off both pink 
socks and tried to see if I had toes enough to match my fingers. Now, 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



I am something of a mathematician (as all Boston babies are) ; but I 
was so excited that I seemed to have twice as many fingers as toes on 
one side, and vice versa on the other. (I chewed up a Dictionary for 
half an hour one day— hence that vice versa.) At last I became more 
calm, and found that my toes and fingers all matched. They were 
there, but no heart ! It couldn't have been fastened on as securely as 
my ears, for instance, because I'm sure I would know if I dropt one of 
them. Besides, it must have been very small, because the policeman's 
was only the size of a. quarter, and it must have been a grown-up one. 
Evidently my heart had been very small, insecurely fastened on and in 
the careless way nurse handles me it must have fallen off. (Hereafter 
I shall always count my fingers before and after a roll in the park.) 

I searched everywhere for my lost heart, crawled into every nook 
and cranny, but in vain. I was exploring under the kitchen table when 
I heard nurse reading aloud to the cook. " 'Oh', she cried, pressing 
her white, slender hand to her snowy forehead, 'and you are the man 
who had stolen my heart' !" I almost swallowed both thumbs in my 
excitement! So that was what had happened to my heart. It had 
been stolen when I was asleep perhaps, or out with nurse. Dark 
thoughts filled my brain! I longed for revenge! 

Nurse wouldn't have wanted my precious heart, because she already 
had Bill's. The guilt, then, rested on the cook or my parents. They 
seem kind enough, but if they have stolen my heart, who can tell but 
some fair morning I may wake up without my fingers, or even my 
mouth ? It is a fearful thought ! The dread that I live in will prob- 
ably cause my hair to turn gray— when it begins to grow— and I will 
never be able to paste my heart on a valentine for the little girl across 
the way. 

A Valentine. 



HELEN KATHARINE LIDDELL. 

A necklace, lady mine, I give to you, 
'Tis filled with many a gem of rarest hue ; 
But ere about your gentle throat it clings, 
I'll tell you of the message that it brings. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



A sapphire of the richest royal blue, 
Is here to tell you that my love is true, 
And deep as ever cave of ocean knew — 
This is the sapphire's message, dear, to you. 

This beaming, blushing, bleeding ruby red, — 
A drop of our dear Master's blood, 'tis said, — 
Is all my heart, which still to your's is wed, 
Tho' life and love, through all the world be dead. 

The color of the coolest, deepest sea, 
This emerald, tells how steadfast love can be, 
And constant, never changing, yet so free, — 
Such love as this, dear, is for you and me. 

And here an opal filled with flashing fire, 

Brings with it all love's passion, Heart's Desire, 

To say that truest love can never tire, 

Tho' heaven and earth should perish, Heart's Desire. 

The noblest of them all, this diamond bright, 

MoTe radiant than the rest, with heaven's own light,- 

So, dearest one, are you within my sight, 

A light to lead me through the darkest night. 

So take this necklace, which I bring to you, 
Filled with the sparkling gems of many a hue, 
And as around your gentle throat it clings, 
Remember, dear, each message that it brings. 



St. Augustine. 



FLORENCE M. BECKWITH. 



St. Augustine, the oldest city of the United States, is perhaps also one 
of the most interesting to lovers of the quaint and beautiful. The first 
thing one thinks of in connection with St. Augustine is the old city 
gate. This and Fort Marion are the only relics of the elaborate system 
of fortifications which once defended the city. Of the wall, which for- 
merly extended from the Fort to the San Sebastian river, there is now 
only thirty feet left on each side of the gate. 

A great point of interest is the old Spanish Fort Marion, finished in 
1756. This is surrounded by a moat forty feet in width, in which at 
high tide, water may even now be seen. Above the portcullis is carved 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



the Arms of Spain. On the inside, around an open court, are casemates 
or rooms which, in the old days, were used as barracks, mess-rooms and 
store-rooms. The dungeon was used then as a powder magazine. After 
the United States came into possession of the fort, part of the dungeon 
■ wall caved in and the closed entrance to another vault was noticed and 
opened. In this it is said there were found two skeletons, iron cages, 
and instruments of torture. 

The streets of the town are very narrow, especially Treasury street, 
across which people may shake hands. The Plaza is a park of shade 
trees and fountains ; in the center of it is an open stone structure called 
the "slave market" ; it, however, was never used for anything except for 
provisions. 

Facing the Plaza is St. Joseph's Cathedral, It was completed in 
1791 ; burned, and rebuilt in 1888. 

These are the most interesting features of the old St. Augustine. 
The new part of the city, with its parks and its beautiful buildings, is 
like fairy-land itself. 

Five miles from St. Augustine there is the so-called Fountain of 
Perpetual Youth. Whatever miraculous powers it may or may not 
have, it is endeared to the visitor by seeming to be a link with the old 
days, and with the romantic and picturesque character of Ponce de Leon. 



My Apple Tree. 



MARY C. SHUFORD. 



When I was a little girl my favorite play-house was a big old apple- 
tree, growing beside the porch. To "grown-eyes" this tree always re- 
mained an ordinary, simple apple-tree, but to me it was sometimes a great 
ship, with the wind swaying the huge masts ; sometimes an enchanted 
castle, from which there was no escaping; but more often it turned into 
the nicest play-house imaginable, with a spacious room on each big 
bough, and a tower 'way, 'way up in the tip-top branches. 

It was a dangerous way that led up to my "truly own" room, far up 
under the tower. I would take the "Heavenly Twins," Sarah Crewe 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



and Alice — I remember Sarah had been scalped in an Indian massacre, 
and Alice had lost a leg and an eye, so they were my favorites— under 
one arm, and would climb up the broad staircase, — which to other people 
was the trunk of the tree with the smaller branches making steps — up, 
up, up. Soon the trunk divided into two great branches, one bending 
east, the other west. There was the "scarey" part, for you had to 
crawl up on this western branch a little way before you could catch 
the upper boughs and draw yourself safely on. It was such a short way 
to crawl, but it took a great deal of courage, for I was a very little girl, 
and it looked a very far distance to the green grass below. So I would 
always shut my eyes, hold my breath, and crawl slowly over, hugging 
the tree and the "twins" with might and main. 

When I got safely past the bare limb and among the leafy branches, 
I climbed on a little way, until I reached the nicest, coziest, little seat 
among the boughs, just big enough for a little girl to lean back com- 
fortably and feel secure, held close by the loving branches. This was 
my favorite "room," and, shaded from the glare of the sunshine by 
the hundreds of green leaves, I spent many a happy hour there, munch- 
ing green- apples, and reading to my dolls, the "Blue Fairy Book" or 
Alice's own wonderful adventures. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Georgia Stanton Hales, '09, Editor. 



" A Night in Bohemia." 

On Saturday evening, January 12th, St, Margaret's Chapter gave 
its annual entertainment, this year— "A Night in Bohemia." The 
stage was prettily decorated in Japanese fashion. For the first song, 
"Pinky Panky Poo," the girls were appropriately dressed in Japanese 
kimonas; for the second "Owatonna," the little singers wore Indian cos- 
tume; in the third, "When the Circus Comes to Town," the girls mad 
very good "country lassies" ; and in the fourth, "My Cocoanut Lou," 
the singers were gorgeous in red. In the next numbers — "Its a Lovely 
Dav for a Walk," and "I'll be Your Rainbow," the little children de* 



The St. Mary's Muse. 7 

lighted every one. But it was the last selection, "He Walks Eight in 
and He Turns Around and He Walks Eight Out Again," that was 
enjoyed most. 

The readings by Emily Garrison, Eainsford DuBose and little Kath- 
arine Hughes were especially good. Mabel Willis was the accompanist 
and all of the singing and the playing was fine. Both Miss Cribbs and 
her Chapter deserve much credit for their success. 

This was the program: 

Music. 

"Pinky Panky Poo." 

1 Misses Haughton and Sturgeon, Brogden and Frazer, Hoke and Weaver, 

Hardin and Mardre, Hazard and Heyward, Wells and Powell. 

Readin g E. Carrison. 

"Owatonna." 
j Misses E, DuBose, Cameron, Stone, Edith Mann, Strong, Edna Mann, 

Jones, M. Mann. 

"When the Circus Comes to Town." 

Misses Bonner, Tankard, Weaver, Bayner, Leland, and Quinerly. 

My Cocoanut Lou." 

i Misses S. Battle and Sturgeon, Frazer and Hardin, Hazard and Mardre, 

Wells and Powell, Hoke and Fewbold, Gilmer and Heyward. 

fading E. DuBose. 

"Its a Lovely Day for a Walk." 
Misses Giersch and Hughes, Williford and E. Hughes. 

Eeadin §' K. Hughes. 

"I'll be Your Eainbeau." 

Misses Giersch and E. Hughes, Williford and K. Hughes. 

"He Walks Eight in and He Turns Around and He Walks Eight 

Out Again." 
Misses Bonner, Tankard, Brogden, Sturgeon, Quinerly and Hoke. 

"Medley." 
^ The words of the special song adapted for the occasion from a popular 
air were as follows : 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



When first I left my dear old home 

To come up to this school, 
I reconciled myself to fate, 

Until I met Miss Pool. 
But when she told me that my crimes 

Would be written in a book, 
I thought how good I'd have to be, 

And then my knees — they shook. 

I walked right in and turned around 

And walked right out again; 
I made that round trip in less time 

Than it takes to count up ten. 
I didn't ask no questions why, 
I didn't stop to say good-bye — 
I walked right in and turned around 
And walked right out again. 

I live in a dormitory, 

So you see I have a time 
A tryin for to skip my tasks 

And meals 'most all the time; 
I go up stairs resolved to spend 

A quiet hour or more, 
When from the teacher's alcove comes, 

"Go right down off this floor." 

I walk right in and turn around 
And walk right out again, etc. 

'Most every boy in Raleigh 

Likes to come up here to call, 
And oftentimes you find a chap 

A-standin' in the hall. 
But when Miss 'Liza walks right up 

And says, "Your permit, please," 
He cringes at that awful look 

And sinks down on his knees. 

He walks right in and turns around 

And walks right out again, etc. 
He doesn't ask no questions why, 
He doesn't stop to say good-bye — 
He walks right in and turns around 
And walks right out again. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 



Lee's Birthday Exercises. 

The Lee Memorial Exercises at St, Mary's, though slightly more ex- 
tended than usual on account of this being the centenary as well as 
anniversary, were simple and intended merely to give expression to the 
love that all of us feel for the great leader. 

The school gathered in the parlor at half-past two in the afternoon, 
and the program, under the auspices of the Joint Literary Societies, was 
given as follows: 

Opening Chorus — '-Dixie." 

Essay— "Robert E. Lee" Lillian Farmer. 

Reading— "The Sword of Lee" Paula Hazard. 

Reading— "Incidents of the Surrender" Rosa Heath. 

Reading— "Robert E. Lee" Matilda Haughton. 

Closing Chorus— "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground." 

Sue Prince, President of Sigma Lambda, presided, and seated with 
her were Elizabeth Waddill, Vice-President, and May Hoke, President, 
representing their respective societies, Epsilon Alpha Pi and Alpha Eho. 

The Japanese Tea. 

The Muse Club entertained delightfully at a Japanese Tea Satur- 
day night, January 26th. The parlor had been beautifully and artis- 
tically decorated for the occasion. The Tea Booth, with its Japanese 
hangings, was popular. Misses Garrison and Watters served here in 
the proper costumes of the East. Candy was sold by a Jap (called Miss 
Liddell in America), beneath most attractive hangings. Miss Mar- 
guerite Thompson, (who served ice-cream) in her handsome kimona, 
was especially charming. Every one had a good time, and I feel sure 
that the whole school wishes to thank Miss E. Garrison, who had the 
entertainment in charge, for the pleasant evening she afforded them. 

The Junior Reception. 
I The Reception of the "Naughty Eight" girls, to the girls of 
"Naughty Seven" was heralded by unique cards tied with yellow and 
white ribbon, inviting the Seniors and Certificate pupils to a "Bird 
Carnival" on Saturday evening, February 2, 1907. 

Mr. Stone, Miss Lee and Miss Pool were the guests of honor. 



10 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Our expectations were more than fulfilled when we entered the French 
Room, which had been transformed into a bower of beauty by its decora- 
tions of evergreens and quantities of yellow roses. In and among the 
vines were pinned slips of paper, each bearing a rhyme, such as 

" Red breasted harbinger of spring, 
We wait in hope to hear thee sing." 

The meaning of these mysterious slips was soon explained, when 
each guest was provided with a dainty card with yellow pencil attached, 
on which to write her answers to the rhymes. The first prize, a Japa- 
nese print, was awarded to Sue Prince, and the second, a china spar- 
row, fell to Alice McCullers. 

Next an enormous "bird pie" was placed on a stand in the center of 
the room, and much laughter ensued when attractive and original favors 
in the shape of bird, rabbit, etc., were drawn from the pie by means of 
ribbons. The amusing feature of these favors was that they could be 
made to "squeak" in a ridiculous manner. 

Refreshments, consisting of delicious ice-cream, meringues, salted al- 
monds and mints, were then served, and after a few minutes spent in 
chatting we reluctantly bade our hostesses good-night. The reception 
was voted by all one of the most original as well as enjoyable events of 
the year. u * X1 * 

In Lighter Vein. 



j£ C. — a Oh! I wonder if we are going to have "Richard III on 

Exam. ?" 

I, x. — "Was he the man who killed Julius Csesar ?" 

B. W. — "Did you say she spent Christmas in Washington ?" 

M. H. — "No, she was in New Orleans." 

B. W. — "Well, she told me she was going to be somewhere in 
Louisiana." 

Miss Katie — "Hurry up, Wilhelmina, you have only fifteen minutes 
before dinner." 

W. H. — "Well, Miss Katie, I haven't anything to do but to dress." 



The St. Mart's Muse. H 



M. S.— (In a paper on the Seven Years' War) "and it lasted nine 
years." 

A. C. (Studying Harmony)— "I just can't understand these octaves 
i and fifths," 

H. S. — "Are you studying Algebra, Alice?" 

First girl — "You know he has a clerical position with the electrical 
company." 

Second girl— "I don't see what a minister has to do with an electrical 
company." 

What was the matter with the Senior German Exam. ? Stone-bruised. 

Sarah Jones — Why doesn't John play foot-ball any more? 

M. Short— Why, when he was half-back on the Virginia team he 
got his collar-bone kicked by a Cherokee Indian. (If the poor Car- 
lisles have to be Cherokees we don't see why she didn't let them have 
tomahawks. ) 

The Muse's Jokes. 

I have been told by many friends — 

I think 'twas kindly meant — 
That all of them enjoy the Muse 

Whenever it is sent. 

They like the editorials 

And stories and all such; 
But when they come to "Lighter Vein," 

It really is too much. 

It wrinkles up their brows and puts 

Their brains all out of joint, 
To find in any of our jokes 

The vestige of a point. 

I don't deny the truth of this, 

The points are hard to find, 
And not to try to find them, is 

The best thing for one's mind. 



12 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



That we would like to have good jokes 

Is surely very true, 
But if girls 'won't say funny things, 

What can a person do? 

We ask the girls to tell us all 
The funny things they've heard; 

They say they know lots, but they've vowed 
They wouldn't tell a word. 

It makes it rather hard, you see, 

On those who're after wit, 
To know it's hidden all around, 

But they can't get a bit. 

So now, our readers, we will hope, 

Can see just how things lie, 
And when our jokes aren't very good, 

They'll know the reason why. 



Jack's Eyes. 



To me brown eyes are dearest 
Because of Jack's dark eyes, 

And of the lurking tenderness 
That deep within them lies. 

I'm sure now that Jack loves me, 
Though he's never told me so; 

Words need not tell of secrets 

That the glance of love can show. 

Dear eyes ! your sadness haunts me, 
Now that I'm far from you; 

Yet should chance fore'er divide us, 
I'd still know that Jack was true. 



Sue Brent Prince. 



Oh! Jack, when we shall meet, dear, 

I'll tell you — if I can — 
How I love you. (Reader, listen, 

Jack's a dog and not a man). 



Serena C. Bailey. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to > 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleiGh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Serena C. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 

Georgia S. Hales, Elizabeth Waddill. Helen Strange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Sallie Haywood Battle. 

Beatrice B. Cohen and Jessie Page Harris, Business Managers. 



EDITORIAL. 
Examinations. 



At last examinations, those terrible ordeals, are over! What a sigh 
of relief that thought causes ! We may not have been as successful, of 
course, as we had hoped to be; but let us remember that "not failure, 
but low aim, is crime." The past is past ; the future, though, lies before 
us. No low aims should mar that future for us. 



The Centennial Anniversary of the Birth of Longfellow. 

In February, like January, the centennial anniversary of the birth 
of a great American is to be celebrated. This time, we are honoring 
instead of a soldier, a poet ; the most generally beloved poet of America — 
Longfellow. His works are so dear to all, so highly appreciated by 
young and old, that there is no need of praising them. We all love his 
melodious poetry and owe him deep gratitude for the thoughts, encour- 
aging or exquisitely beautiful, that he has written. He, like the great 
general, who also was born a hundred years ago, has left the world 
richer than he found it. To quote from one of his own poems : 

" All are architects of Fate, 

Working in these walls of tftne; 
Some with massive deeds and great, 
Some with ornaments of rhyme." 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Notes. 



— Maria Tucker is at school now at Wisconsin University, where she 
went for her health. » 

— Helen Liddell enjoyed a short visit from her father during the 
month and took Susan Bynum and Katharine Henderson down to din- 
ner with her. 

— Grace Ward also enjoyed a short visit from her father recently. 

— The Florida Club has been organized with nine members. Serena 
Bailey is President and May Hoke is Secretary and Treasurer. 

— Two of the girls are very happy at present in having their fathers 
here at the Legislature. The fortunate ones are Eliza Morton and 
Lila Justice. 

— A large party of St. Mary's girls enjoyed very much a concert 
given at the Baptist University Monday night, January 21st, for 
the benefit of the Edward MacDowell Fund. Three of our teachers, 
Miss Pixley, Miss Dowd and Mrs. Irvine, took part in the program and 
added much to the enjoyment of the occasion. 

— We are glad to welcome another new girl, Esther Kembert, of 
Charleston, S. C. Her mother, formerly Christine Sanders, has the 
honor of being the only person that has ever been married in St. Mary's 
Chapel. She was married by Dr. Bennett Smedes in 1890 and came 
up with her daughter to renew old recollections. 

— We are also glad to have Lucie Swann, sister of Almera Swann, 
who was here before Christmas, with us now. Almera is not coming 
back, as she has a stenographer's position at her home, Sanford, North 
Carolina. 

— The reception given by the Agricultural Department at A. & M. 
on Thursday night, January the twenty-fourth, was very much enjoyed 
by the chemistry class of St. Mary's, who were chaperoned by Miss Pool. 

— A large party of St. Mary's girls attended the Polk Miller concert 
at the Academy of Music on the twenty-fifth of January, and all were 
delighted by his rendition of the "Old Plantation Songs." 



The St. Mart's Muse. 15 

— Amelia Whitaker, one of the day scholars who has been ill with 
pneumonia since the holidays, is steadily improving, we are glad to hear. 

— Great was the excitement and deep the interest on the night of the 
1st, when the "annual election" for "statistics" were held. The school- 
room was the polling-place and the Seniors were both judges and clerks 
of election. The throng that lingered outside the room, where the bal- 
lots were being counted, reminded one of a crowd on election night, but 
in this case the "returns" left no hard feelings and the unsuccessful con- 
gratulated the successful without a trace of lingering disappointment. 
Instead of the informal taking of sentiment of previous years, this year 
a more formal "election" was held, and after a preliminary ballot had 
disclosed the most popular candidates, a second ballot, Australian mode, 
was taken with the three leaders in each question as candidates. The 
vote disclosed that it is the opinion of the majority that Serena Bailey 
is the "Prettiest Girl" and also the "Most Energetic" ; that Sue Prince 
is the "Most Attractive," the "Most Popular" and the "Best Dancer" ; 
that Rosa Heath is the "Handsomest," and Helen Strange the "Jolliest" ; 
Nell Atkinson the "Most Coquettish" and Marguerite LeCron the 
"Most Athletic"; while Lillian Farmer is the "Cutest," Congratula- 
tions. The Seniors tell us that further information may be had from 
the Annual Muse. 






Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T Leak, Durham. 
Virir-PRirsroF'jTs i Mrs - J M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, < Mrg _ p p Tuf , ker R a l e igh, 

[ Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 



An Appeal from the Rector. 



Two years ago it was suggested that the Alumnae and friends of St. 
Mary's should contribute silver, gold and precious stones to be made 
into a beautiful chalice for the Chapel use. At that time I approved 
of the idea but thought other things were more needed ; now I think 
the time has come to do this work. 

I ask any friend of St. Mary's who has a genuine piece of old silver 
or gold plate, or jewelry, or precious stones, which she would like to 
dedicate to. this purpose, to offer them for this chalice and so unite the 
love and sentiment for St. Mary's Chapel with the sacred personal asso- 
ciations of family and friendship. 

■ There must be many broken or unused pieces of silver and gold among 
our Alumnse and friends, and what holier or better use could they be 
put to than to make them add to the glory and service of God's house ? 

The idea is to have the old chalice melted into the new, that the asso- 
ciation of the past may be blended with the hope of the future. I have 
a few contributions already and would be glad to have all gifts sent me 
by March first, so that the new chalice may be made for use at Easter. 

McISTeelt DuBose. 



Bishop's Chair. 



The Kector, having some funds in his hands for Chapel use, appealed 
to the six chapters of the Junior Auxiliary and the four Sororities to 
help him raise funds necessary to purchase a Bishop's Chair for the 
Chapel. This appeal met with such gratifying response that he at once 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



ordered the Chair from Messrs. Hann-Wangerin-Weickkardt, of Mil- 
waukee, who have already furnished for the Chapel, the Altar, Clergy- 
stalls, Fald-stool and Litany desk. The Chair will be of quartered oak 
to harmonize with all the Chapel furniture, and will stand seven feet 
three inches high to the top of the cross. We are looking for the Chair 
now any day. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 



Alice Spruill, of Louisburg, and Katie Barbee, of Ealeigh, are two 
of a party of North Carolina girls who have been "seeing the sights" of 
New York with the Evening Times party. 



Miss Kate Meares, who assisted Miss Alice Jones during the early 
part of this session in the Latin Department at Winthrop while the 
regular teacher was ill, now has charge of the Latin and History in the 
Bennettsville (S. C.) High School. 

St, Mary's has no more loyal alunmse anywhere than Mrs. Crenshaw 
(Kate Davis) and her daughter, Helen, of Louisburg.. Helen, after 
spending two years at Converse, is now at Gunston Hall, Washington, 
but she never loses her interest in things here and is always ready to 
prove it. 

Of the three vestrymen of Trinity Church, Columbus, Ga., who at- 
tended our Chapel service on Sexagesima Sunday, two were drawn to 
St. Mary's by personal bonds. The daughter of the eldest, May Wells, 
of Columbus, attended school here in the '90's, while Mr. E. W. Pou 
is the husband of Hettie Hunter, who was a school-mate of Miss Dowd. 
Both gentlemen were anxious to meet "Miss Katie" and Miss Dowd, of 
whom they had heard much. 

We are always appreciative of the interest of our friend, Mrs. Aiken, 
who in sending us some Georgia post-cards, writes : "I am spending part 
of the winter in Eastern Georgia, so send these historical post-cards, 
which may be of interest as well as good subjects for pencil and brush. 
May 1907 prove a happy year to St. Mary's, and may she experience 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



St. Paul's conception of "From Glory unto Glory" to be attained even 
in this world is the wish of an old St. Mary's girl." 

Jane Iredell Green writes that she is having a very busy time this 
winter as debutante and "school-teacher" in Wilmington, her home town. 
She has charge of the First Grade in one of the public schools there. 

Mary Holton Hunter has gotten off for her winter in Mississippi 
and is now with her aunt, Mrs. F. Read Hawkins, at Winona, that State. 
She will be there during the spring. Mattie Hunter, Muse readers will 
remember, is at the Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore, this winter. 

Miss Margaret Jones, who resigned her work at Mrs. Loucks' Semi- 
nary in Flushing at Christmas, and has since then been teaching in New 
York City, will be one of a party, including several St. Mary's girls, 
which will spend the spring in southern Europe. They sail from New 
York for Naples the latter part of February. The party includes Miss 
Mary Horner, Miss Susan Graham and Miss Kate Horner, of Oxford, 
N. C, Miss Gertrude Winston, of Durham, Miss Margaret and Miss 
Mary Pride Jones. 

Nichols-Massey. 

Miss Winifred Ross Massey, daughter of Prof, and Mrs. W. T. 
Massey, of 205 St. Mark's Square, West Philadelphia, was married at 
her parents' home at 11 o'clock to Charles Arthur Nichols, of Musko- 
gee, Indian Territory. The Rev. Dr. S. M. Robinson, of the Protestant 
Episcopal Divinity School, officiated. 

The maid of honor was Miss Mabel Massey, of Raleigh, N. C, and 
the best man Hansley Massey, of Haverford. 

With the marriage of "Winnie," the second of the three "Masseys" 
who were St. Mary's girls, enters upon married happiness. "Bessie," 
Elizabeth Willing Massey, as they called her on the Commencement 
programs in 1905, was married a year ago to Dr. Raymond Dean 
Thompson, of Jasper, Florida. The girls are indeed scattering widely. 

Hearty congratulations and best wishes to our new friends in the 
new State of Oklahoma. 



READ !— MARK, I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls anri the 
readers of The Muss generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 



TO MAKE YOUR 

PHUTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



Scholarship Examination. 



Competitive examinations for the SMEDES and the MURCHISON SCHOLAR 
SHIPS in St. Mary's School will be held in those parishes of the Carolinas in which 
there are candidates during the first week in May of this year, and the successful 
candidates will enter upon their school work in September. 

Candidates for these Scholarships must be at least fourteen years of a^e and 
ready to enter the Freshman Class at St. Mary's. The Smedes Scholarship f s open 
to any qualified candidate residing in either of the Carolinas; the holder of the 
Hurchison Scholarship must be a resident of the Diocese of East Carolina 

Full information, with detailed requirements, and application blanks, will be fur- 
nished on request. 

These Scholarships cover all expenses, and are good for four years to the holder 
who complies with the requirements. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL CO 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES FINE SHOES fi£© SLIPPERS 



..Send to... 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 

SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks arid supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the ouly perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W. C. STMACH'S SOSS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTBVILLE STREET 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



The Widow. 

Tommy greased the stairs with soap; 
Father struck the slimy slope; 
Ma said: "My, ain't Tom got tact! 
" I always looked so well in black." 

— Cornell Widow. 



HE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



. ROSENTHAL 

HO. j 

G R Q C K R S 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 P. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any articlb selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 



J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

"WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORK, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



"If love is blind, how is it, pray, 
That love will always find a way?" 
"When Cupid hits the mark, he usually Mrs. it." 

"It would seem as if Cupid burnt his fingers with every new match he ignited." 
"Some men propose just to tell their chums they have been accepted." 

— "A Cynic's Meditations." 



"Cupid is not so childish as he looks. He can put one and one together very 
nicely." 

"In the female vocabulary, men may come and men may go, but shops go on 
forever." 

"One thing that always carries its face value — a kiss." 

"Usually when a woman tells her lover to 'Go ! ' she means, 'Go — and come back.' " 

— "A Cynic's Meditations." 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N. C . 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Capacity, 60.000 feet per day. 



Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Prvate Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S. 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



ROBT SIMPSON, 



ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 


FOR QUICK COOKING 

nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS EEADY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 


FOR LIGHT 

Use the best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


INGRATITUDE. 

I think it ill becomes a Man — 
(Though he be sorely swat), 

Because his House has blown away. 
To grumble at his Lot. 


THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


BARRETT & THOMPSON— Architects 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO , 
PRINTERS A.NTD BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, GENERAL AGENT, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK . 

Raleigh, N. C. 


GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 




RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital $15,000 Surplus $25,000. Deposits over 
8600,000. Four percent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. 


POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, 8225,000. Surplus and Profits, $115,000. 

Chas. H. Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timbeelake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

ARTISTIC FURNITURE. 
We make a specialty of odd pieces in 
Antique and Modern Designs. 
Call and see us. 

Rotall & Borden Furniture Co , 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., 

Raleigh, N C. 



HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
2 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Irt Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers 
Best of everything in our line 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



JOHN C. DREWRY. 
'MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE. 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital, $ 100,000.00 

Surplus, - - lOO.OOO.OO 

Deposits, - 1,175,000.00 

Assets, - 1,500,000.00 

Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 

J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work suchas Altars 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEIOKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY 
All Sorts of Building Supplies ' 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, !906-'07. 



FEBRUARY MARCH. 



January 26, Saturday, 8 p. m.— Muse Club: "Japanese Tea." 
February 2, Saturday, 8 p. m. — Junior Reception to Seniors. 
February 7, Thursday, 8 p. m. — Musicale in honor of the Governor and his staff, the 

State officers, and the Legislature. 
February 9, Saturday, 8 p. m— Muse Club : "Cupid in Shirtsleeves." 
February 12, Tuesday, 8 p. m. — 
February 13, Wednesday— Ash Wednesday— Holy Day. Lent Begins. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
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and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 

S ° U For r t I ime-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. OATTIS, C B. RYAN, EDWARD F. COST, 

Traveling Paasenger Agent, General Passenger Agent, Second Vice-President 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 









^catio n Centra ^ for the Caro linas. 

Climate Heattlnj and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. EH 

(jor girls and young ivomen). 
55th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1906. 






I 



'?. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. ; '; ■ 
3, THE BUSINESS SCHOOL 
i-/fff& ART SOIIOOE 

HHhHHHHHHHHI 




Twenty-five.. Members in the Faculty. 



Pianos. 

attention to the S< 
idle training, 

Glof^&kd qifoer information address 



'fit. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
rUtian side of Education without slight 






lent flumber 



St Gary's rtfouse 



flDarcb, 1007 



* 



ttatefgb, n. (C. 



JK 





















The St. Mary's Muse. 



LENT NUMBER. 



March, 1907. No. 8. 



A Violet. 



ALICE McCULLERS 



To you this violet means but a flower, 

While to me it means a dream 
Of the dearest child in the wide, wide world, 

And her smile when she gave it to me. 

'Twas by that smile so sweet and pure 
That I learned to love her — oh ! so much. 

I knew not why, I cared not why, — 
I only knew that I loved her so. 

And did I crave her love, you ask, 
Or was I content with loving her? 

At first methinks I did not care 
Whether or not she loved me too. 

And though in after days I've found 
That her true heart could ne'er be mine, 

And I have tried to forget the child, 
And the little flower she gave me, too, 

I somehow hope that that pure love 

That thrilled my heart so through and through, 
Will not die out, but linger there 

And lift my soul to higher things. 



Mieclo. 



SERENA COBIA BAILEY. 



It was almost dark in the little room far up in the tenement building, 
and to Mieclo it seemed strangely quiet, too. That evening no children 
came running in to ask if he would play for them, none came to beg 
him to relate stories of his childhood in Poland. He was glad, though, 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



that they did not come, for how could he tell them again, as he had done 
the day before, that he could not play now, and that his heart was too 
heavy for story-telling ? And yet he missed the tenement children, for 
they loved him, and he them, and once his dearest, sweetest music had 
been for their ears. 

His loneliness for them, however, was but a part of his heartsickness, 
his longing for what could never be ; for the future that, once apparently 
in his grasp, was now but a harrowing dream. Again and again there 
rang in his ears the words of the doctor, "You must not play for many 
years ; perhaps then your arm will be strong ; but if you use it now, you 
will permanently injure it." Sometimes he did not believe the doctor; 
doctors were often rather tricky people, yet he knew that it must be true, 
for the pain was often so severe that he was not always able to deceive 
himself and hope that the doctor was wrong. 

In the semi-darkness of that barren little room, life seemed to hold 
nothing for the boy; music his all — except Aeva — was deprived him. 
What was there left ? Not Aeva, for now that he could play the violin 
no more, how could he bring her from across the sea ? He was miserable 
and utterly wretched, and he would not want her, too, to be unhappy. 
How was it all to end \ Why was it that he had been made to suffer so ? 
Why was he here anyway, lonely, unhappy, with no hope or joy for the 

future ? 

Down in the corner lay his violin in its old case. He had taken it up 
many times that day and had caressed it as one does only one's greatest 
treasures. He took it out once more and started to play, but again his 
heart would not let him. Poor little violin, no one but he knew the 
secrets of its soul ; it had told them to him many times. 

How infinitely was the life of the violin bound up in his life and that 
of Aeva ! He and the violin had told her of his hopes, his ambitions, 
his love. Only through the aid of the violin could he ever hope to send' 
for her. It was she who had inspired much of the depth, the nobility of 
feeling in his interpretation of music. She, alone, in his childhood had 
fully understood him. She had counciled him, laughingly teased him, 
encouraged him, just as her changing mood dictated. Yet through it 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



all she was devoted, heart and soul, to him. It was such a long, long 
time, he mused now, since they had been together; since he had played 
to her in the twilight. Sometimes she had sung while he played. Her 
voice was a contralto, full of sweetness, pathos and mysticism. 

And her face ! He could see it so vividly, with its dark, tumbled hair 
and dimpling mouth, and the eyes, oh, the eyes ! When one saw them 
one could scarcely remember anything else in her face — or in the world ! 
It was for her, for her that he had been living and playing and now ! 

He was so absorbed in his thoughts he did not notice that the door 
had opened and that his friend, old Henryk, had come in. "Mieclo, 
Mieclo, boy, where are you, dreaming again ; not playing this time ?" 
The boy started up from the floor, where he had been kneeling by his 
violin-case. "Oh Henryk, you do not know — I cannot tell you, oh Mother 
of God, Henryk — I cannot make her talk to me any more ! The doctor 
has told me— you know the pain in my arm— well, the doctor has said 
that I must not play for years ! How can it be ? What can I do, 
Henryk ? She cannot talk to me any more !" 

Mieclo flung himself sobbing on the floor. Old Henryk, knowing the 
boy well, did not try to comfort him, but paced up and down, his kind 
heart aching for the sorrow of his young friend. 

At last he bent over Mieclo. "What does the Master say ?" he asked. 
"The Master, the Master sent me to the doctor, he said the doctor would 
know! Oh Henryk leave me, for not even you can help me." Then he 
sprang up and threw his arms impulsively around the old man's neck. 
"Henryk, I need not ask you to forgive me, for you can understand !" 

Suddenly the young fellow stopped— "Henryk, you came here to- 
night for a special reason ; you never come as late as this. Tell me, is 
Hania worse again?" 

"No," the elder man answered. "And Mieclo, I want to talk of you, 
what you are going to do now." 

"There is nothing that I want to do ; I know that I can never play, 
and playing is my life. Besides," half angrily, "I must hear why you 
came, dear Henryk ; perhaps there is enough of the old Mieclo left to 
help you if you need his help." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Old Henryk turned to the window. "Mieclo, what you wish me to 
tell you is not of Hania or me, but of a new family that has moved into 
our house. They are from your town, Mieclo ; the man is ill, about to 
die, I think, and they are so poor, so poor. I thought — I knew — that 
you would help them — play for their benefit to-night at the restaurant. 
But boy, don't worry about this ; the good God will cure your troubles 
and theirs." The boy flung himself at Henryk. "What is the name? 
Romaszko, you say \ Oh holy St. Nicholas ! Is Aeva with them 8" 

"No, only one son; the other children are in Poland." 

"Aeva's mother and father and little Sisgismund here and suffering ! 
Listen, Henryk, leave me now, for I cannot think or talk. Only go! 
I will see you to-morrow." 

Mieclo began walking up and down excitedly, and the old man, know- 
ing it was best to leave him, slipped quietly out. The boy did not notice 
Henryk's departure. Again he took his violin from its case, this time 
not to caress it tenderly, but to grasp it sobbingly and passionately in 
his arms. He sat there long in the darkness or strode excitedly around 
the room. At last he threw himself exhausted on the bed; his arms 
still holding the beloved violin, his lips ever whispering, "I must play, 
I must play for them — for her." 

(To be concluded in April.) 



My Cupid. 

MARGUERITE V. THOMPSON. 



A rose, a fading rose, — I paused, — 

It seemed to call to me, 
And as I gazed it raised its head 

And feebly made its plea. 
A message, yes, a message, 

From one so far away. 
Longer I paused, and wondering stooped; 

What had this rose to say? 
The browning petals freshened, 

The rose seemed all inspired: 
Could this flower bring the message 

My longing heart desired? 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



I bent my head and listened. 

Its message soft and clear 
Rang out through the evening twilight : 

"All's well, he loves you, dear." 
Then the flower's heart ceased beating, 

Those leaves, too, soon were dried; 
Its mission on this earth was o'er, 

And so my Cupid died. 



The Old BricK House. 



JENNIE B. SIMPSON. 



Near the banks of the Pasquotank stands a very quaint, but a very 
plain little brick house. Its sides are of wood, but the corners are of 
deep yellow bricks brought over by the English many, many years ago. 
On each end of the old house are two peculiar shaped gables, which 
make it look as if it were the abiding place of dwarfs. 

The inside of the old house is also very peculiar, for the rooms are 
circular in shape, while very beautiful architectural effects adorn the high 

arched walls. The fireplaces are wide and deep — truly old-fashioned 

and would make one dream of the Yule logs which had been happily 
burned in them and see in the many-hued flames pictures of the lad 
and lassie sitting by the old chimney-corner, dreaming dreams and mak- 
ing air-castles for the future. But the old house saw scenes very differ- 
ent from these, for it was at one time the headquarters of Black Beard, 
the pirate, and in the dark, damp cellars underneath he kept his cap- 
tives, and in the many secret hiding places of the building he stored his 
piles of stolen goods. 

At the foot of the steps are two large mill-stones on which are carved 
"1732," the supposed date of the building. In one of the rooms is a 
big, dark old closet, the back of which is made of beautifully carved 
wood. No one would ever dream that one of its panels conceals the 
wondrous secret closet which was talked of for miles around, but which 
was known to none except Black Beard himself. In the secret closet 
opens a tiny trap-door which leads to the underground passage to Pirate's 
Bay, where Black Beard's ships used to come to give up their treasures 
before sailing out again in search of new adventures. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



In the second floor of the house, reached by a winding staircase, is 
a dark old room, on the floor of which are many blood stains ; for the 
pirate, it is said, did not hesitate to murder anyone who refused to do 
his slightest bidding. A story is told of a young girl and her old negro 
mammy who were captured by Black Beard and kept in this very room 
for many weeks, to be at last murdered because they would not cease 
to pray that God would deliver them. On damp days the stains seem 
as vividly red as the blood itself, and on stormy nights cries and moans 
can be heard coming from the old garret room. Yet this is only one 
of the many strange tales connected with the old brick house which 
attract to it visitors at all times. 



The Home of Jefferson Davis. 



LELA JEMISON. 



Of all the old historic homes there is none more interesting to a 
Southerner than the home of Jefferson Davis, which is now very ap- 
propriately used as a home for old Confederate soldiers. 

In 1875 Davis, having retired from political life, wished to make 
his home in some quiet, out of the way place, where in solitude he might 
write his valuable work "The Eise and Fall of the Confederate Gov- 
ernment." Such a sequestered place Davis found on the gulf coast of 
Mississippi, at Beauvoir, midway between Mississippi City and Boluxi. 

It was on a cool, clear day, just after one of those terrible storms so 
common on the coast in September, that a party of us left Mississippi 
City for a visit to Beauvoir. We had a most pleasant drive of several 
miles up a smooth, shady avenue paved with crushed shells and white 
sand. On one side of the avenue is a forest, where grow representatives 
of all the Southern trees, while on the other is seen nothing but the 
broad expanse of the great gulf, dotted here and there with the white 
sails of the many ships. As we drew nearer to the home of Davis we 
were impressed with the quietness and the peacefulness of the place. 
The grounds include about five acres, covered with immense live-oaks 
with twittering birds hopping among the branches, and long festoons 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



of dull grey moss drooping from them. Under these trees the shade is 
very dense and it is here that the old soldiers while away many hours, 
listening to the songs of the birds and to the murmuring of the waves 
playing with the little pebbles on the shore. 

The house, which faces the gulf, is of only one story, but is built on 
very high pillars, with a wide veranda almost encircling it. As we 
ascended the broad front steps and crossed the veranda with its huge 
square columns, we were met by a courteous old soldier who invited us 
into a large room, somewhat bare, which, we were told later, was Mr. 
Davis' library. This room contains a few of the personal possessions 
of Davis and it is here that everyone was asked to sit down at Mr. Davis 7 
own desk and register his name. Then the old soldier took delight in 
pointing out a little oblong trunk of tan leather, much abused by travel, 
which he told us was the one Mr. Davis always used on his trips to 
Europe. The bed-room, with its little narrow beds in a row on each side 
of the room, reminded us of a St. Mary's dormitory ; and in the dining- 
room the long, neatly set table, with the white mosquito netting spread 
over it, took us back to the soldier's camp life during the war days. The 
other parts of the house are very much like the library, extremely clean, 
but scantily furnished, giving always an impression of bareness. 

When we were in the yard again, taking a last look at the noble Con- 
federate's home, seeming even more quiet now than during his lifetime, 
the faithful old soldier brought us a handful of moss, which he had 
just gathered from the surrounding trees. He asked us to keep it as 
a souvenir, and bidding us good-bye, "thanked us kindly" for our visit. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 

Georgia Stanton Hales, '09, Editor. 



Musicale Complimentary to the Legislature. 

The musicale given at St. Mary's School on Thursday evening, Feb- 
ruary 7th, was complimentary to the Governor and his staff, the State 
officers, the justices of the Supreme Court and the members of the Leg- 
islature. Friends of the school and the music-loving public were also 
invited, and the evening was thoroughly enjoyed by the appreciative 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



audience assembled. The opening and closing numbers of the program 
were given by the St. Mary's orchestra, under the direction of Miss Hull. 
This orchestra is an old friend of the Kaleigh public, and its re-appear- 
ance after a long period of silence, was enthusiastically welcomed. Mr. 
A. W. Vincent, the able director of music at St. Mary's played Chopin's 
Polonaise in A major with sure touch and brilliant technique and keen 
appreciation of the material spirit of the composition. 

The serenade from Haydn's String Quartette No. 17 was beautifully 
rendered by Misses Hull, P. Johnson, M. DuBose and Dr. Summey. 
There is promise of further enjoyment from the same source in the 
future. 

Mrs. Agnes Vincent was in good voice and sang three ballads charm- 
ingly with a pure resonant voice and a beautiful conception. 

Miss Charlotte Kendall Hull delighted her hearers with a beautiful 
tone poem of Van Goens, Romance op. 12 No. 1, and with a dainty 
serenade by Pierne, but she declined to respond to the very hearty encore 
with which she was greeted. 

The second movement of the beautiful MacDowell Concerto op. 15 
was given by Mrs. J. Harrison-Irvine in her usual brilliant style, with 
power, finished technique and artistic interpretation. 

Miss Cribbs varied the program with "A Van Bibber Sketch" charm- 
ingly recited. This was received with much applause to which Miss 
Cribbs responded with "Not a Success," which as an encore belied its 
name, for it left the audience in roars of laughter over the vivid picture 
of human nature under humorous difficulties. 

The Grieg Sonata op. 8, for piano and violin was splendidly played 
by Miss Hull and Mr. Vincent. The players showed themselves appre- 
ciative of the exquisite melodic effects of this modern sonata, so evenly 
balanced between the two instruments ; and they gave the whole piece 
with easy technique and with warm and spirited interpretation which 
worked up to a worthy climax in the "Allegro molto vivace" movement. 

The interesting program was closed with a Hungarian Gipsy Dance 
by St. Mary's orchestra. 



The St. Maet's Muse. 



Students' Recital. 

The Students' Eecital on Friday evening, January 8th, was enjoyed 
very much and the girls are to be congratulated on their playing and 
singing, which showed they had been well taught. This was the first 
of the Student Eecitals this year, and it is Mr. Vincent's intention to 
have them every two or three weeks. 

The program was as follows: 

Intermezzo Jennie Mle Turner 

Recollections Ruth Newbold 

Jane Stillman 

BarcaroIle Margaret Pennington 

Heart's Fancies t i ■ ^-i 

' Josephine Gilmer 

Berceuse, E Major— a, Karganoff Frankie Self 

Melody in F for Violin— Rubenstein- Brownie Adicks 

Mary Wiggins at the Piano. 

Pendant la Mazurka— Paul Wachs Margaret Williams 

Thy Parting Kiss Alexina Hardy 

Romanza Maude Eberhardt 

The Cameron Reception. 

On Thursday afternoon, February 7th, Mrs. Benehan Cameron gave 
a very large and delightful reception at her beautiful home on Hillsboro 
street. Three hundred guests were invited, and from the steady stream 
of people that poured in during the afternoon almost every invitation 
must have been accepted. 

The hall and reception rooms, so well suited to the occasion, lent them- 
selves gracefully to the luxurious decorations in roses and ferns. The 
punch bowl, which was in the library, was presided over by Mrs. Irvine 
from St. Mary's, In the dining-room the color scheme was pink, and a 
very charming effect was produced by the pink roses and shining old 
mahogany. Delicious refreshments were served. Maria Webb, an old 
St. Mary's girl, and Helen Strange assisted in the dining-room. 

St. Mary's School was well represented by the faculty. Those present 
were: Misses Pool, McKimmon, Dowd, Sutton, Lee, Fenner, Cribbs, 
Hull, Pixley, DuBose and Smith. 

"Cupid in Shirt Sleeves." 
An original play entitled "Cupid in Shirt Sleeves" was given by the 
Muse Club on the evening of February the 9th, and was an entire sue- 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

cess. All the actresses took their parts cleverly, and we give them our 
heartiest congratulations. Miss Eloise Kobinson, in her role of the 
nervous old doctor, kept the amused audience laughing with her con- 
tinual "talking, talking, always talking, this talking makes me nervous." 
And Miss Strange, as the hero of the scene, pulled out of her "punk" 
situation remarkably well and made quite an ardent suitor to Miss 
Sue Prince, who tactfully and cleverly helped her lover out of his 
difficulty. Miss Sydney Gabbett proved herself an able manager of a 
nervous husband, and Miss Chapman we recommend as a capable men- 
der and lady's maid. I'm quite sure everyone enjoyed the well selected 
and entertaining little play. 
The cast was : 

Dr. Fielding Eloise ^ obinson 

Mabel, his Wife S y dne y Gabbett 

Ada, her Sister Sue Brent Prmce 

Eugene Pelham, Ada's Lover Helen Strange 

Jane, the Maid Jessie Chapman 



In Lighter Vein, 



Mr. Stone (in History class). — "Miss D. — who was the next king?" 
Girl. — "Er — the next king was Queen Elizabeth, I think." 
K. H. (discussing a poem she had just written for English). — "I 
wrote my poem in spondulyx !" 

(Let us explain that she meant spondaic.) 

First girl (looking through a new book). — "Isn't this first picture 

pretty ?" 

Second girl. — "Yes, and wouldn't it look lovely done in waterworks ?" 

I. T. (to E. D., who is brushing her hair). — "Ellen, you must have 
a lot of personal magnetism for your hair has so much electricity in it." 

E. D. — "Margaret, who was the first white child born in America ?" 

M. C. — "Why Pocahontas, of course." 

E. D. (in the middle of the night). — "I wish that train would stop 
blowing, I can't go to sleep." 

P. H. — "That's no train, it's just Irving snoring." 



The St. Mary's Muse. n 



Mr. Stone (in Junior-Senior History).— "Who founded the Eoman 
Empire ?" 

Pupil. — "Christendom — I think it was he!" 

Mash.— "I think Helen's poem is the best one in the February Muse. 
But I haven't read any of the others." 



Alphabet at S. M. S. 



IRVING MORGAN. 



A is for Art, which we all think is prime; 

B is for Bible, which we hear all the time. 

C is for Chapel, where we go twice a day; 

D is for Dormitory, where you bet we are «ay. 

E is for English, where you can't be a fool, 

F is for French, which is under Miss Pool. 

G is for Grove, where at last we are free, 

H is for History, where the points we can't see. 

I is for Infirmary, where our pains we confess, 

J is for Jail, which we call S. M. S. 

K is for Kitchen, where we have to keep out, 

L is for Latin, which we know naught about. 

M is for Mash which we all adore, 

N is for Night, which we wish would come more. 

is for Organ (it is played here a lot), 

P is for Parlor, which at night we make hot. 

Q is for Quiet, which is sure hard to be, 

R is for Roll, which sounds natural to me. 

S is for Supper, which we have Sunday night; 

T is for Teacher, who makes us do right. 

U is for Unladylike, which of course we are never, 

V is for Verbs, which we are saying forever. 

W is for Walking hour, our only time to be free; 
X is for Xerxes, whom we learn of in History B. 

Y is for Yard, where we sure go, you bet, and 
Z is for Zero, which sometimes we get. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Entered into rest at eight o'clock on the evening of February 2 2d 
suddenly after an illness of several weeks, Miss Sara H. Spurlock, late 
teacher in St. Mary's School. 

Like a lightning-flash from a clear sky came the announcement on the afternoon of 
the 22d that Miss Spurlock had had a turn for the worse and was critically ill. 
Without rallying, conscious to the last, despite all that medical skill could do, she 
sank rapidly, and at eight o'clock passed away. 

Though she had been a chronic sufferer for years, Miss Spurlock's will power was 
so great that she was able to conceal the state of her health, and only those who 
knew her intimately were really aware of what she was enduring. She never com- 
plained and was always ready for her duties, and even when she had to yield for a 
time to what proved to be her last illness, her friends supposed it would be but a 
short time before she was herself and about again. She had been ill since January 
25th, but recently was much better. 

Miss Spurlock's home was in Tennessee, and there she has a sister and a brother 
living, the only surviving members of her immediate family. There was not time 
for these relatives to reach Raleigh, but her life-long friend, Mrs. Eugene Little, of 
Wadesboro, with whom she spent the Christmas holidays, was summoned and arrived 
Friday nighty 

School exercises were suspended on Saturday, and funeral services were held in 
the Chapel at half-past one. Mr. DuBose read the impressive burial service, and the 
hymns "For all Thy saints who from their labors rest," "Ten thousand times ten 
thousand" and "The King of love my Shepherd is" were sung. There were beautiful 
flowers, tributes of sympathy from the faculty and pupils of St. Mary's, from the 
sister schools, and from friends in town. Mrs. Little and the loving friends she had 
made at St. Mary's during her short stay here were all around. 

After the services, the body was taken to the four-o'clock Seaboard train and sent 
to McMinnville, Tenn., Mrs. Little accompanying it. There the final services were 
held on Monday, the 25th. The escort from St. Mary's to the station was composed 
of Mr. and Mrs. DuBose and Mrs. Iredell, the faculty of St. Mary's, and the presi-j 
dents of the college classes representing the students. 

Miss Spurlock was a member of an old Tennessee family, and was educated at 
Peabody Normal College and the University of Cincinnati, completing her training 
as a teacher by two years study at the University of Berlin. She had had an exten- 
sive teaching experience, and before coming to st. Mary's was for several years at 
Ward Seminary, Nashville. 

Intellectual and refined, she stood for high principles, honor, and honest work; 
her inspiring personality as a teacher impressed itself upon her classes, and her 
absence from the daily school life will be keenly felt by both teachers and pupils. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription. One Year. = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Serena C. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 

Georgia S. Hales, Elizabeth Waddill. Helen Strange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Sallie Haywood Battle. 

Beatrice B. Cohen and Jessie Page Harris, Business Managers. 



EDITORIAL. 



Lent. 



With the return of Lent there comes the thought and purpose of self- 
improvement and self-mastery. It may indeed be a time of special fast- 
ing, but upon that point we should not lay too much stress. It is not 
of so much importance whether or not we give up a few luxuries of diet, 
sometimes to feel immense self-satisfaction from having done so* but 
it is the gaining of a more complete control over ourselves that should 
be the result of our Lenten discipline. As fasting is an already 
accepted part of this discipline, let us strive to perform a more essential 
duty. Lent, as we know, is a period for introspection and repentance. 
It is a seed-time as spring is a seed-time of the year. If in Lent we 
strive to overcome certain defects in our characters, to make ourselves 
more nearly like the Master, and to make the world a happier place 
for all with whom we come in contact, and resolve to make such an 
effort, not only for Lent itself, but for all the months and years to come, 
then and then only have we caught the true Lenten spirit. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Concentration. 



Did you ever think of how much time we waste by not giving our 
complete attention to whatever thing we are doing at that moment % We 
may be trying to study, and yet our mind is wandering over various ■ 
other subjects not connected with the lesson ; or we may be attempting 
to take some kind of recreation, yet be worrying about the next day's 
duties. Can we get the best results from such poor attention? Em- 
phatically no. It is of the greatest importance to learn how to center 
our attention or to be able to relax ourselves entirely. It is a trite 
saying that "We should work while we work and play while we play ;" 
but unfortunately, most of us do not keep this saying well in mind. If 
we try to cultivate our voluntary attention and the habit of perfect re- 
laxation when necessary, we will gradually find an improvement in our 
work and in our general mental power. 



Gossip. 



There is- one thing that most of us might try to do in Lent. It seems 
a small matter, perhaps, and it is a fault that may arise from no real 
unkindness of heart ; but it is often very far-reaching in its evil results. 
We refer to that habit of gossiping of which we see so many examples 
in school life. For at school as well as at any other place there is a great 
deal of such misdirected interest in our neighbor's business. It is ex- 
tremely easy to make slighting remarks about people or to be intolerant 
of their faults and actions. Let us try to remember, however, what 
harm often comes from thoughtless remarks and discussions, and let us 
strive to say nothing at all if we cannot say anything kind — and how 
seldom it is that something good is not to be found ! 



The Death of Miss SpurlocK- 



The death of Miss Spurloek saddened the hearts of every member of 
the faculty and the student body ; for although she had been among us 
only a few months, this being her first year at St. Mary's, she had shown 
herself to be not only an unusually efficient teacher, but also a strong, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



noble woman. Her conscientious, helpful daily life was an excellent ex- 
ample for the girls. To them, she was always friendly and helpful, and 
quick to give an encouraging, inspiring word. She is truly missed by 
all who knew her. The remembrance of her high qualities of mind and 
soul, however, will always remain to strengthen and ennoble us. 



Dr. DuBose's Resignation. 



It was with deep regret that the many friends of Dr. MclSTeely Du- 
Bose heard of his resignation of the rectorship of St. Mary's. After 
Dr. Bratton was elected to the Bishopric of Mississippi, Dr. DuBose 
left his parish in Asheville, where for fourteen years he had been the 
beloved rector, and in September, 1902, he took upon himself the duties 
of a new life. 

Dr. DuBose has felt most deeply the responsibility of training the 
young womanhood of our land, and his work at St. Mary's has been 
marked by the same earnestness and faithfulness that characterized 
his former labors. With loving fervor he has worked for the spiritual 
welfare of those entrusted to his care. May he realize, even in this life, 
some of the fruits of his labors, even as the bread upon the waters re- 
turns after many days. 

When we turn from the intangible to the things that are seen, we 
find many delightful changes that have taken place during the present 
regime. 

St. Mary's now stands for the first time financially unencumbered, 
and ready to turn her attention to those improvements that are needed 
for the high destiny we believe to be hers. The number of boarding 
pupils is larger than ever before, and the increased size of the chapel 
is a constant delight. The last mentioned improvement has been made 
by enlarging the chancel and building transcepts. Now we have a beau- 
tiful chapel, cruceform in structure, with room for five hundred wor- 
shippers. The new altar is one of unusual beauty, and we have all 
things needful for the solemn dignity of our matchless ritual. 

The Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Auditorium, which will accom- 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



modate with all comfort an audience of six hundred, is now on the eve 
of completion. 

Dr. DuBose is a man of unusual ability and profound knowledge of 
the Bible, as is shown in the depth, beauty and helpfulness of his ser- 
mons; and few fail to realize that the daily worship is the soul that 
transforms the life of St. Mary's. 

Mrs. DuBose has for four years been our school mother ; and as she 
moves among us full of sympathy in sorrow, of patient cheerfulness 
when skies are overclouded, of happiness in the joys of others, losing 
all pettinesses in life's great perspective, she is as the sweet presence 
of a good diffused. When these, our friends, go from us they will leave 
with us deep appreciation of loving, faithful service ; and they will 
take with them our love and blessing into whatsoever life God may call 

them. M. E. S. 

School Notes. 



Dr. Marshall, of Christ church, exchanged with Mr. DuBose on Sun- 
day, February 10th, and gave us a very beautiful and impressive sermon. 

Sadie Thomas and Frankie Self enjoyed a short visit from their 
fathers during the month, and Mary Spruill one from her uncle. Manie 
Leake Parsons also enjoyed a visit from her father, and had the pleasure 
of going with him to "Parsifal." 

Several of the other girls also went to "Parsifal" and they said it was 
fine. 

Nancy Benedict's friends were very glad to see her again when she 
stopped by with her cousin, Coatsie Benedict, for a day or two. 

Our sympathy is with Wilhemina Harlow, who was called home be- 
cause of the death of her little niece. 

We are glad to have Bettie Sturgeon, who was called home on account 
of her father's illness, back with us again. Her father, we are glad to 
say, is much better. 

Interest in the Annual has been steadily increasing, and everyone 
was excited when on Monday, February 11th, the pictures for it were 
taken. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



At recent meetings of the Literary Societies the Commencement mar- 
shals were chosen, as follows: Grace Ward, E. A. P., Chief; Eva Roger- 
son and Annie Wells, E. A. P. ; Susan Bynum and Sadie Thomas, Sigma 
Lambda. 

Preparations are now well in hand for the Inter-Society Debate, which 
is on the program for Easter Week. Epsilon Alpha Pi is the challenger 
this year, flushed with victory in the last contest, while Sigma Lambda, 
anxious to wipe out the memory of defeat, is quite ready for the fray. 
The query has not yet been decided upon, but Lillian Farmer, '07, and 
Louise Hill, '07, will speak for E. A. P., while Serena Bailey and Helen 
Strange will represent Sigma Lambda. 

The meeting of the Trustees on the 20th to discuss the selection of a 
Eector to succeed Mr. DuBose and to consider other plans looking to the 
increased usefulness of St. Mary's was a matter of much interest to all 
at the school. The gentlemen took lunch with us at two o'clock, and a 
most pleasant feature of the visit was the "after-dinner speech" of Bishop 
Capers, made to us at the request of Mr. DuBose. In a happy combina- 
tion of the light and the serious he sought to impress upon us the im- 
portance of improving the hours, and in his few minutes talk made his 
way straight into our hearts. 

There were present at the meeting Bishop Cheshire, of North Carolina, 
Bishop Capers, of South Carolina, and Bishop Strange, of East Caro- 
lina ; Rev. W. P. Witsell, of Columbia, and Mr. P. T. Hayne, of Green- 
ville, Trustees from South Carolina ; Rev. Dr. R, B. Drane, of Edenton, 
and Mr. G. C. Royall, of Goldsboro, Trustees from East Carolina ; Mr. 
F. A. Clinard, of Hickory, Trustee from the District of Asheville, and 
Rev. Dr. F. J. Murdoch, of Salisbury, Mr. W. A. Erwin, of Durham ; 
and Rev. Dr. Marshall, Hon. R. H. Battle, Dr. R H. Lewis, and Col! 
Chas. E. Johnson, of Raleigh, Trustees from North Carolina, with Dr. 
K. P. Battle, Jr., of Raleigh, Secretary of the Board. The result of the 
deliberations of the Board has not yet been made public. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 
f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
„ Tm I Mrs. 1 M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 

Vice-Presidents, J. Mrs F p Tucker , Raleigh, 

[ Mrs. Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Alumnae News. 

New Bern, N. C, Feb. 17, 1907. 
The St. Mary's Muse, Raleigh, N. C. 

Dear Editors : —The February number of the Muse with its ever-welcome news, 
has just reached me, and I am ashamed to find that I have not yet paid my sub- 
scription. 

I want to congratulate you on the improvement in the magazine and tell you how 
much I enjoy it. It means so much more to me now that I am away from you than 
it ever did before. 

With best wishes for its continued success, I am, 

Very sincerely yours, Myrtle L. Disoswat. 

By the will of the late Mrs. Chas. H. Belvin a bequest was left in 
trust to Miss Kate McKimmon for the purpose of putting a memorial in 
St. Mary's Chapel in memory of Mrs. Belvin's daughter, Miss Nannie, 
who was a graduate and afterwards a teacher in St. Mary's, and passed 
away in 1905. Mr. Belvin and Miss McKimmon, after a consultation, 
have decided that this memorial shall take the form of a window, and 
it is hoped to have it in place this spring. 

St. Mark's Rectory, Augusta, Maine, 

February 21, 1907. 

To the Editors of The Muse. 

My Dear Girls:— I owe you many apologies for sending my subscription so late 
in the year; but having in the past months been shipwrecked and earthquaked in 
Jamaica, perhaps I may be excused. It was a delightful surprise on my return 
home to find the numbers of the Muse awaiting perusal, the Founders' Day number 
being especially welcome. And let me here say a word for the Alumna? number of 
last year. I could not possibly tell you how I enjoyed it. Time after time I have 



The St. Mart's Muse. 19 



■ meant to thank the Editors, but have invariably yielded to the charms of the maga- 
! zine, and re-read it from cover to cover instead of writing. Miss McVea's article 
might have been a description of our own school-days ten years later; and from that 
time backward every word was a joy. 

With a thousand thanks to the contributors and warm congratulations to every 
girl who had a hand in editing the magazine, 

Cordially yours, j ESSIE DegeNj >94 _ 

The Editors are especially grateful for this letter from Miss Degen. 
Readers of The Muse will remember her very interesting reminiscences 
of her school-days published in the April Alumnae Muse. 

WILLIAMS-BAEDEN. 

Pattie Barden, of Edenton, at St. Mary's in 1904-'05, was married in 
the Methodist Church at Edenton, on the 21st, to Mr. Joe Williams, of 
that town. We extend congratulations. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHUTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBER IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



Scholarship Examination. 



THE OOBBIN-FERRALL GO, 



Dry Goods 

OE ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES FINE SHOES &W SLIPPBRS 



...Send to... 

ALFRED WILLIAMS I GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



Competitive examinations for the SMEDES and the MURCHISON SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS in St. Mary's School will be held in those parishes of the Carolinas in which 
there are candidates during the first week in May of this year, and the successful 
candidates will enter upon their school work in September. 

Candidates for these Scholarships must be at least fourteen years of age and 
ready to enter the Freshman Class at St. Mary's. The Smedes Scholarship is open 
to any qualified candidate residing in either of the Carolinas; the holder of the 
Murchison Scholarship must be a resident of the Diocese of East Carolina. 

Full information, with detailed requirements, and application blanks, will be fur- 
nished on request. 

These Scholarships cover all expenses, and are good for four years to the holder 
who complies with the requirements. 






OF ADD KINDS 



SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplies. 
Office supplies. 



Advertise men ts . 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W. C. STMACH'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYETTEVILLE STEEET 



KING-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



HE WAS SUPPLIED. 

Tommy sat way back in the church with his mamma. It was his first experience. 
Everything was wonderful to him. By and by the collection was taken, but imagine 
the surprise of To mm y's mother when the usher passed the plate, to hear Tommy say: 

"No, thank you. I've got some money of my own!" — American Home Monthly. 



THE BOYLAN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, SF. C. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

OROCBRS 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SILVEB.THORN CO., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 



JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



SURE WAS. 

"By the way, where did you first meet your wife ?" 

"At her college the day she graduated." 

"Ah! I see. Her commencement was your finish."- 



-Brooklyn Eagle. 



HINES BROS. LUMBER CO., 

KlNSTON, N. C, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Capacity, 60,000 feet per day. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Prvate Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N.C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 . 

Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



ROBT. SIMPSON, 



ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIRT OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET, 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



OUGHT TO BE HONGUE. 

There was a young fellow named Young, 
Who once when his nerves were unstrung, 

Put his wife's ma, unseen, 

In a chopping machine, 
Then canned her and labeled her "Tongue." 

— American Home Monthly. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 

Schools. 

FULL INFORMATION FREE. 



BARRETT & THOMPSON-Architects 

Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 

Author of 

"Colonial Southern Homes." 

115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

"PENNl^UTUALLJFETNSURANCE CO." 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIG H, N. C. "^ 

GRIMES & VASg; 
Fire Insurance and Investments. 
Raleigh, N. C 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 



RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK 
E^!^ 1 $ 15 >°°° Surplus $25,000. Deposits over 
X),000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

m ^ ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 
Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RA.LEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

„,„„ Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 



POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, N". C. 

Capital, 8225,000. Surplus and Profits, $115,000. 

Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier . 

J. B. Tikberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fireand Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C — 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 



ARTISTIC FURNITURE. 
We make a specialty of odd pieces in 
Antique and Modeen Designs. 
Call and see us. 

ROTALL & BOEDEN FURNITURE Co , 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., 
Raleigh, N C. 



HICKS' DRUG STORE 
For Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 

11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 

"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 



PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 



WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best cf everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, 
Surplus, ■ 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100,000.00 

100,000.00 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy — China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 
Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St, 



: 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, l906-'07. 



FEBRUARY-MARCH. 



February 22, Friday— Washington's Birthday. Half-holiday. Special exercises 
at 2:30 p. m. 

February 27, Wednesday— Centennial Anniversary of Longfellow. Special exer- 
cises at 7 p. m. 

March 24, Sunday — Palm Sunday. Bishop's visitation at 11:00. 
March 28, Thursday — Last Quarter begins. 
March 29, Friday— Good Friday. Holy day. 
March 31 — Easter Sunday. 

SPECIAL LEXTEN SERVICES. 

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 5:30. 
Holy Communion — Thursdays at 7 : 00. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-West. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth and Atlanta 
Birmingham Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains "compose™ of Vestibule C 
mPnt < io n S ' a P t U i] man ^ raw ], n ^ Ro ^ rn Seeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars Direct oon 7 - 
W 2ii 8 w ^ emphl ? a ^ d ? ew Oceans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas T Colorado 
llouthern^fnef n POmtS " Interchan S e able Mileage Books good over 1^000 mfles of road on 

C. H. ttATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWARD F. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent Second Vice-President 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



The Student Directory, 1906-'07. 



The St. Mary's Muse Staff. 



ANNUAL. 

(Under direction of Senioi Class.) 

Lillian Farmer, Editor.in-Chief. 

Emily Garrison, Business Manager. 

Louise Hill, "] 

MeTe y n S B P a?i m ' [ L^ary Editors. 

Beatrice Cohen, J 

Sue Prince, ) 

Heber Birdsong, V Art Editors. 

Alice McCullers, ) 



monthly. 
(Under direction of Muse Club.) 



Serena Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 
Elizabeth Waddill. 
Helen Liddell. 
Helen Strange. 



Managing 
Board. 



Lillian Farmer. 
Emily Carrison. 
Mary Spruill. 
Sue Prince. 
Margaret DuBose 



Alice McCullers. 
Georgia Hales. 
Louise Hill. 
Mary Vann. 
Eloise Robinson. 



EPSILON ALPHA PI. 



The Literary Societies. 



SIGMA LAMBDA. 

Lillian Farmer President Sue Prince. 

Elizabeth Waddill Vice-President Sarah Jones. 

Grace Ward Secretary Emily Carrison. 

Eva Rogerson Treasurer Helen Liddell. 

Saliie H. Battle Corresponding Secretary Serena Bailey. 

Louise Hill Critic Helen Strange. 

Frankie Self Historian Alice Corbett. 

Annie Wells ) Triors fKatherine Henderson 

Paula Hazard J ieue ™ I Eloise Robinson. 

The Auxiliary Chapters. 
General Directress Miss McKimmon. 

ST. CATHERINE'S. ST. ELIZABETH'S. 



Miss Thomas, Directress. 
Louise Hill, President. 
Marguerite Lecron, Treasurer. 
Emily Carrison, Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S. 

Miss Cribbs, Directress. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, President. 
Mabel Willis, Vice-President. 
Matilda Haughton, Treasurer. 
Bettie Sturgeon, Secretary. 

ST. MONICA'S. 

Miss McKimmon, Directress. 
Elizabeth Waddill, President. 
Janie DuBose, Vice-President. 
Lyman Grimsley, Treasurer. 
Lee Brown, Secretary. 



Mrs. Vincent, Directress 

Susan Bynum, President. 

Alice Munnerlyn, Secretary-Treasurer. 



ST. ANNE'S. 

Miss Sutton, Directress. 
Eva Rogerson, President 
Blanche Robinson, Vice-President. 
Mary Vann, Treasurer. 
Minnie Leary, Secretary. 

ST. ETHELDREDA'S 

Miss Spann, Directress. 

Sarah Jones, President. 

Katharine Henderson, Vice-President. 

Grace Ward, Treasurer. 

Marguerite Short. Secretary. 



Location Central fw the Carolinas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. M ary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. Q. 

(for girls and young women). 



65th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1906. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 24, 1907. 



1. THE COLLEGE, 

St. Mary's \ *: THE MUSIC ^HOOL. 

offers instruction in these \ S ' ^HE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
Departments : J ^ THE ART SCH q q L 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1906-07 are enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Miller, Knabe and Stein way Grand Pianos. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight 
to the Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. S., B. D. 

RECTOR. 



:*w* 







d 






W J ' ■ 11111 



JH 



JF 



HUH 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



EASTER NUMBER. 



Vol. XL April, 1907. No. 9. 



Easter Lilies. 



HELEN KATHARINE LIDDELL. 



Ah! welcome, lilies white, to us you bring 
The sweetest message that has e'er been told, 

For of the greatest hope of man you sing, 
The greatest joy of earth you now unfold. 

You tell of One more pure than your pure selves, 
Your message is more fragrant than your breath, 

For light of heaven within the world now dwells 
In Him who overcomes the darkest death. 

And we who hear your song, oh ! lilies fair, 
Are filled with rapture, for we hear you say: 

The grave is vanquished, death has lost its snare, 
For Christ is risen again this Easter day. 



The Tail of an Easter Chicken. 



MARGARET ROSALIE DUBOSE. 



As father Rooster always said, ma was a speciheii of the higher edu- 
cation of women, and that came near being' the death of this poor chick. 
When she was quite young she went to a grand University called Incu- 
bator, and she has spent the rest of her life forcing us to live up to the 
many ideas she caught there (and to judge from their number, she 
must have spent all her time catching them). Our first day of life 
(there were only thirteen of us) was made miserable because she said 
at her "dear old Alma 'Bator, chickens were fed on the most hygienic- 
nutritious-albuminous food stuff, mixed in a tin platter," and we 
should begin life properly. After scratching in the sand for a "tin 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



platter," father admitted that he had never seen nor heard of one, and 
didn't believe such things grew in our part of the country, so he brought 
us some delicious fat earth-worms, which -filled the bill" in every way. 
Soon after that, ma said she believed in woman's rights and why 
shouldn't hens crow as well as roosters anyway? She tried it once 
right out in the public Barnyard Square, and old Uncle Rastus threw a 
rock at her and swore he wouldn't have "no hens atryin' to ac' lak roos- 
ters 'roun him, no sah-ree-bob" ! That awful threat quieted her until 
the next day, when she decided that it was time for us to begin to study 
botany and Garden Classics. We were all studiously examining the 
roots of the new planted green-peas when Uncle Rastus came in sight. 
"Har she be, sah ! de most perniciest and high-f alutinest hen, what ever 
I seed! You kin hab her, sah, fo' yo' Easter doins, and de unlucky 
thirteen chicks fo' mos' nothin' " ! Then followed an awful time, the 
bare mention of which causes tears to stream from my eyes. Not to 
dwell on the harrowing story, we were all dumped into a wagon and 
taken to the front of a store. The window we were in was covered with., 
horribly clean sand, and though you could see into the street there wag 
an awful thing that bumped your head when you tried to get out that 
way. Soon a horrible man came in with a big basin. He grabbed me 
and was just about to plunge me in, when I gave a desperate ' squeak, 
kick and wriggle combined, reached the floor and escaped by the open- 
ing at which lie came in. Free at last! But thoughts of Ma and the 
others led me back in front of that fatal window, and what do you 

think I saw there ! 

In place of the twelve fluffy little yellow brothers and sisters I had 
left behind me, were as many brilliant, green, blue and red balls, with 
beady eyes —and "Diamond," the baby of the family, was blue on one 
side and red on the other. Mother must have thought she was "back at 
her beloved Incubator, for she was giving the chicks our old familiar 
lesson of walking gently, by putting the toes down first, and counting 
ten between each step. All of a sudden my eyes caught this horrible 
sign, and the meaning flashed over me, "Diamond Dyes"! What! 
"Diamond," our pet! the brightest of us all, to die! And before she 
was a week old ! My only hope lay in finding father Rooster, so I ran 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



like mad down the street. I had an awful fright once when I came 
to an open field where some boys were playing ball, and one called out, 
"Foul"! Now I knew he meant me, (for mother used to call father a 
"fowl" when she was very mad with him) ; but I ran all tile faster. At 
last I found a nest right up on a porch, but it looked so home-like that 
I just had to crawl into it. Then for the first time I chanced to smooth 
my beloved tail, and, to my horror, I found it was a bright red ! Just 
like "Diamond" ! Perhaps Diamond will die from that awful bright 
color, and then I would too. So thinking, I sobbed myself to sleep. 

I thought I had died and entered the chickens' paradise, when the 
next morning the softest little hand touched me and the sweetest little 
voice said, "0 ! Muvver, Santa Glaus has brought me a truly live Easter 
chicken, with a very Easter tail. Can't I keep it always ?" 



Mieclo. 

SEEENA COBIA BAILEY. 



(Concluded from the March number.) 
That night Mieclo paid no attention to the little brown-eyed girl that 
sat at a table near the restaurant piano. Sometimes, just to amuse him- 
self, he had played his pieces to her, but to-night, intensely excited, he 
felt himself above all the habitues of the restaurant. The motley crowd 
of men and women had no attraction for him except that he felt they 
must be stirred by his music. His own personal good was lost in the 
burning desire to arouse these people, to make them feel somewhat as 
he felt. 

As he stood by the piano and tuned his violin, women paused in their 
conversation to look at him, or to make admiring remarks about him. 
Many of them had often seen and heard him before and were enthusi- 
astic at his appearing that night. His pale, haggard face, the lustrous 
beauty of his dark eyes, the whole proud bearing of the boy attracted 
every one. He looked at the audience as if he were confident of his 
power over them; to-night he was determined that they must feel it 
more than ever. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



For the first piece, he chose a Polish folk-song, simple in its theme, 
yet strangely beautiful and weird in its development It was one that 
he had often played to Aeva. Again he was back in her home; she 
was sitting where the fading sunlight illumined her face or brightened 
her hair with its last rays. He was walking up and down, playing as 
he could to no one else. Oh, the happiness and pain of that picture ! 
When this piece was finished, he saw that it had stirred the hearts of 
some of his audience to whom, like himself, it was familiar. 

The next piece he selected was "The Legende," by Wieniawski. As 
he played, he noticed that some of the women were wiping tears from 
their eyes and even the men seemed moved, for from the soul of the 
boy and the soul of the violin came the weird, yet exquisitely beautiful 
music with its heart-breaking sadness. When it was through he scarcely 
dared trust himself to speak to the man at the piano, for his heart was 
too full of the pathos of the music. 

Somehow he could not think of a piece that would exactly express 
his emotions now ; for awhile he tried to recall one, but nothing seemed 
to fit his mood. All at once a melody sung itself in his mind. He 
turned to the pianist, saying, "I shall not need the piano now ; I shall 
play this next piece — an improvision — alone." The theme was that 
of a love song, tender and passionate. It told of the days when he and 
Aeva had walked hand in hand in the woods or had sat in her twilight 
room. It told of his love and his longing for her ; but through all there 
ran a note of sorrow, profoimd, heart-rending sorrow. When he had 
drawn his bow on the last faint note, he did not glance at the faces; 
around him ; all through the piece he had known what an effect it was 
producing. 

Quickly, yet tenderly, laying the violin in its case, he slipped it 
under his arm and started leaving the hall. Now he could go to 
Aeva's mother! How his arm ached, though! Holy Virgin, would 
it ever have any strength again ! The pain was almost unbearable, but 
then, what was pain if he had helped Aeva ? More than ever he felt 
that his arm was incurably afTected, but he would see the doctor agnin 
and perhaps 

He turned, for Henryk had struggled through the crowd of people 






The St. Maet's Muse. 



and was coming toward him. "Mieclo." He looked into the boy's eyes 
and said nothing more. Mieclo read the unbounded admiration, yes 
worship even, in the elder man's eyes, yet there was pity and sorrow, 
too, in them. 

"Henryk, be happy, for I am happier now, even though my heart is 
aching yet, I have helped Aeva's mother and father ! Those people 
gave their money, but it was I— I that made them !" 

"Boy, they simply idolize you— you are a genius. Oh soul of my 
soul, my Mieclo! God has given you much, and yet your arm"— 

"Go on, why do you cry, Henryk ? What have you to tell me that 
you cannot say?" 

"Aeva's mother has told me— Oh Mieclo, Mieclo, Aeva is ill ! The 

letter came to-night." 

"Ill ! God ! You mean she is dead ! Let me go, let me go !" 
Loosing- himself from the old man's feeble grasp, the boy, his face 

white and haggard, his violin hugged tight in his arms, rushed into the 

darkness of the night. 

The Answer. 



RTTTH VERNON NEWBOLD. 



My head was bowed in sorrow; 

My heart seemed dead with care, 
Ah! — never a to-morrow. 

For all was darkness there. 

The shadows were around me, 
Dark shadows caused by whom? 

My gloomy heart that none might see, 
Was silent as the tomb. 

I cried for help on that dark day, 

Alone and long I cried; 
Oh, send me just one happy ray 

Of sunshine — now denied. 

Like dew on violets falling, 

A message most divine; 
An answer to my calling — 

Pierced hand that helped, 'twaa Thine. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Quarrel. 



NELL E. WILSON. 



It all began with the fort we were making in the sand. When the i 
wave came np and got my feet all wet 1 told Harry he ought to have 
taken me by the waist and pulled me away in time. When he asked me 
why, and told me that he thought I could take care of myself, I was 
furious and told him that he ought to know that that was the way all 
suitors did with their sweethearts. I had seen my sister's suitor pull 
her away from a wave just that way only yesterday, and they were 
grown-ups and always did what was right, Then he lay down on the 
sand and said, "Oh well, it was too much trouble"! Now, nobody 
could blame me for slapping him then, and I did. Even though I am 
only seven I will have my suitors polite and that's the only way to 
make them so. But, oh, I never thought he would get right up and 
leave me, and I heard him say as he went off, "I've just been wanting 
to find a chance to go and see the girl at the candy store. She'll give 
me some candy and she's got rosy cheeks." 

Now that girl is twenty if she's a day, but her cheeks are mighty 
pretty and rosy. He hasn't been near me now for two whole weeks, 
and if it wasn't for the candy girl I'm sure he would have been. She's 
pretty but she isn't very interesting, "not having had an education," as 
father says. We've often had fights like this before, but they have 
never lasted so long. What can be the reason ! He can't be two weeks 
for such a little thing. But maybe it's the candy and not her. 

I simply don't know what to do. I must be in what brother calls a 
pickle. I wonder if I will ever get out of it, I really think she is 
never going to let me go for a minute. I must be the only man that 
ever paid any attention to her because she seems so stuck-up about it 
and is so keen about keeping me. Since the day I went to her and 
told her that I was really quite stuck on her and wouldn't she like to eat 
some of her candy with me, she has never let me go. In the daytime 
she talks to me and gives me candy all the time so that I really couldn't 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



get up and walk off, and in the evening I always feel so queer that I 
can't go over to Ethel's. (I don't know why I should feel funny at 
night; I never used to.) And I want to go over and make up with 
Ethel so much. I know she's furious with me, because I have never 
stayed away from her so long before. And the beastly part is that 
Bobby Jones goes with her every day now. I'd like to show that kid 
what I think of him. 



It's all right now, only Harry has to pay for all the candy he 
gets. He told me this morning why he had stayed away so long and 
how he had gotten away from that girl at last, He said that yester- 
day while she was talking to him a man came into the store and leaned 
over the counter and began to talk to her. She seemed to like it some- 
how, and then she asked the man to come behind the counter and sit 
down. He came and she told Harry to give the man his rocking-chair. 
Then Harry got mad, and just as the man started to sit down he pulled 
the chair away and of course the man sat on the floor. I think it was 
very bright, but of course Harry had to run, because the man was big 
and was saying some bad words in a long string. Harry peeked through 
the window later on and she was by herself, and when she saw Harry 
she made a face at him, so of course she won't give him any more 
candy, and he can't go back. I don't see why she should be mad when 
Harry only played a trick on the man and not on her at all. But I'm 
mighty glad she is. 

I knocked Bob Jones down to-day and he promised not to bother 
Ethel again, so it's all right, and Ethel and I have decided to marry 
when we're grown up. 



Spring. 



HELEN BALL. 



Have you ever stopped and wondered, 

On a sunny April day, 
At the beauty of the landscape, 

In its fresh and bright array? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



At the gold that's in the sunshine, 
At the skies so soft and blue? 

With nature in her splendor, 
And her flowers of varied hue. 

And tell me did you ever see., 

On such an April day, 
The apple trees all pink and green, 

Which gentle breezes sway? 

And have you heard the songs of birds, 
As they welcome back the spring? 

The little brook as it runs along 
With its joyous babbling? 

Then surely you must love the spring, 
For the charms it offers you; 

So then be thankful for the days, 
Which the joys of life renew. 



Moliere. 



[Translated from the French and adapted by E. A. P.) 



A French savant said one day, "When we get to heaven, we ordi- 
nary people will be just inside. On a platform above us we'll see 
Kacine, Corneille, Milton, Homer, Goethe, and far above these will be 
another platform on which will stand Shakespeare and Moliere. They 
are the two great geniuses." Guizot says that Moliere is superior to 
Shakespeare in originality, abundance and penetration of character and 
complete knowledge of human nature. La Fontaine wrote: 

It is a work by Moliere — 
This writer of a style so rare, 
Is nowadays the court's delight. 
His fame so rapid in its flight, 
Beyond the bounds of Rome must be — 
Amen! For he's the man for me. 

Who is this Moliere ? His real name is Jean Baptiste Poquelin, and 
he was born in Paris, January 15, 1622. He took the name of Moliere, 
because he loved his father too much to disgrace his honorable name 



The St. Mak* s Muse. 



when he went upon the stage. Moliere's father was upholstery groom 
of the chamber to the king, and his grandfather had held the same posi- 
tion under Henry IV. 

The sole ambition of a father at that time was to have his son follow 
his trade or his profession, and Moliere's father desired nothing better 
for his son than to have him serve his king as groom of the chamber. 
Fortunately for the world young Moliere was left much with his grand- 
father, who used to take the boy with him to the theatre. The lad was 
a keen observer and his remarks about the plays and the actors were 
full of good sense, finesse and wit. The old man was charmed with 
the observations of his grandson, who was then about fourteen and could 
barely read and write. They both thought that the boy might perhaps 
become something better than tapissier royal, and that to do great things 
one must know more than merely to read and write. They had to 
struggle some time against the prejudices of the father, but finally he 
yielded and Moliere was sent to the college of the Jesuits, where he 
remained five years and learned all they could teach. 

After he had finished his studies he joined himself secretly to a comic 
troupe in Paris, but they did not succeed. Moliere persuaded them to 
leave Paris and try their talent in the provinces. For thirteen years 
Moliere led a nomadic life. This wandering from place to place was 
good for him. He saw all sorts of men in all conditions. He was him- 
self a prey to all the miseries and all the tribulations of life, and he 
gained a wonderful knowledge of the human heart. His six great 
masterpieces — Les Precieuses Ridicules, Le Misanthrope, Le Lartuffe, 
Le Bourgeoise Gentilhomme, Les Femmes Savantes, and L'Avare — show 
his knowledge of human nature in almost every line. 

In 1658 Moliere and his troupe returned to Paris and obtained the 
protection of the Duke of Orleans, who presented him to his brother, the 
young king. Soon after this the king had him installed in the theatre 
of the Petit Bourbon and later in the theatre of the Palais Royal, which 
had been built by Richelieu. 

From this time the success of the great comedian was complete. The 
king loved him for his great talents and Moliere became the soul of 
all the fetes when Louis rested from the labors of royalty. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Moliere had a very elevated idea of his art. He thought that comedy 
should not only amuse men but correct them. Emboldened by his suc- 
cess and by the protection of the all-powerful monarch, he dared to 
attack the vices and the ridiculous fashions and manners of the great 
world and even of the court itself. His high conception of the stage 
gave him the courage to write the Misanthrope and the Tartuffe. In 
the first of these pieces he criticizes mercilessly the people of the world 
who lie to each other and who lavish upon persons to whom they are 
indifferent or even whom they hate the marks of real friendship. In 
the Tartuffe he attacks religious hypocrisy. He has been accused of 
attacking religion itself in Tartuffe; but a letter to the king, asking 
permission to have this play performed, justifies him completely. 
Tartuffe is a masterpiece of shrewdness, force, and fearless and deep 
wrath, and every blow strikes at hypocrisy. 

A contemporary writes : "Moliere had a bad voice, a disagreeable hic- 
cough and harsh inflexions. He was, nevertheless, a comedian from 
head to foot; he seemed to have several voices, everything about him 
spoke, and by a caper, by a smile, by a wink of the eye and a shake of 
the head, he conveyed more than the greatest speaker could have done 
by talking an hour." 

Just before his death, when he was very feeble, his friends and even 
the actors themselves, begged him not to play. "What would you have 
me do ?", he replied, "there are fifty poor workmen who have but their 
day's pay to live upon : what will they do if we have no play ? I should 
reproach myself with having neglected to give them bread for one single 
day if I could help it." This little incident shows his character. He 
was kind, gentle, generous, and ever striving to uplift humanity. 

Moliere did not belong to the French Academy; his profession had 
shut the doors against him. It was nearly a hundred years after his 
death that the Academy raised to him a bust, beneath which was en- 
graved : 

"His glory lacks naught, ours did lack him." 

Moliere did much to honor his time and his country, and he will 
always hold an important place in the history of France, to whose glory 
he contributed so much. La Fontaine wrote: 



The St. Mary's Muse. h 



Beneath this stone Plautus and Terence lie, 

Though lieth here but Moliere alone: 

Their three-fold gifts of mind made up but one 

That witched all France with noble comedy. 

Now they are gone, and little hope have I 

That we again shall look upon the three: 

Dead men methinks, while countless years roll by, 

Terentius, Plautus, Moliere, will be. 



How Nag's Head Won its Name. 



IDA ROGERSON. 



One black, stormy night, on a low, flat sand-bar opposite Roanoke 
Island, an old nag trotted slowly back and forth. The light from the 
lantern which hung around her neck bobbed up and down, casting flick- 
ering gleams out over the sea. Neither the booming of the breakers in 
the old nag's ears nor the waves washing up under her feet disturbed 
her. It was evident that she was very well trained. 

Far out on the ocean a captain was nervously pacing the deck of his 
ship. A storm had been brewing all the afternoon, and for safety the 
captain wished to get in nearer shore. But there another danger 
awaited him, the sand-bars, a source of trouble for every sailor. 

As the captain glanced anxiously toward shore, he saw a light, as of 
another ship, bobbing up and down. "Surely," thought he, "if that 
ship has reached harbor safely mine can." So the prow of the ship 
was turned— but to its fate. It had traveled only a short distance, 
when suddenly a low, scraping grind was heard. The ship gave a 
groan, as if the hole knocked in her side hurt her. Notwithstanding 
the cries for help, the vessel slowly settled to her fate. With a sicken- 
ing rush the water closed over its victims and all was gone. 

The old nag's work was done, for one night at least. 
^ So the legend runs; telling how night after night a band of pirates, 
living on this sandy shore, tied a lantern around an old nag's neck to 
lure the trading vessels in on the sand-bars that they might' secure the 
booty. 

Thus, Nag's Head, the famous summer resort for Edenton and Eliza- 
beth City people, won its name. 
3 



12 The St. Mart's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 



Georgia Stanton Hales, '09, Editor. 



The Longfellow Centenary. 

An Intersociety Meeting was held in the parlor, on the evening of the 
twenty-seventh of February, to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of 
Longfellow's birth. The meeting was presided over by Sue Prince, 
President of the Sigma Lambda Literary Society. With her were 
seated Lillian Farmer, the Epsilon Alpha Pi President, and May Hoke, 
the Alpha Kho President, 

The pragramme was as follows: 

,, Margaret Williams 

Music & 

The Longfellow Centenary Ma T Vann 

Life of Longfellow Matilda Haughton 

Heading "From My Arm-chair" P*d» Hazard 

"Works of Longfellow having special connection with Incidents in his life," 

Ellen Duvall. 

Lon-fellow's Position Among English Poets Marguerite Thompson 

^ °. Miss DuBose 

Reading . . . 

Washington's Birthday Exercises. 

At two o'clock on Friday, February 22, the anniversary of Washing- 
ton's birth, the school gathered in the parlor to do honor to the memory 
of the father of our country. 

The exercises, under the auspices of the Joint Literary Societies, 
although simple, were yet suitable to the occasion and were intended 
to manifest the love and admiration which we all feel for this great 
and noble man. 

The program was as follows : 

Opening Chorus— "Washington's Birthday Ever Honored." 
"Anecdotes of his Life." 

Reading-«Taste for Dancing" Besde ..A£J 

Reading-" Personal Courage" Carlle . w <* v " 

Reading— "Washington at Prayer" . Anniewens 

,. ,._ ,. „ Helen Strange 

Reading — "Receptions 

Song by the School— "Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean. 

Reading-"The Twenty-second of February" -Emily Garrison 

,. «T, -J. u» Phyllis Hickson 

Reading— "Epitaph • J 

Closing Chorus— "The Star-spangled Banner." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



Lillian Farmer, President of Epsilon Alpha Pi, presided over the 
meeting, and with her sat Sue Prince, President of Sigma Lambda, 
and May Hoke, President of Alpha Rho. p. H. 

Student Recital. 

The second Friday Evening Recital was held on March 1. Again 
the girls acquitted themselves very creditably and did justice to their 
talents and to their teachers. 

The program was as follows: 

a. Skating T ^, . 

, t „ S T „ Klein 

b. Album Leaf T ,. , 

Kirchner 

Mildred Holding. 

AioPtiaise 

Massenet 

Alexina Hardy. 

Nocturne ,, __ , 

Meyer-Helmund 

Louise Hill. 

Ondine T , 

Jackson 

Blanche King. 

Gavotte ^, . 

Klein 

Rebecca Shields. 

Spi ' in e S ° n S Merkel 

Lee Brown. 
Berceuse from Joselyn p , , 

Miss DuBose. 

Album Leaf No. Ill „ . 

Grieg 

Frankie Self. 

Chorus and Dance of the Elves. r» r> ■ 

Dur3oi9 

Georgia Hales. 

Valse Lente T ^ 

Krogman 

Mary Alexander. 

Valse Caprice T 

1 Lack 

Jennie Simpson. 

Besides these Friday Evening Recitals there have been nine Thurs- 
day Afternoon Recitals at different times during the year, and these 
the Director purposes to continue to have weekly. 

On March 15 the Third Friday Evening Recital was held. Every 
one enjoyed it very much, especially the violin solo by little Susanna 
Busbee. We hope to have the pleasure of hearing her again soon. 

The program was as follows : 

PiggiCati Delibe, 

j Lyman Grimsley. 



l4 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Valse Mystique Wachs 

Alice Corbett. 

At Play on the Meadow Foerster 

Mary Gaither. 

Four-Leaf Clover Coombes 

Alexina Hardy. 

Petit© Serenade • Steel 

Louise Hill. 

Song Without Words Scni11 

Susanna Busbee. 

Love Song Nevin 

Mary V. Bonner. 

Alpine Rose Gavett Smith 

Josephine Gilmer. 

(a) Arognaise Massenet 

(6) Etude Smlth 

Margaret Williams. 

(a) Barcarole ; Ehr.lich 

( b ) Sehmetterling Grie S 

Maude Eberhardt. 



In Lighter Vein. 



Miss Thomas (in D English). — "Miss G — , what was Goldsmith's 
next novel ?" 

M. G. (after a few minutes hesitation).— "Well, his next novel was a 

play, I think." 



g. B. — "The two articles of dress which I admire most are pretty 
hats and pretty shoes." 

K. PI. — "Well, you are rather extreme in your taste." 



Mr. S. (in History B). — And in the war between Rome and Car- 
thage the Americans won." 



H. L. — "Katharine, take that rubber off that bottle; it will cor- 
rode it." 

K. TT. — "What doe? that mean, TTelra ?" 

IT. L. — "It means to blacken." 

X. TT. — "Well, when T polish my shoes do T corrode them ?" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



B. W. — "Doesn't she play well ?" 
H. L. — "Yes, and I like the construction of that piece especially." 
Of course she meant interpretation. 



Girl (in Senior English). — "All of Shylock's goods were counter- 
feited." 

(Let us explain that she meant confiscated.) 



Things ! Hate in Junior English. 



I hate alliterations, 

I loathe repetitions; 

I do not care for tropes, 

For I really have no hopes 

Of ever learning things like these. 

When I think of the meter, 

I always say "Great Peter!" 

At thoughts of the drama, 

I always long for mamma. 

And as for the ballad, 

I'd as soon eat salad. 



M. K. H. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the 
Muse Club. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 

Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Serena C. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 

Georgia S. Hales, Elizabeth Waddill. Helen Strange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Sallie Haywood Battle. 

Beatrice B. Cohen and Jessie Page Harris, Business Managers. 



EDITORIAL. 



Easter. 



Easter has come again, bringing with it the beautiful message of love 
and resurrection. The enchanting loveliness of spring again inspires 
us with wonder and joy; winter, the dormant season, is past, and the 
awakening has come once more. May the awakening in our hearts par- 
take of some of the beauty of this most blessed time ! 



A Gymnasium — When ? 



All of us are much interested in the progress of the auditorium, 
which is now nearing completion. It will not be long, we hope, before 
it is ready for use — and that suggests the Commencement exercises! 
It is very gratifying to all lovers of St Mary's to know that another 
building has been added to the school equipment, and one that will 
increase the dignified and attractive appearance of the old school. 

Although one wish has been granted us, we cannot but feel the neces- 
sity for something else — a gymnasium. Every person interested in 
physical culture realizes that we need a properly equipped gymnasium. 
We hope that it will not be long before this desire, like that for an 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



auditorium, will be fulfilled, for any stimulus to the rather latent in- 
terest in athletics would be encouraging and very welcome. 



Tennis. 



Speaking of athletics, isn't it too bad that we haven't more tennis 
courts? Now that spring is here and our thoughts are turning more 
towards tennis, we feel the need of additional courts. Little or noth- 
ing seems to have been done about having others laid out. 

Let us see that the girls' enthusiasm is great enough to make more 
courts not a dream, but a realitv. 



With the Exchanges. 



No one feature of school life should be more effective in bringing the 
students of the various schools to a feeling of kinship and nearness, in 
helping to define the relations between the preparatory or high school, 
the college and the university, than the student publications, if freely 
exchanged between the different institutions and freely read by the 
students of each. These same periodicals, turned over on arrival to an 
interested exchange editor for friendly review, hastily glanced over 
by him, and cast aside after they have been used as the theme for his 
page or two of criticism, their style and contents reaching the student- 
body not directly, but only through the medium of the exchange-editor's 
criticism, become of comparatively little importance. 

The Muse has never made a feature of an exchange department, 
chiefly because, being intended primarily as a newspaper, its interests 
are more closely confined than are those of the college periodicals 
which have their separate newspapers and accordingly devote all the 
energies of their magazines to literary development. The Editors 
nevertheless greatly appreciate the exchanges which from month to 
month reach the Muse and try to profit by their contents, and more, to 
bring them as an educative factor before the students of St. Mary's. 
They are not generally read as much as we believe they should be, but 
we venture to say that to those who do make a practice of reading them 



18 The St. Maby's Mttsb. 



month, after , mouth the attractive appearance and dignified contents of 
the representative magazines do more to establish their schools in the 
good opinion of the students reading them than any amount of enthu- 
siastic talk on the part of the students of our fellow institutions, or 
even any amount of college catalogues or other information sent out by 
the school authorities. 

"Converse," and "Hollins," and "College for Women" may be for 
us only attractive names if we have never been students in any of them, 
but we will have a more definite opinion of each of them and a good 
opinion if we are in the habit of reading The Concept or the Hollins' 
Quarterly or The Palmetto. And high as the writer's opinion has 
always been of Randolph-Macon Woman's College, it has been dis- 
tinctly improved this session by the opportunity to examine The Tattler, 
a magazine distinctly up to the standard of its institution. And who 
could fail to be impressed with the spirit which gave rise to the Mclver 
Memorial Number of the State Normal Magazine and the Lee Centen- 
ary Number of the Wake Forest Student, both reflecting much credit on 
their editors and the schools which develop the editors, and both special 
numbers of magazines, the regular numbers of which can be relied 
upon to be good. And the U. N. C. Magazine dropping in month by 
month, quietly dressed and staid and dignified in content, but not 
without its dash of humor, is the representative university gentleman. 
Examples' along the same line could be multiplied but without strength- 
ening the point. And it is because we so thoroughly believe in the 
usefulness of the school publication, large or small, from "prep, school" 
or from university, if it is edited up to the best of its ideals and possi- 
bilities, that we are especially glad to welcome the Acorn of the Bap- 
tist University for Women, which we believe will do credit to an insti- 
tution of which its students may well be proud. 

Yet it would be unwise to leave the subject without a little glimpse 
at the darker side of the picture, though we would that there was no 
darker side. If the great majority of the school publications do their 
institutions credit and raise them and their students in the esteem of 
their fellows, there are unfortunately still some that have the opposite 
effect, and nothing is less questionable than that such periodicals are 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



better dead than struggling. In some cases it may be almost entirely 
the fault of the printer, but in others the Editors are clearly in fault. 
And if we have not the means or the facilities to get out a publication 
with good paper, with clear printing and an attractive cover, and to 
avoid gross errors in the body or style of the publication, in this day 
when one publication must inevitably be contrasted with others that 
possess these good points, we believe that the editors will do their publi- 
cation, their school and themselves the greatest kindness by allowing 
the paper to die. May none go to its death for these reasons. 

SCHOOL NOTES. 



GEORGIA STANTON HALES, '09. EDITOR. 



— Quite a. number of St. Mary's girls enjoyed hearing Mr. South- 
wick give "Herod" at the Baptist University on February 25. Mr. 
Southwick gave ''Julius Cassar" last year, and it was hard to decide 
which was most enjoyable. 

— The Civic Improvement Lecture at the Metropolitan on February 
26 was attended by a large party of St. Mary's girls, and when it was 
given again at A. & M. on March 2, the attendance was just as large. 

— The Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society having chosen the subject 
for their Inter-Society Debate, Sigma Lambda has decided to uphold 
the negative. The debaters on both sides are now hard at work. The 
query is : ''Resolved, That the Higher Education of women makes hap- 
pier homes." 

— The introduction of electric lights in the Grove during the past 
month has been hailed with delight by all those who have been oppressed 
by the olden darkness. Old St. Mary's girls would hardly know them- 
selves as they walk from the summer-house up the well-lighted avenue. 
The lights are placed at intervals from the summer-house to the Main 
Building, on the porch and in the halls of the Main Building, at the 
entrance to the various buildings, and in the Music Rooms and Chapel, 
and add very decidedly to the school-equipment. 

— The vacancy in the faculty, caused by the death of Miss Spurlock, 
has been filled by the election of Miss Eliza Brown, of Raleigh. The 






20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



reputation of Miss Brown as a student had not died out of student con- 
versation and it is indeed pleasant for us as students to find her now 
as acceptable as a teacher, as the faculty found her in her school-days as 
a pupil. Miss Brown was graduated from St. Mary's as valedictorian 
of the Class of 1904, of cherished memory, and went from St. Mary's 
to Trinity College, Durham, where she graduated with credit last May. 
The early part of the present session she substituted very acceptably in 
the Raleigh High School and was teaching in the Raleigh Graded 
School when invited to join our Faculty. She has charge of the Ger- 
man and elementary Science. 

— As usual the taking of the photographs for the Annual was a cause 
of excitement for days, but they are finished now ; the "groups" and the 
"clubs" and the "hits" are all in, and the Editors promise us a better 
Year Book than St. Mary's has yet produced. As we were reasonably 
well-pleased with the last annual we wait with interest for the promised 
improvements. The Book will be ready for distribution about May 
20. It will again be from the presses of Edw y ards & Broughton. 

— The Riding Parties have become quite "the thing." There are not 
so many that indulge, but there is always a goodly assemblage to witness 
the start, which occupies anywhere from one to three hours ( ! ) after 
lunch on Mondays. Mrs. Irvine chaperones the party and the riders 
include Nell Wilson, Lottie and Daisy Sherrill, Helen Strange, Mar- 
guerite Short, Emily Campbell, Elizabeth Sturgeon, Sydney Gabbett, 
Rosa Heath, Jessie Jennings, Emily Carrison, Esther Rembert and 
Rainsford DuBose. They all report delightful rides. 

— Mrs. King, Mrs. DuBose's sister, and her daughter, Miss Daisy, 
spent six weeks at the Rectory in February and March, leaving on the 
17th in order to be at Sewanee for the opening. Mrs. King has charge 
of Hoffmann Hall at the University of the South. 

— Lent has been as usual a quiet period with us, and has given the 
opportunity for more concentration in study. The afternoon services 
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, have been well-attended and 
the special Chapter work has been pushed steadily. Each of the Chap- 
ters has had special work in hand, and has been holding extra weekly 



The St. Mart's Muse. 21 



meetings in accomplishing it, with very good results. The course of 
Confirmation Lectures was given by the Rector in the School-room on 
Sunday evenings after roll-call ending on the Fifth Sunday in Lent. 
On Palm Sunday the Bishop made his annual visitation at the eleven 
o'clock service and confirmed Mary Carraway, Daisy Sherrill, Louise 
Moore, Isabel Brogden, Irving Morgan, Cornelia Nixon, Margaret 
Temple, Bessie Arthur, Sydney Gabbett, Elizabeth Sturgeon, Mary 
Gaither, Janie DuBose, May Hoke and Margaret Rayner. 

— We are very glad to welcome Emilie Smith, of Raleigh, to the ranks 
of our home-pupils. Her father, Mr. H. F. Smith, formerly cashier 
of the Carolina Trust Company, has gone into business in New York 
City and moved his family there, leaving her with us. Her aunt, Mrs. 
Harriet Page Weir, of New York, is one of the most constant friends 
of The Muse and of St. Mary's. 



Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 

Vrnr-PRRSTiiFNTs J Mrs - L M - Pittenger, Raleigh, 
vice-presidents, < Mrg F p Tucker Raleigh, 

[Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 

Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, yt. Mary's. 



Will the Alumnae Help ? 



The School has lately issued as the February uumber of the quarterly 
St. Mary's Bulletin sl reprint of Hon. Richard EL Battle's historical 
sketch of St. Mary's from its beginning, to which Mr. Battle, by re- 
quest, has added a supplementary sketch covering the administrations 
of Dr. Bratton and Mr. DuBose. There is a dearth of printed matter 
bearing on the history of St. Mary's, all the articles extant practically 
covering the same general facts without attempting to give any detailed 
picture of the school development or training. Dr. Battle's sketch, 
which consists of an account of the origin of the school and personal 
sketches of the four Rectors, is the fullest account to be had. Copies 
of the Bulletin may be had by writing to the School. 

The re-publication of this address, first delivered by Dr. Battle in 
the Chapel in 1902, as a Founders' Day Address, serves to remind us of 
two things — first, of the importance of bearing in mind the meaning 
of Founders' Day and of attempting to make more of it by greater 
preparations for its celebration along some such lines as those outlined 
in the last Founders' Day Muse, including addresses along historical 
lines by other speakers filled with lasting love for St. Mary's, her past 
and present work ; and, second, the dearth of written historic material 
at present. 

The warning sounded again and again by the North Carolina State 
Historical and Literary Association to Carolinians to preserve the his- 
toric records and documents of every sort now in order that the mate- 
rial may be ready for the historian of later days should ring in our ears. 

The time has not yet come when one of her daughters cares to under- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



take to write a full history of St. Mary's, but it will surely come in the 
future, and unless we of the present make a concerted effort to collect 
and preserve the data on which this history must be based, the history 
when it is written will be not only far from perfect, but will be inaccu- 
rate. Especially must this be true of the earlier days, when in the time 
of Dr. Aldert Smedes, the school being entirely private, no full rec- 
ords were preserved. Only from the memories of the older pupils and 
teachers and by the gathering of the little yearly circulars, advertise- 
ments and reports issued by Dr. Smedes, is it likely that the early 
period of the school can ever be fully reconstructed, and the time is 
quickly passing in which it will be possible to gather these facts. The 
issuing of the "Alumnae Numbers" of the Muse is an attempt to get 
pen-pictures of the past from the view-point of the girls of those days, 
but memory should be reinforced by documentary statements of facts. 
The contributions published in the two Alumnae Numbers thus far 
issued have gone far toward furnishing the beginnings for a complete 
sketch. Dr. Battle's sketch presents another phase of the school his- 
tory from another view-point. There are many others needed before 
anyone will be in a position to write fully and comprehensively of the 
School. 

When the time comes, he or she will have enough to do to consider 
and weigh the data, without having to first attempt its collection. We 
of the Alumnae may not be able to write, but we can each help the 
cause very effectually by searching- out such old papers and mementoes 
of St. Mary's as we may have among our possessions and forwarding 
them, if we do not care especially to have them and want them to be 
where they can do the most good to the Alumnae Editors of the Muse, 
or, if we cannot bring ourselves to part with them, by sending a list of 
what we have so that others may know where they can be consulted in 
time of need. 

The importance of having full data on any given point at hand for 
the proper discussion of any points of interest with reference to St. 
Mary's, and even more to avoid mistakes and misstatements, is well 
illustrated in the February Muse, where, among the School notes, the 
statement is made that "Miss Christine Sanders has the honor of beina; 
the only person that has ever been married in St. Mary's Chapel.'' 



24: The St. Mart's Muse. 



This was such a flagrant error that it should have been noticed at once, 
and special effort is made each month to avoid such errors, but the Edi- 
tors have to depend entirely on the memory of Mrs. Iredell, "Miss 
Katie," Miss Dowd and those others still within reach who are in- 
terested in and acquainted with the past of St. Mary's for criticism of 
such statements when submitted as facts, since there are no records to 
refer to, and in spite of many re-readings, unless several of these "old 
girls" edit the notes errors will creep in. In the instance mentioned, 
it is a well-known fact that there have been numerous marriages in the 
Chapel, including those of Miss LeGal, Miss Sanders and different 
members of the Smedes' family, though none in recent years; perhaps 
some of the latest having been that of Miss Eliza Smedes to Dr. A. W. 
Knox in 1886; that of Miss Sanders, now Mrs. liembert, already re- 
ferred to ; and that of Miss Alice Dugger to Mr. Walter Grimes in 
188—. 

We are rather fearful in making this statement, as it is more than 
liable to be an error, yet it is as nearly accurate as it can be made on the 
authority of those we can consult here. Within the last month, as an 
echo from the past with a gift for the Chalice, has come a reminder 
of the marriage of Miss Hattie Harold to Mr. Alexander Cuningham, 
which was celebrated in the Chapel by Dr. Aldert Smedes in the '70s. 



In the Chapel — The New Chalice. 



The last month has been marked by several decided improvements in 
the adornments of the Chapel, which are a constant pleasure to the 
members of St. Mary's and those others who are able to attend the 
Chapel services, and the knowledge of which will afford pleasure to St. 
Maryites everywhere. 

The electric lights, which have been introduced back of the arch in 
the Chancel and at other advantageous points, add much to the beauty 
of the Chancel at evening services, and these lights include one outside, 
back of the Smedes Memorial Window over the altar, which throws it 
into relief, and displays its beauty at night as well as in the daytime. 

The Rector has had the font placed in the center of the entrance to 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 



the choir, where it has its prominent position, and shows clearly the 
connection between the two sacraments. A full set of colored hang- 
ings have been made for the new altar. 

The Smedes Memorial Altar and the new Bishop's Chair were dedi- 
cated with special prayers at the evening service on the fifth Sunday 
in Lent (March 17th). The Altar, as all well know, is an Alumnae 
Memorial to Drs. Aldert and Bennett Smedes, while the Bishop's 
Chair, the gift of the pupils of St. Mary's through their societies, is an 
expression of their regard for the third Bector, Dr. Theodore DuBose 
Bratton, now Bishop of Mississippi. The Chair is a handsome one of 
oak and harmonizes entirely with the Altar. 

The responses to the Appeal of the Bector for contributions of old 
gold, silver and precious stones, for the making' of a new Chalice through 
the love-gifts of friends of the School, has met with a very gratifying 
response, and many contributions of historic association, as well as 
intrinsic worth, have come to him from the alumnae and pupils. He 
has, however, decided to postpone the making of the Chalice a little 
longer to give other friends an opportunity to contribute their offerings. 
He would like very much to have further contributions of precious 
stones for the adornment of the Chalice, and all contributions sent him 
by April 15, so as to have the Chalice ready for Commencement Sunday. 



Alumnae Notes. 

Word has been received of the safe arrival at Gibraltar of the Horner 
party, who sailed from Xew York for Xaples on February 23. Bishop 
Horner went with the party, which included his mother and sister, Miss 
Mary Horner, Miss Susan Graham, Misses Margaret and Mary Pride 
Jones, Miss Gertrude Winston and Miss Kate Horner. 

It is a great pleasure to have a renewal of their subscription from 
"the Jeudwines" and to know that their interest in St. Mary's and the 
Muse is not abated. Mr. Jeudwine has entirely recovered his health, 
but he and Mrs. Jeudwine are still living quietly in England, where 
they went after his illness. Their address is Mr. and Mrs. J. W. 
Jeudwine. The Grove, Stocklinch, Tlminster, Sommerset, England. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Mossie Long" writes from Hamilton Institute, Washington, that 
she is safely established there with her old friend, "Laura Baker," of 
Brunswick, Ga., for the rest of this session, and that she is having the 
full benefit of Washington. She reports having seen many of the old 
St. Mary's girls, of whom there are such a number in the Washington 
"finishing schools" this season. 

"Rosa Shuford," of Hickory, has been visiting in Raleigh and paid 
us frequent visits. She notes many changes in the two years she has 
been away. She was last here in September, '05, when she brought 
her sister, now "Freshman Mary," to us. 

The election of Col. Chas. £. Johnson to the presidency of the Raleigh 
Banking and Trust Company, in succession to Mr. Chas. H. Belvin, 
who retires from business, is a matter of much interest to friends of 
St. Mary's. Mr. Johnson, so long interested in St. Mary's under the 
Smedes' regime through his father, Dr. Johnson, long the physician 
to the school, and Mrs. Iredell, his sister, has been himself one of the 
trustees from North Carolina since the school was acquired by the 
Church, and has been and is an ever active member of the Executive 
Committee, in which the active direction of St. Mary's affairs is 
vested. As a member of the Building Committee he has taken especial 
interest in the construction of the new Auditorium, now beginning to 
approach completion. 

Mrs. F. S. Spruill, of Louisburg, visited the School in March, the 
special purpose of her visit being to enter her daughter, Martha Bird 
Spruill, for the next session. Though as a loyal alumna of St. Mary's 
she has always taken an active interest in its affairs since her own 
school days, she has not been here so frequently since her daughter Alice 
left school in 1906. It will be pleasant to have her resume her fre- 
quent visits with the advent of "Martha Bird." 

Again this summer a party of St, Mary's teachers are to enjoy the 
advantages of European trips. Miss Fenner and Miss Margaret Du- 
Bose are planning to sail from Baltimore the last of May to spend the 
summer in study in Paris ; Miss Hull and Miss Pixley sail from New 
York the last of June for a year of foreign study, expecting to spend 
most of their time, the one in Vienna, the other in Berlin. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 






Scholarship Examination. 

Competitive examinations for the SMEDES and the MUKCHISOISr 
SCHOLAKSHIPS in St. Mary's School will be held in those parishes 
of the Carolinas in which there are candidates during the first week in 
May of this year, and the successful candidates will enter upon their 
school work in September. 

Candidates for these Scholarships must be at least fourteen years of 
age and ready to enter the Freshman Class at St. Mary's. The Smedes 
Scholarship is open to any qualified candidate residing in either of the 
Carolinas; the holder of the Murchison Scholarship must be a resident 
of the Diocese of East Carolina. 

Full information, with detailed requirements, and application blanks, 
will be furnished on request. 

These Scholarships cover school expenses, and are good for four 
years to the holder who complies with the requirements. 



A Word to Parents. 



Parents often write about their daughters. Some apologize for 
giving trouble, realizing that there are many cares and worries insepa- 
rably connected with the management of the School and are moderate 
in their requests, knowing that their point of view, at the distance from 
which they look, and considering the "special pleaders" through whom 
they get their information and impressions, may not be always accu- 
rate ; while others write as if every trouble of the girl is in some way 
the fault of the School, and have little patience with anything that does 
not quickly conform to their wish and pleasure. Between these two 
types of parents there are endless shades, but we are here to take the 
trouble and to one and all I say — if you were anxious about your daugh- 
ter in any way and did not ask our help, you would be unfair both to 
her and to us. We cannot satisfy everyone, nor control every condi- 
tion, but it is our duty to try, and many things we may not know as 
fully as we ought unless we hear the "home side." Never hesitate, 
therefore, to write or ask any questions that are reasonable, and keep 



28 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



at it until you get as near satisfaction as your cause and human limita- 
tions will allow, but give us credit for knowing conditions here better 
than you. 

The education of a "divine and eternal life," for which we shall, in 
a large measure, be responsible to God, is too serious to treat lightly, 
or to leave undone, however small the detail may be. One of the 
claims that St. Mary's — as a Church school — makes above other schools 
of equal scholastic grade, is that she looks deeper and broader and higher 
than the mere school-drill. She must give teaching as good as the best 
in every detail, but she is here for the developing of character, and the 
education of immortal souls; and with so high an aim no detail is too 
small and trivial not to receive the most earnest and prompt attention. 

McNeely DuBose. 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse; generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



HAVE 



WHARTON & TYREE 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHUTOGRAPHS 

REMEMBEE IT PAYS TO GET THE BEST 



Orders are invited for 

THE ANNUAL MUSE. 

(The Year Book of the Students of St. Mary's.) 

Ready May 20, 1907. 

As good as the Annual of 1906 ; we think, better. 

$2.00 a copy in advance. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



...Send to... 

ALFRED WILLIAMS I GO. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

BOOKS 



OF ALL KINDS 

SELECT LINE OF STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and supplia*. 
Office supplies. 



Advertisements. 



Hart-Ward Hardware Company 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Kelsey Warm 

Air Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



W. C. STRONACH'S SONS CO. 



GROCERS 



216 FAYBTTEVILLB STREET 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



But Not so Many Tongues. 



A miss is as good as a mile," they say, 
But in one way it's not true. 

A mile has more than five thousand feet 
And a miss has only two. 



-Boston Transcript. 



Jungle Vaudeville. 



When a fire goes out, where does it go? 

The monkey asked the ape. 
Can't say," said the ape; "yet many^s the time 

I've seen a fire-escape." 



— Roseleaf. 



THE BOYLftN-PEARGE GO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Fancy Goods, 
Underwear. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTBVILL.E AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



M.ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

WILMINGTON <ft HARGETT STS. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any articlt selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

J. S. MacDONALD CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

214 N. Charles St . Baltimore, Md. 

WE WANT your patronage in everything in 
the Jewelry, Watch and Diamond line. We 
sell only the best goods and at most reason- 
able prices. We make all kinds of college, 
class and fraternity Jewelry. Our new cata- 
logue mailed FREE to any address. 

H. SlLVERTHORN Co., 

917 Main St., Lynchburg, Va. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art. 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try HAYES for 

PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 

Repairing promptly done. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY, 
Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



Trouble Foreseen. 



Robbie — Don't those bluefish go about in schools, mamma? 
Mamma — Yes, Robbie; why? 

Robbie — Nothing; only I was just wondering what the school does if some fisher- 
man happens to catch the teacher. — Atlanta Constitution. 



Politeness Pays. 



'Johnny, can you name a city in Alaska?" 

'Nix." 

'You should be more respectful. Jimmy, can you?" 

'No'm ! " 

'Correct. Nome is a very thriving Alaskan town." 



— Washington Herald. 



HINES BROS LUMBER CO., 

Kinston. N. O, 

Manufacturers of 

Kiln Dried North Carolina Pine 

Lumber. 

Capacity, 60,000 feet per day. 

Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 



Prvate Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S 216 Fsyetteville St. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QTJINN & CO. 

Leading Florists of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations.Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds ' 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 

ROBT SIMPSON, Dmss ?S,i? e lS,S,e«: 



ANTICEPHALALG1NE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 



Advertisements. 



FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing exceeds the 

GAS RANGE 

ALWAYS READY. NO DIET OR ASHES 

FOR LIGHT 

Usethe best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 

124 Fayetteville St. 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 

J. SCHWARTZ, 

RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Tarry Not. 



The road to yesterday — 

Why travel it? 
A tangled skein, so why 

Unravel it? 
The future calls you on, 

The past is dead, 
And all you hope to do 

Lies just ahead. — Birmingham Age-Herald. 



THE SOUTHERN EDUCATIONAL BUREAU, 

RALEIGH, N, C. 

(Established, 1891.) 

Invites correspondence with Teachers and 
Schools. 

PULL INFORMATION FREE. 


THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 


BARRETT & THOMPSON, 


Francis P. Venable, President, 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 


Architects and Engineebs, 
raleigh, n. c. 


E. m. UZZELL & CO., 
PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 
R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 


ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 
RA.LEIGH, N. C. 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 


GRIMES 8c VASS, 

Fire Insurance atid Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C. 


Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 


RALEIGH SAVING8 BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Caeh'r. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus $50,000. Deposits over 
8750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 


POWELL & POWELL, 
COAL AND WOOD, 

1*7 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, ST. C. 

Safety, Courtesy and Accommodation to 

Patrons. 

Chas. E. Johnson, President. 

W. N. Jones Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timbeelake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

ARTISTIC FURNITURE. 
We make a specialty of odd pieces in 
Antique and Modern Designs 
Call and see us. 

Royall <fe Borden Furniture Co , 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., 

Raleigh, N C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 



W. B MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White Hou&e Coefee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 

PESGUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St.. Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteviile St., Raleigh, N. C. 



" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
_ Electric Co ntractors and Engineers. 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



r. R. FERRALL A CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteviile Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
MUTUAL LIFE INSUBANCK.' 



The Citizens National Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, 
Surplus, 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



•f 100,000.00 

lOO.OOO.OO 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 



ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY 
All Sorts of Building Supplies ' 
RALEIGH, N. C. 




Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

Dentist. 

HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 
ALL THONES No 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON A SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 

MISSES REESE A COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, !906-'07. 



While at this writing the exact dates of the April functions have not been deter- 
mined, several of the more important events of the school-life will occur during the 
month : 

Easter week will not be marked by any public entertainment at the school. 

During the second week in April the last of the Muse Club entertainments will be 
given. 

During the third week will occur the Inter-Society Debate on the question, "Re- 
solved, that the Higher Education of Women Makes Happier Homes." Misses 
Farmer and Hill for Epsilon Alpha Pi, Affirmative, and Misses Bailey and Strange, 
Sigma Lambda, Negative. 

During the fourth week the annual play of the Dramatic Club will be rendered. 



S B A BO A R 

AIR LINK RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 

Direct Line to All Points In the South, South-West, North and North-West. 



DOUBLE D^JLY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham Memphis, Chattanooga. Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis,, Savapnah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Carts. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. 

For time-tablea, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South-West, apply 
to Seahoard Passenger Representatives, or address 



C. H. OATTIS, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, 

Raleigh, K. C. 



C. B. RYAN, 
General Passenger Agent 

Portsmouth, Va. 



EDWARD F. COST, 

Second Vice-President 

Portsmouth, 7a. 






The Student Directory, 1906-'07. 



The St. Mary's Muse Staff. 



ANNUAL. 

(Under direction of Senioi Class.) 

Lillian Farmer, Bditor.in-Chief. 

Emily Garrison, Business Manager. 

Louise Hill, ") 

SMST' [literary Editors. 

Beatrice Cohen, J 

Sue Prince, ) 

Heber Birdsong, v Art Editors. 

Alice McCullers, \ 



MONTHLY. 



(Under direction of Muse Club.) 



Serena Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. ~| 

I 



Elizabeth Waddill. 
Helen Liddell. 
Helen Strange. 

Lillian Farmer. 
Emily Carrison. 
Mary Spruill. 
Sue Prince. 
Margaret DuBose 



Managing 
Board. 



J 



EP3ILON ALPHA PI. 



The Literary Societies. 



Alice McCullers. 
Georgia Hales. 
Louise Hill. 
Mary Vann. 
Eloise Robinson. 



SIGMA LAMBDA. 



Lillian Farmer President Sue Prince. 

Elizabeth Waddill Vice-President Sarah Jones. 

Grace Ward Secretary Emily Carrison. 

Eva Rogerson Treasurer Helen Liddell. 

Sallie H. Battle Corresponding Secretary Serena Bailey. 

Louise Hill Critic Helen Strange. 

Frankie Self Historian Alice Corbett. 



Annie Wells 
Paula Hazard 



Tellers fKatherine Henderson 

■< j2 lo j ge Robinson. 



The Auxiliary Chapters. 
General Directress Miss McKimmon. 

ST. CATHERINE'S. ST. ELIZABETH'S. 



Miss Thomas, Directress. 
Louise Hill. President. 
Marguerite Lecron, Treasurer. 
Emily Carrison, Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S. 

Miss Cribbs, Directress. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, President. 
Mabel Willis, Vice-President. 
Matilda Haughton, Treasurer. 
Bettie Sturgeon, Secretary. 

ST. MONICA'S. 

Miss McKimmon, Directress. 
Elizabeth Waddill, President. 
Janie DuBose, Vice-President. 
Lyman Grimsley, Treasurer. 
Lee Brown, Secretary. 



Mrs. Vincent, Directress. 

Susan Bynum, President. 

Alice Munnerlyn, Secretary-Treasurer. 



ST. ANNE'S. 

Miss Sutton, Directress. 
Eva Rogerson, President. 
Blanche Robinson, Vice-President. 
Mary Vann, Treasurer. 
Minnie Leary, Secretary. 

ST. ETHELDREDA'S 

Miss Spann, Directress. 

Sarah Jones, President. 

Katharine Henderson, Vice-President. 

Grace Ward, Treasurer. 

Marguerite Short. Secretary. 



<¥ 



Af 



vyB 




The St. Mary's Muse. 



FINAL NUMBER. 



Vol. XI. May, 1907. No. 10. 



The Commencement Program, 1907. 

Tuesday, May 28 — 

8:15. Elocution Recital. "Midsummer Night's Dream." 
Wednesday, May 29 — 

11:30 a.m. Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 
2:30p.m. Class Reunions (as appointed). 
4:00 p. m. Annual Meeting of the Trustees. 
4 : 30 p. m. Annual Meeting of the Alumnae. 

8:00 p.m. Dedication of the Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Building (the 
Auditorium ) . 
Dedicatory Address, Governor Glenn, of North Carolina. 
Commencement Address, Bishop Nelson, of Georgia. 
Thursday, May 30 — 

11:00 a.m. Consecration of the Chapel. 

Commencement Sermon, Bishop Bratton, of Mississippi. 
5:00 p.m. Commencement Reception. 

Annual Exhibit of the Art Department. 
8 : 30 p. m. Annual Concert. 
Friday, May 31 — 

10:30 a.m. Graduating Exercises. 

Class Exercises, etc., in the Auditorium. 
Final Exercises in the Chapel. 

The 1907 Commencement. 

Once more the Commencement season rolls around, and all else is more 
or less lost sight of in thought and preparation for the final events of 
the school session. Always a season of great interest to all interested in 
the life and development of a school, especially to those to whom as 
Alma Mater the school has been more than school, this Commencement 
at St. Mary's promises to be the most important and its exercises the 
most interesting that the daughters of St. Mary's and their friends have 
enjoyed since the semi-centennial year. 

This Commencement, marking as it does the close of the sixty-fifth 
year of St. Mary's usefulness and the tenth of ownership by the Church, 



The St. Mauy's Muse. 



will "be at the same time the special jubilee celebration of the final pay- 
ment of the debt incurred by the Church in purchasing the property, 
and a promotion meeting of the friends of St. Mary's to give a great 
impulse to work for even greater things in the future. There will be 
several special features. The opening of the Eliza Battle Pittman Me- 
morial, a completely equipped and model Auditorium, marks the com- 
pletion of the most important addition to the school equipment since 
the erection of the Infirmary, and points the way for other Memorial 
buildings which would be of equally great use. The dedication of this 
building will be a feature of the exercises on Wednesday. 

The Chapel, so dear to every St. Maryite, and so familiar to every 
one acquainted with the school, was unconsecrated during the time of 
the Drs. Smedes, because the property being a private one was liable 
to be converted to other uses ; since the ownership of the Church it has 
remained unconsecrated because of the debt. Its consecration after 
all these years will then be the most forcible and pleasant reminder 
of the new and brighter state of things, and in addition to being the 
feature of the Thursday exercises, will mark the climax of the spirit 
of the celebration. But the Class of 1907 will not be overlooked in 
the program of the week. This Commencement is their Commencement 
regardless of what it may be, more or less, to others. With their Class 
Day exercises on Wednesday and the Graduating Exercises, the feature 
of Friday, they will not be forgotten, and the rest of the program will 
only help them to forget the less. 

The Exercises in Detail. 
The Commencement dates have been changed this year, and instead 
of " Commencement Week" beginning with the Sermon on Sunday, &M 
concluding with the Graduating Exercises Thursday morning, the pro- 
gram will extend over only three days, and events will follow each 
other in quick succession. 

TUESDAY. 

The regular duties of the year, the "dear pleasures" of "Examin 
tion Week," will not be over until Tuesday, May 28th. That evenin 
the Commencement will open with the annual "Elocution Evening." 
This year the Department, under the direction of Miss Cribbs, will 
present "Midsummer Night's Dream," a more ambitious attempt than 
anything this young department of St, Mary's has heretofore under- 



[1 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



taken, but one which promises to be both pleasing and successful. This 
will be the first Commencement function in the new Auditorium. 



WEDNESDAY. 



The Class Day Exercises in the Grove, which have been a feature of 
recent Commencements, will be held this year with additions. The 
Senior Class will introduce some features to make the program more 
general and to give the student-body a part in them as well as the 
Class, and these exercises will be the student number of the Commence- 
ment Program. The hour has been placed later than heretofore to 
give everyone the opportunity to be on hand. 

It is hoped that the special events will draw an unusual number of 
the Alumnae back to their Alma Mater, and Wednesday at 2 :30 has been 
put aside for the Class Reunions which may be arranged by the class 
officers. Following these the annual meeting of the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation will be held as usual in the Art Studio, where in addition to 
the election of officers and the arrangement for new work for the 
Association, it is hoped to have a brief address by Bishop Bratton as 
the feature of the meeting. It will require nothing more than the sug- 
gestion of such a pleasure to insure the attendance at this meeting of all 
who are within reach. 

The annual meeting of the Trustees is this year an event of especial 
importance, inasmuch as in addition to laying plans for the coming 
year, important steps are likely to be taken with regard to the future 
policy and development of the school, and a new Rector to succeed Mr. 
DuBose is to be chosen. By the acceptance of Mrs. Sheib of election 
as Lady Principal, an energetic and efficient administration of the 
internal affairs of the school is assured, and all interested in the future 
of St. Mary's now await with great interest the selection of the new 
Rector. The deliberations of the Trustees will begin on Wednesday 
afternoon, and will be continued at adjourned meetings from day to 
day. 

Wednesday evening will come the first of the special features. The 
Eliza Battle Pittman Building will be formally thrown open to the 
public and dedicated to the use for which it was intended in appro- 
priate exercises, the chief speakers announced for the occasion being 
Hon. Robert B. Glenn, Governor of North Carolina, and Rt. Rev. Kin- 
loch Nelson, Bishop of Georgia. Governor Glenn will deliver the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Address of Dedication, and Bishop Nelson will speak on "Christian 
Education." 

THURSDAY. 

On Thursday morning the event of chief interest to the Alumnae 
will take place, in the consecration of the Chapel. There should he a 
notable gathering of the bishops, of the clergy, and of the Alumnae, and 
the service will be one long to be remembered. It will take the place 
of the usual Sunday Commencement Service, and at it Bishop Bratton, 
who has not been at St. Mary's since he came back to deliver the Com- 
mencement Sermon to the Class of 1904, will preach the Commence- 
ment Sermon. 

In the afternoon at five the Commencement Eeception will be held 
in the Main Building. Commencement guests, Trustees, Alumnae and 
students are expected at the Eeception, which will be the social event 
of the Commencement. Concurrently with it the Art Studio will be 
thrown open for the annual exhibit of the Art Department, which again 
promises to be a worthy one. 

Thursday night the Annual Concert, comment on which is superflu- 
ous, will be given, beginning at 8.30 in the Auditorium. 

FRIDAY. 

Friday is graduation Day, and home-going day. The exercises will 
be divided as usual, but this year the Auditorium and not the Parlor 
will be the scene of the graduation addresses and the announcements, 
and after they are over the procession will move as usual to the Chapel 
for the awarding of the diplomas and the final devotional service. 

The class is again small this year, there being only nine graduates, 
as follows: 

Eelen Ball Raleigh, N. C. 

Heber Corinne Birdsong Raleigh, N. C. 

Emily Jordan Carrison Camden, S. C. 

Beatrice Bollmann Cohen Florence, S. C. 

Lillian Hauser Farmer Florence, S. C. 

Louise Hill Lexington, N. C. 

Alice Meddlers McCullers, N. C. 

Sue Brent Prince Wilmington, N. C. 

Mary James Spruill Littleton, N. C. 

The announcement of the Class Honors, the reading of the Honor 
Roll, and the award of the Niles Medal for General Scholarship, will 
as usual be the source of pleasurable uncertainty to the last. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



With the Graduating Exercises, which will conclude about one 
o'clock, the school session will be over. Friday afternoon will be all 
motion and confusion, each outgoing train will bear its quota of home- 
goers, and on Saturday morning St. Mary's girls will be scattered and 
summer silence will reign again in the Grove. 



Isabel. 



HELEN KATHERINE LIDDELL. 



The sweetest name in all the world to me 
Of all the names which song or story tell, 

The music of the breeze and of the sea, 
Are all combined in one name, Isabel. 

The dearest eyes in all the world to me, 
Blue as the skies or violets from the dell, 

And bright as ever sparkling streams can be, 
Are those dear, laughing eyes of Isabel. 

The sweetest maid in all the world to me, 
And naught that bard or poet e'er can tell, 

Of peerless beauty, sweet simplicity, 
Can yet compare with little Isabel. 



Scarlet Saqe. 



SAKAH PRICE THOMAS. 



It was a chilly afternoon in the late fall, and as the fire flickered 
and danced in the open fire-place, it gave an air of comfort and cozi- 
ness to the room. I was standing before the fire with my host, Colonel 
Peyton, and we were both looking at the dancing flames before us. 

On the low mantel stood a large brown jar of scarlet sage, and the 
bright color blended in with the feeling of warmth and comfort indoors. 
I was looking at the flowers and remarking on their beauty, when I 
saw just beside the jar a miniature, a little oval gold frame inclosing 
the portrait of a beautiful girl. She had wavy brown hair, large dark 
eyes, and the most perfect color imaginable. But the expression itself 
was what attracted you, for the face was so sweet and pure, and the 



The St. Mart's Muse. 



eyes so true, that it seemed as if they could look down into your inmost 
soul. 

"What a wonderful face !" I exclaimed. 

"Yes," my old host replied, turning to the picture, "that is my 
sister Elizabeth. She died when she was quite young. We think our 
little Betty is very much like her." 

He turned and stood with his back to the fire, warming his hands in 
the ruddy glow. 

"Our little Betty," he repeated slowly, "you haven't seen her yet? 

His face clouded, and he became silent for a moment. Then with 
a shrug of the shoulders, as if to say, "We had better drop the subject," 
he turned to me : 

"Come," he said, "will you ride this afternoon, or is the weather 
too much for you ?" 

"I think if you will let me," I replied, "I will stay here by the fire. 
I have a very interesting book." 

The book was interesting, but it was almost impossible to keep my 
attention on the story. I had drawn a low, easy chair to the fire, and 
I could not help looking upon the miniature on the mantel. I found 
myself wondering why the Colonel's face clouded when he spoke of his 
sister. 

Above the mantel were crossed the swords with which he had fought 
all through the war, and somehow it seemed to me that they could tell 
me if they chose. I looked down into the fire again, and between the 
burning logs I began to build pictures and stories — all of them about the 
Colonel's sister Elizabeth. 

The pictures grew dimmer and dimmer, and things on the mantel 
above seemed to run into each other indistinctly, and my thoughts 
began to wander, and slowly, . . . slowly, ... It seemed 
the same place, the same fire; yes, for there was the same jar of scarlet 
sage. Before the fire stood a young girl dressed in white. Her brown 
hair was put low on her neck, and waved about her face; her eyes 
were large and dark, and the color in her cheeks seemed to be only the 
reflection of the large bunch of scarlet sage she had at her belt. Yes, 
undoubtedly it was the girl of the miniature herself. 

Beside her, looking down into the fire, stood a young man, tall broad- 
shouldered and manly looking. He wore a blue uniform, with brass 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



buttons. There was a Captain's insignia on his sleeves, and his sword 
hung in its sheath at his side. 

"Well," he said turning to her, "I have to go now, and won't you — 
can't you ever let me come back, even to see you ?" 

It was her turn to look at the fire now, as if in the burning coals she 
could find an answer for him. 

"No," she replied slowly, still gazing into the fire. "No, you must 
never come back, even to see me." 

He picked up his gloves and soldier's cap where they were lying in 
a chair beside him. 

"Won't you give me something to take with me ?" he pleaded ; "some- 
thing to tell me that you will sometimes think of me?" 

She selected a piece of the beautiful red at her belt and handed it 
to him. 

As he looked down at her, she smiled up at him, and with a little 
helpless gesture, gave him both her hands. 

"Go, now," she said, "I must not let you stay any longer." 

As if it was impossible for him to control himself, he took her in his 
arms, and after one long passionate embrace, he let her go, and without 
turning back he walked out of the room. 

She watched the door a moment as if stupefied, then looking down at 
the crushed flowers, she knelt by the chair, and putting her face in her 
arms, she sobbed as if her heart would break. 

I opened my eyes and looked about me. I couldn't have been asleep, 
for there I was in the same place ; and it was all too real to be a 
dream. 

The door opened and a young girl entered. I started, then looked 
closely again. She was dressed in white with a bunch of scarlet sage 
at her belt. She had wavy, brown hair, and large dark eyes. Close be- 
hind her came a young man in blue uniform with brass buttons. 

But at this minute she saw me. "Oh, I beg your pardon for dis- 
turbing you," she said brightly. "You must be uncle's guest, I am 
Betty, and this is Lieutenant Murray." 

I looked at the radiant faces, which told plainly of their great hap- 
piness. Then I glanced up at the mantel-piece. Was it possible that 
the brown vase could be laughing ? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS. 

Georgia Stanton Hales, '09, Editor. 

April 4th— Student Recital. 

The usual Recital was held Thursday, April 4th, and was enjoyed 
very much. Since Easter the Evening Recitals have been held on 
Thursday instead of Friday, as the weekly choir practice is now on 
Friday evening. 

The program for the evening was as follows : 

Volkleid ( Earribourg 

Helen Quinerly. 

Salut d' Armour -. Elgar 

Jennie Kyle. 

To a Water Lily MacDowell 

Alice Stokes. 

( a ) Scarf Dance Chaminade 

( b ) Romanza Berwold 

Blanche King. 

Andante from Opus 14, No. 2 Beethoven 

Maggie Pennington. 

Capriccietto Tan Wilm 

Mary Gaither. 

(a) Nocturne Gurlitt 

( b ) Scherzo Kullak 

Henrietta Schwartz. 

Shepherds All and Maidens Fair Nevin 

Ruth Newbold. 

April 13th — "The Country Fair." 
On Saturday evening, April 13th, St. Elizabeth's and St. Ethel- 
dreda's Chapters held a "Country Fair," which was thoroughly enjoyed, 
and was also quite successful. Helen Strange and Sue Prince "kept 
door," and gave every one who came in a little ticket, which she was 
told to take to the "Sandwich Booth." Here Jane Stillman and Flor- 
ence Beckwith served sandwiches and cocoa. At one end of the room 
Grace Ward could be heard telling everybody to come to see the "Great 
Swimming Match." Bessie Arthur had charge of this, and it was also 
a success. You had hardly had a chance to see it, however, when you 
were taken to interview one of the "Fortune Tellers" — Helen Liddell 
and Ellen Duvall. The former was a palmist, and could tell you very 



The St. Mar* s Muse. 9 



wonderful things. The latter made use of cards, but she, too, could 
tell you what you thought no one knew but yourself. Eight next to 
the "Fortune-telling Booth" Rosa Heath stood at the door of "Freak 
of the Circus.' Within there was Esther Eembert — but you never 
would have known her. In one corner "Lady Bountiful' s Booth" was 
presided over by Lela Jemison and Georgia Hales. Annie Wells was 
in the "Candy Booth," which was very popular. Irving Morgan and 
Mary Gwynn had charge of the "Post-office," where there was a letter 
for everybody. At the Express Office Ruth Newbold, Allie Stokes, 
Mary Bingham and Theresa King had charge. To everybody to whom 
they gave a package they also gave a number, and to the one holding 
the lucky number was given a box of candy. Allene Gentry — "Number 
9" — was the lucky one. Delicious ice cream and candy were sold at 
the "fair," and altogether it was a very pleasant occasion for every one. 

April 24th— The Inter-Society Debate. 

As I seated myself on one of the back seats assigned to visitors in 
St. Mary's parlor on the evening of the twenty-fourth of April, I was 
struck with the scene before me. The girls in their many-colored 
dresses excitedly talking, in front of them the stage prettily decorated 
with greens and hung with the colors of the societies — old rose and 
sage, and purple and gray — and behind them the rows of interested 
boys in sober black. Some of the excitement which pervaded the room 
seized me, too, though I did not know who the debaters were, nor 
what the question might be, neither was I particularly intent on the 
victory of either Sigma Lambda or Epsilon Alpha Pi. 

Suddenly a hush fell over the assembly, as first two black-robed 
girls in solemn dignity ascended the platform, and after them the 
debaters. I have always wondered how young girls felt when they 
first appeared in public. I had always fondly imagined that they would 
be excited and timid, but these young ladies shattered my illusions, for 
they seated themselves calmly and looked about them with perfect 
self possession. 

The exercises opened with the singing of the school song, "Alma 
Mater," by the members of both societies and the visitors, after which 
the president of Sigma Lambda, Miss Prince, presented the question: 
"Resolved, That the Higher Education of Women Makes Happier 
Homes," and told us the names of the debaters: Miss Lilian Hauser 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Farmer and Miss Louise Hill, E.A.n., for the affirmative, and Miss 
Serena C. Bailey and Miss Helen Strange, 2. A., for the negative. 
Then the debate began, and as each girl arose in a hushed stillness, and 
sat down aniid loud applause, the excitement increased. Every one 
agreed that the papers were splendid, and after they had all been read 
no one could imagine who had won. Then came the retorts, and my ad- 
miration for the self-possession and abilities of the debaters rose still 
higher, for it was remarkable how easily and to the point they spoke. 
The retort of Miss Strange was especially witty and clever. 

The judges, Miss Fannie Heck, President of the Woman's Club of 
the city; Mr. J. Y. Joyner, State Superintendent of Education, and 
Mr. H. A. Morson, Principal of the Raleigh High School, then retired, 
and while they consulted we were entertained by an excellently played 
piano solo, by Miss Frankie Self. When the judges returned, and 
Miss Heck, having been introduced by Mr. Joyner, ascended the plat- 
form to tell us the longed-for decision, the excitement was intense. But 
at last, after a few moments of suspense, it was told: "After much 
consideration, we have decided in favor of the negative." The room 
was immediately pandemonium let loose, and I hastily made my way 
to the door and through the grove with the cries of the Sigma Lambdas 
ringing in my ears. 

April 26th— The Chamber Concert. 
Miss Chelian Pixley, Pianiste; 

Miss Charlotte Kendall Hull, Violiniste; 

Dr. Geo. Summey, Jr., Cellist. 
PROGRAM. 

Trio in G Major, No. 1 t Haydn 

Andante, Adazio, Rondo all' Ongarese. 

Larghetto, from Second Symphony Beethoven 

Minuet, Symphony in E Flat Major Mozart 

Liebesgarten, Op. 34, No. 1 Schumann 

Romance, Op. 12 Van Goens 

Asa's Death, Peer Gynt Suite Grieg 

Anitra's Dance, 

Of the concert the Raleigh papers say : 

The concert of Chamber Music given at St. Mary's Friday evening, April 26th, 
was well attended and by many of Raleigh's music lovers. 

The program was made up of the old classical school — Haydn, Mozart and Bee- 
thoven being the composers chosen; and the modern romantic school, Schumann, 
Van Goens and Grieg. For contrast and charm the program could hardly have been 
better selected. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 11 



The Haydn Trio was one of those many pieces for strings he composed for Count 
Esterhazy's orchestra, for which he was the eapelmeister for over thirty years, and 
where he had such an exceptional opportunity for hearing his works performed by 
master musicians before they appeared in published form. The Andante is almost 
an inexhaustible flow of melody, with each instrument having its share, making a 
beautiful example of polophony. The Adagio is dreamy, delicious and satisfying. 
The last movement is the famous Rondo, usually styled the Gypsy Rondo. Haydn 
was in his jolliest mood in this. The piano part, as played by Miss Pixley, made 
the eyes of school girls open wide, for they have worked laboriously over these gay 
measures as a piano solo. 

Although written before Beethoven was entirely himself, wholly free from the 
imitation of Haydn and Mozart (if one may say Beethoven ever imitated anyone), 
this Larghetto from the second Symphony is one of the loveliest slow movements 
ever written. It was written in his first period before total deafness came upon him 
and before the profound melancholy, so often found in his later works, reached hia 
music. 

The minuet from Mozart's second Symphony was placed after Beethoven for the 
sake of contrast. It sounded thin, perhaps., after the rich harmony of the Lar- 
ghetto, but nevertheless is a charming and dainty bit of writing in this dance form. 
It is a part of one of Mozart's three greatest symphonies. 

As a whole this half of the program was given a beautiful rendition; sympathetic, 
good ensemble thoroughly musical phrasing throughout. 

The Schumann "Liebesgarten" was written for two parts, for the violin and cello, 
with the piano having the harmony in chords, greatly in contrast to the previous 
works in this respect, especially. The whole spirit of these latter pieces is different. 
In these there is an evident attempt to speak of life more vividly. The Liebesgarten 
breathes sadness from first to last, but in no way was typically Schumann, perhaps, 
though extremely beautiful. 

The "Romance" of Van Goens was seemingly one of a tragic nature, full of sweet 
longing rising as to some dreadful catastrophe,, but ending peacefully. 

The last number was a part of Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite, the parts chosen being 
Asa's Death and Amitra's Dance. The music of the former is almost too painfully 
sad. The Dance endeavored to dispel the gloom and closed the evening with a dash 
and sparkle that was a relief. 

Throughout the entire program the playing of the artists showed ripe musician- 
ship, but the latter half made it possible for Miss Hull to give free reign to her 
special qualities, warmth of tone and "temperamental playing," which we all admire 
so ardently. To speak of Miss Hull's and Miss Pixley's playing is like "carrying 
coals to Newcastle;" but one can not refrain from making one more compliment 
as a parting "good wisher" for the success of their year abroad, and to wish them 
a safe return to St. Mary's to continue their high class of work they have always 
stood for in Raleigh. 

Dr. Summey played the parts for the cello very satisfactorily, and by the way, 
his learning to play the cello made it possible for this trio concert to be given, for 
which he has the thanks of the very appreciative audience. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Aprii 27th— The /V'iuse Play. 

The last appearance of the Muse Club on April 27th was very suc- 
cessful in every way. The entertainment was cleverly planned and 
well carried out, and was amusing from beginning to end. The pro- 
gramme began with a pantomine of the old song a Willikens and Dinah," 
which kept the audience laughing from the start. Katharine Hender- 
son, the stern father who treated his lovely daughter, Louise Hill, and 
her true lover, Eosa Heath, so harshly, met a well merited fate at the 
end, and the dance of the ghosts in the last scene, when the moral of 
the tale was pointed out, was very awe-inspiring. During the acting 
Josephine Gilmer sang the verses of the song very sweetly, and both 
she and the actors deserve much praise for the success of the perform- 
ance. 

The second part of the programme was the short play, "A West 
Point Regulation," and in this, too, the actors distinguished them- 
selves. Marguerite Thompson was very winning and lovable as "Mar- 
jorie," and Jessie Harris as "Lieutenant Masters," made a most at- 
tractive suitor. Nell Wilson, too, as the young cadet Richard Miles 
Harrison, acted her part splendidly. The entertainment was managed 
by Jessie Harris, and to her the chief credit for its success is due. 

E. T. W. 



Eventide. 



See the snows of many winters 

On his aged head now lie, 
And his eye hath lost its brightness, 

And the thoughts come slowly by. 

And his steps are very feeble, 
And his head is bent with care, 

And his tone is oft impatient 
Of the youth he can not share. 

Stop and think, you who are smiling 
In the light of youth and love, 

How he needs you in his sadness ; 
Stretch a hand as from above. 

Far behind him marks the pathway — 
Wrecked his hopes and all that's dear; 

Bright before you lie3 your pathway 
With those hopes to give you cheer. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

Speak the kindest words you think of, 

Do the kindest deeds you will, 
Help him o'er the last steep climbing 

Of the rocks on life's rough hill. 

For his feet are very tender, 

Worn the rugged pathway through, 
And the joy and hope you bring him 

Will some day come back to you. 

Oh, too oft we leave the flowers 

All to wreathe round death's dark bier; 
Let us haste and give them, darling, 

While his life is lingering here. M. E. S. 



in Lighter Ve.in. 



Not as in Fiction — A Dime Novel by "Yip" and "Zip." 

As the ship steamed past the statue of liberty, Page looked back for 
one parting glance at the familiar buildings crowded against the hori- 
zon. It was with a sigh of relief that as they slowly disappeared, he 
lighted his cigar and grimly paced the upper deck. Page was not what 
one would call a handsome man, but certainly the marks of a strong 
character revealed themselves in every feature. The steel gray eyes, 
the firm mouth, and the face now lined with care, portrayed strength 
combined with disappointment and grief. A stranger watching this 
man stride back and forth might wonder what had caused those lines 
to appear on a face so young ; but to one who had spent the past week in 
the hot, bustling city of New York, the story would be only too well 
known. "Failure of Gordon Page & Co." had headed the columns of 
the chief newspapers for the past few days, and it had been generally 
rumored that the junior member of the firm had been the chief cause 
of trouble — in what way no one yet knew. Doubtless to-morrow's inter- 
ested readers would see in these same journals the startling news of 
young Page's sudden departure for Europe. Would they say that he 
was leaving to escape notoriety? 

At first, in the bustle of departure, the solitary figure was not noticed, 
but such an unusual face could not long be overlooked even in a crowd, 
and now he had attracted the particular attention of a a maiden 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



lady. She stood directing the deck steward about the placing of her 
steamer chair, and the wind had blown the many little black stringy 
curls about her forehead and across her sharp, decided face. But her 
eyes now lit up with pleasurable excitement and unmistakable interest 
as Page turned and walked past her. The deck steward stolidly put her 
chair on the windiest corner, but he was not noticed, for the lady's eyes 
were fixed on the broad back of the slightly bowed head of the stranger. 
But he, for his part, took no notice of the lady who showed such interest, 
and after a prolonged walk he disappeared through the doorway. 

Later, at dinner, as he seated himself at the long table, he was aware 
of a slight confusion beside him, and on turning saw an erect, deter- 
mined maiden lady planting herself firmly beside him. Heavens! 
What pleasant prospects for the next week ; something told him that talk 
to him she would, and answer her he must. He was just planning to 
move his seat when the captain, leaning toward him, said : "Mr. Page 
you and Miss Kirls must know each other. I'm sure you will have 
much in common, as you both are from New York." 

This was the signal for a stream of conversation from the lady, which 
lasted the best part of that meal, and he realized would long continue. 
But the one redeeming feature of the incident was that the captain 
had also introduced him to the golden-haired, brown-eyed girl who was 
sitting beside Miss Kirls, and who later proved to be her niece. She had 
attracted Page from the moment she entered the room, laughing gaily, 
and now since he had met her, he realized that if he could only cultivate 
her acquaintance, he might forget his misfortunes and distress. 

He found that this hope was not to prove a disappointment, for he 
grasped every opportunity for being with her, and certainly those 
hours spent together, those moonlight walks, might have ended then and 
there in something serious for both of them. But alas, two things in- 
terfered to disturb his happiness. The first, needless to say, was the de- 
termined pursuit of himself by Miss Kirls, and the second was the pas- 
sionate devotion and jealousy of a young and handsome boy who had 
come to the steamer with the ladies, and who seemed to have made him- 
self their self-appointed guardian. The first day he had not appeared, 
but the second he was very much in evidence, and Page, though he had 
from the beginning instinctively liked the frank, straight-forward young 
fellow, inwardly swore at his luck as he, ensconsed in the corner with 
Miss Kirls, watched the two on the second afternoon, laughing happily as 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 

they paced the deck. But Page was not one to give up easily, especially 
in a case like this, and at night it was his turn to have the undivided 
attention of the girl, while young West watched them moodily from the 
same seat that Page had occupied in the morning. 

And so it went on for the first four days of the trip, Page becoming 
more and more infatuated each day and West more and more jealous, 
until each realized that it would be best to have a complete under- 
standing between them. That night, meeting in the smoking-room, 
Page drew the younger man aside and frankly talked over the state 
of affairs with him, till each finally knew how the other felt toward 
the girl. At last West said, "See here, Page, I tell you what we will 
have to do. There's no help for it. We'll have to fight for her, each in 
his own way, the best man wins." The old time love of fighting for his 
lady thrilled Page, and he determined that win her he would, or die in 
the attempt. 

That night as he lay in his berth the absurdity of it all overpowered 
him — that he, a confirmed bachelor, interested in nothing but the ups 
and downs of Wall Street, should have fallen desperately in love in 
two days, and now should be determined to fight or die for the lady 
like a sentimental boy. But the storm that was raging around the 
ship, the great waves dashing against her sides, made him feel as if 
it was all unreal, and that such things as love and rivalry were the 
only possible and real things in this life on the great, mysterious, 
angry ocean. With these thoughts he fell asleep. 

He was awakened by a terrible crash, and the piercing shriek of a 
woman, and throwing on some clothes he rushed into the corridor, only 
to find black darkness enveloping him, and terrified figures rushing past. 
With difficulty he freed himself from the struggling crowd and slipped 
out on the deck. There he could see nothing, but sheets of water dashed 
against his face and in his ears was the sound of a vague grinding and 
creaking mingled with the shrieks from the hall behind him. Dazed 
and alarmed, he turned back, with only one thought — to find the girl 
and protect her against whatever might happen. 

As he entered he was aware that the tumult had died, and that a 
man's strong voice was speaking out of the darkness. It was the 
second officer, and he told the cowering, panic-stricken people, shortly 
and sternly, that in the storm the ship had struck a rock ; that they were 
in great danger, and that the only way they could save themselves was 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



to quickly, and as calmly as possible, put on the life preservers and 
reach the boats that had already been lowered. After this only the 
women's voices broke out again, while the men, recovering their pres- 
ence of mind, set to work doing what the officer had advised. 

Page listened intently in the darkness to hear her voice, and at last 
he heard, quite near him, her sweet though frantic cry: "Oh, what 
shall we do, aunty," and in answer, "Oh, I'm here, just trust in me," in 
West's boyish tones. Turning quickly, Page seized the trembling lit- 
tle figure in his arms, determined even in that desperate moment that 
he would save her, and no one else. Hurrying out on the windy, storm- 
swept deck, he fought his way to the rail, while the figure he held 
clung still closer to him, and he felt the great ship settling deeper and 
deeper in the trough of the mountainous waves. How he lifted her 
over the side into the little rocking boat ; how he followed her at last, 
he never knew ; but after endless hours on the great dark ocean, every 
moment fearing that the tiny boat would overturn, every energy spent 
in bailing desperately, at last they saw a gray streak in the sky and 
knew, with thankfulness in their hearts, that dawn was near. 

Then, for the first time, Page turned and looked anxiously at the 
woman he had saved, crouched in the stern of the boat. And then he 
saw — horror of horrors, that the girl was not there, only the cowering, 

desolate figure of "Aunty !" The four sailors seeing the look 

of blank dismay on his face, wondered what had come over him. Page 
threw back his head and gazed with unseeing eyes at the tossing ocean 
for one moment of agony, but then as the woman moved and stared up 
at him with a faint smile, he realized that she was a woman in distress, 
and that he must sink his own disappointment in the common trouble. 
And he was slightly comforted at the thought that the girl was not 
drowned, for there had been time to save every one, and he remembered 
with a bitter laugh — West had been there to protect her. 

He started from his revery, for the sound of breakers was in his ears, 
and the sailors were shouting and pointing apprehensively at the low 
line of white which had suddenly appeared on the horizon. When they 
reached it, only too soon, and the great, towering breakers dashed the 
little boat to pieces, he was ready to swim with the speechless woman 
for the low beach ahead. It was a hard struggle, but at last they 
reached it and staggered up on the hard, dry beach, and from sheer ex- 
haustion, sank down on the sand. Miss Kirls was still speechless, but 



The St. Maey's Muse. 17 

after the sailors had gone off in search of food and water from the 
little houses which could barely be seen from the shore, she turned and 
looked at him with her old coy glance. 

And Page, smiling in sheer desperation, thought "Hardly as fiction 
would have it." 

As to the trouble in the firm in ISTew York ; as to the fortunes of West 
and the girl, these things are shrouded in mystery, and we leave them to 
our readers to guess. 



The Fate of My Musical Genius. 



One time in my life I felt proud, 
(Though I never would tell it aloud), 

For I thought I'd the power 

To please by the hour, 
With mandolin, any sized crowd. 

One day lots of visitors came 

To my room, and they, knowing my fame, 

A tune begged from me. 

After many a plea 
I played, so they've themselves to blame. 

A piece, very mournful, I'd play, 
I played with such feeling that they 

Were so overcome 

They got really glum. 
I make them feel music, I'd say. 

They didn't exactly encore, 

But sighed, so I thought, "They want more.' 

Numerous waltzes I played, 

Many a sweet serenade, 
Till I saw some one make for the door. 

I didn't know just what she meant, 
So asked. She said word had been sent 

That obliged her to go, 

But she hated to, so, 
That she really was sad— but she went. 

I continued with tune after tune 

Till the girls began moving; and soon, 

For some reason they know, 

They all had to go, 
Leaving me with my music to croon. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



They all left me, I didn't know why; 

With deep thought there came, bye and bye, 

The mournful conclusion 

My powers were illusion. 
If I ever play more, let me die. S. B. P. 



When Mary Smiles. 



Sweet Mary's eyes are like the summer sky, 

And like the yellow gold is Mary's hair, ■ 
And all the world is gay when Mary's nigh 

And I am free from sorrow and from care. 

For though the night be dark, the way be long 

And naught is clear before me for a while, 
I still continue in my merry song, 

For darkest night is day in Mary's smile. 

Though rough my way appears, to me 'tis smooth, 
Though gold I lack, I scorn all earthly wiles, 

With lightest heart and freest step I move, 
For what need I of gold when Mary smiles. 

Helen Katharine Liddell. 



ary s in use. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh 
N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the 
Muse CJub. 

Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 

Serena C. Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 

Georgia S. Hales, Elizabeth Waddill. Helen Strange. 

Helen K. Liddell. Sallie Haywood Battle. 

Beatrice B. Cohen and Jessie Page Harris, Business Managers. 



EDITORIAL. 



May ! Can it be possible that the last month of school has really come ? 
For some of us it means the end of the school year, the parting from 
friends, but also the beginning of another long-anticipated and delight- 
ful vacation; while for others of us this Commencement is the end of 
school, the beginning of life in the real world. Some of this latter 
class are eager for the social pleasures, and others are looking forward 
to serious work ; but whatever the future life and work of the girls, the 
influence of St. Mary's will always make itself evident in that life and 
work. jSTo matter how much the gaiety or how varied the duties, that 
will occupy our time, there will often come the thought of the old times 
spent here. 



And now girls, knowing that you will always take an interest in St. 
Mary's, may we make just one suggestion to you? The present man- 
aging board of the Monthly Muse, like the boards of other years, has 
realized the difficulty of keeping in touch with the alumnae of even the 
last few decades. It seems almost impossible to get much news of the 
old girls — and how interesting such news would be to many of the 
subscribers ! So in the future perhaps some of us can let the Muse 
have a few items now and then. We can assure you of their being 
gladly received. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



This number of the Muse is of course the last to be issued by the 
present managers. Our readers will pardon us, perhaps, if we apologize 
a little for the publication this year. For although the members of the 
Muse Club are to be commended for their support of the managers, it 
has often been hard to get material — "material" is the cry of most 
school monthlies, it seems. It is pity that there is such a dearth of it. 
Of course the lack of it is partly caused by the modesty — shall we call 
it — of some really capable pupils, who sometimes in saying that they 
cannot write, underrate their ability. We hope, however, that next 
year there will be less trouble in obtaining material, and we wish the 
new staff a very successful publication. 



Lady Principal at St. Mary's. 



Mrs. Edward E. Sheib is Secured to Occupy the Position. 



[From the News and Observer of April 24th.] 

The Board of Trustees of St. Mary's School are to be congratulated 
on having secured the services of a Lady Principal, who on the testi- 
mony of those who know her personally and by her work, is admirably 
suited to the position. 

Mrs. Edward E. Sheib was Miss Lenora Walmsley, of an old and 
honored Louisiana family, and she was reared in the Episcopal Church. 

Before her marriage Mrs. Sheib taught in the Louisiana State Nor- 
mal School, an institution which owes its thorough organization to Dr. 
Edward E. Sheib, of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and later of 
the Chair of Philosophy in Tulane University, Louisiana. As his 
wife, Mrs. Sheib, kept in close touch with his work, aiding it much 
by her keen insight and gentle sympathy. After her husband's death 
Mrs. Sheib went to Columbia University, 1ST. Y., and for three years 
did such earnest work in Teachers College that she won not only the 
degree of B. S., for which she entered, but the high testimonials to 
her personal worth and scholastic attainments which recommended her 
to the Bishop of North Carolina and the Board of Trustees of St. 
Mary's School. 

There are desirable personal and social qualifications which may 
not be set forth by diploma or degree — though Mrs. Sheib has both of 
these — but which are most important elements in the power and useful- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



ness of one to whom is entrusted the care and training of young women 
for the duties of life. Dr. Alderman, President of the University of 
Virginia, who knew Mrs. Sheib while at Tulane, says of her in a letter 
to the Board of Trustees of St. Mary's School : ''Mrs. Sheib is a lovable 
woman, of personal charm, of good breeding, of sincere devotion to her 
work, and has had the best of modern training. I believe you could 
not do a wiser thing than to secure Mrs. Sheib for St. Mary's." 

Mrs. Sheib has recently been a guest of Bishop Cheshire, and she 
made a most pleasing impression upon all who met her. Since that 
visit she has lost her mother, but it is hoped that she will again be at 
"Ravenscroft" for the Commencement at St. Mary's. 



SCHOOL NOTES. 



Georgia Stanton Hales, '09, Editor. 



Mary Wiggins and Margaret Temple have returned from a short 
visit to Chapel Hill, where they went to attend the Easter German. 

"Our New Minister," which was played Friday evening, April 5th, 
at the Academy of Music, was enjoyed very much by a large number of 
the girls, who were chaperoned by Miss Pool. 

The friends of Eena and Isabel Clark were delighted to see them for 
a short while during the month. 

Blanche Robinson is back at school again from a short stay at home, 
where she was called by the illness of her sister, who is now much 
better. 

We are glad to have Annie Wood with us again. Because of ill 
health she was at home during the third quarter. 

We are also very glad to number Maude Eberhardt among the house 
pupils. Her grandfather, Dr. Marshall, who has resigned his parish of 
Christ Church, is away now for his health, and so she will be with us 
for the rest of the year. 

All the girls that went home Easter are back, and now everyone is 
looking forward to Commencement. Among the fortunate ones were 
Sallie Haywood Battle, Alice Corbett, Helen Gwyn, Marguerite Short, 
Mary Shuford, Sue Prince, Julia Rosser, Lee Brown, Nannie Camp- 
bell, Hallie Carrison, Genevieve Cooper, Corinne Gregory, Rosa Heath, 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Jessie Jennings, Marie Koiner, Helen Liddell, Mary Tankard, Annie 
and Mary Wells, and Georgia Hales. Sarah Jones went to visit friends 
in Durham; Lyman Grimsley went to Columbia with Annie Wells 
to attend the Kappa Delta Fraternity Convention, and Hazel Middle- 
ton went to Kittrell to see Kate Blacknall. 

The Rector's family has been quite fortunate this month in having 
with them Mrs. DuBose's nephew, Mr. MacRae. 

Minnie Burgwyn, '04, an old St. Mary's graduate, has also been 
visiting at the Rectory, and her many friends were glad to see her 
again. 

Since Easter one of our greatest pleasures has been the ball games 
between the different colleges, and although we cannot see all of them, 
we are always interested in the results. 

Mary Wiggins and Reba Clark enjoyed a short visit from their 
brothers during the month. 

Marguerite Brown went home on the 20th of April for the marriage 

of her sister, Fay. 

The election of officers for the session of 1907-'08 in Sigma Lambda 
was held on the evening of May 8, and was the object of as much interest 
and enthusiasm as usual. The election resulted in the choice of the fol- 
lowing officers : Marguerite Thompson, President ; Sadie Thomas, Vice- 
President; Katharine Henderson, Secretary; Lula Taliaferro, Corre- 
sponding Secretary; Isabel Hanna, Treasurer; Nell Wilson, Critic; 
Meta Boykin, Historian ; and Margaret Williams and Sydney Gabbitt, 
Tellers. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Eknest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Vice-Presidents, J Mrs. 1 M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
' ] Mrs. F. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
(.Mrs.Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's 



Announcement of the Annual Meeting. 



The Annual Meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnae Association will be held in the 
Art Building, May 29th (Wednesday) at 4.30 p. m. It is hoped that Rt. Rev. T. 
D. Bratton, Bishop of Mississippi, will be present and address the meeting. 

For the President, KATE McKIMMON, Secretary. 



At the last annual meeting of the Alumnae at St. Mary's, May, 1906, 
it was decided that the Chapel and its needs should be the first object 
of the Association and its funds. 

Since that time the lighting has been completed, three windows and 
the Bishop's Chair have been given, and other memorials are under 
consideration. It has been suggested that the object for this year's 
Alumnae work should be a window inscribed : 

"For all Thy Saints at Rest. Alleluia !" 

It is hoped that there will be a full meeting for the discussion of this 
question, that if it meets with general approval, the plan may be carried 
out by the ensuing Festival of All Saints, "Founders' Day." 

Mary Iredell, Pres. 

Kate McKimmon, Sec. and Treas. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



April and May Weddings. 



Walter-Higgs. 

The wedding of Miss Jessamine Higgs, of Raleigh, to Mr. Henry 
Walter, of Washington, D. C, was celebrated at the residence of the 
bride's father on April 17th. 

The bride entered the parlor on the arm of her father, by whom she 
was given away. She was attended by her sisters, Misses Mattie and 
Emily Higgs, as maid of honor and bridesmaid, and her brothers, Messrs. 
Sherwood, Allen and James Higgs, as ushers. 

The ceremony was performed by Rev. Dr. I. McK. Pittenger, Rector 
of the Church of the Good Shepherd. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter will reside in Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Walter graduated from St. Mary's in 1898. 



Mr. and Mrs. Moses Luther Brown 

request the pleasure of your company 

at the wedding reception of their daughter 

Fay 

and 

Mr. James William Cannon, Jr. 

on Tuesday evening, April the twenty-third 

at half after eight o'clock 

at their residence 
Concord, North Carolina 



Mrs. Joseph Henry Baker 

invites you to be present 

at the marriage of her granddaughter 

Susie Gray Baker 

to 

Mr. Joseph Martin Carstarphen 

on Tuesday, the thirtieth of April 

One thousand nine hundred and seven 

at half after one o'clock 

Calvary Church 

Tarboro 
North Carolina 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

[From the Wilmington Star of April 30. | 

Miss Mary Ailar) Short Becomes the Bride of Mr. A. B. Skeldirjg 

A beautiful afternoon wedding, which is described as being one of the 
prettiest home weddings ever celebrated in this section, and which was 
the occasion of a brilliant social gathering, was that of Miss Mary Allan 
Short and Mr. Arthur B. Skelding, which took place at "Ingleside," 
the charming home of the bride's parents, Colonel and Mrs. Henry B. 
Short, at Lake Waccamaw yesterday afternoon at a quarter of four 
o'clock. 

The entire lower floor of the Short home was beautifully decorated, 
there being a profusion of southern smilax, palms, ferns and white 
flowers used to carry out an artistic scheme of decoration. Easter 
lilies were the flowers used in the parlors where the ceremony was per- 
formed; apple blossoms and maiden hair ferns the decorations in the 
dining-room, and wild flowers in abundance were used freely in the 
halls and other rooms. 

The Episcopal marriage service was read, the ceremony being im- 
pressively performed in front of an improvised altar, by Bt. Bev. Bob- 
ert Strange, Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina, assisted by Bev. 
B. W. Hogue, Bector of St. James Church, of this city. 

Breceding the ceremony several appropriate musical selections were 
rendered on the piano, and the notes of Mendelssohn's wedding march 
announced the approach of the bridal party. The first to enter were 
Misses Isabel Bountree, of Wilmington, and Maud Holt, of Charlotte, 
bridesmaids; then came the maid of honor, Miss Marguerite Ashley 
Short, sister of the bride, followed by the bride, who entered on the 
arm of her father. She was joined at the altar by the groom, who had 
entered with his best man, Mr. M. F. H. Gouveneur. 

The bride's wedding gown was of white ivory satin, embroidered in 
pearls, trimmed with Boint lace. She carried a shower bouquet of 
lillies of the valley. The maid of honor was attractively gowned in 
white lace, carrying a maiden hair fern bouquet. The dresses of the 
bridesmaids were of white lace and their flowers were bride's roses. 

After the ceremony an elaborate luncheon was served to the large 
number of invited guests. Hearty congratulations were then extended 
the newly married couple, and they left on the southern train for 
Florida and other points. 

They will return from their honeymoon in a few weeks, and will 
reside in Wilmington. 



READ !— MARK, I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The; Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The; Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss, not ours. 



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(The Year Book of the Students of St, Mary's.) 

Keady May 20, 1907. 

As good as the Annual of 1906 ; we think, better. 

$2.50 a copy in advance. 



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With this number the third year of the publication of The 
Muse under its present policy is ended. The publishers 
would appreciate a remittance of subscriptions from those 
subscribers who have not yet sent the dollar for the present 
year. 

Bound copies of this Volume XI of The Muse may be ob- 
tained from the publishers by anyone wishing a bound copy 
as a souvenir of the year. Price: $1.50. 



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M. G. (at the table) — "Miss Brown, did you say that the Baptist 
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S. B. (at vocal lesson) — a No, Mrs. Vincent, I do not play my own 
accomplishments. " 

E. T. (in History B) — 510 marks the explosion of the Tarquins. 



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Or flurry, or scurry. 
It's a minute or two to two two." 



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raleigh, n. c. 

penn mutual life insurance co. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance ar.d Investments. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
John T. Pullen, Pres. Charles Root, Cash'r. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus 550,000. Deposits over 
8750,000. Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON COMPANY, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 

ADMITS WOMEN 
TO THE HIGHER CLASSES. 

Many valuable courses are offered by a large 
and efficient corps of instructors. 

Graduates of St. Mary's who wish to carry 
their studies further will do well to write for 
catalogue and information. 

Francis P. Venable, President. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited. 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

Raleigh, N. C. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

POWELL & POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 
107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh. N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THE RALEIGH BANKING AND TRUST CO., 

RALEIGH, 1ST. C. 

Safety, Courtesy and Accommodation to 
Patrons. 



Ohas. E. Johnson, President. 

W. N. Jones, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Timbeelake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 

Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kinds. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

ARTISTIC FURNITURE. 
We make a specialty of odd pieces in 
Antique and Modern Designs. 
Call and see us. 

Royall & Borden Furniture Co , 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Sts., 

Raleigh, N C. 

HICKS' DRUG STORE 
Foe Toilet Requisites and Cold Drinks. 

W. B. MANN, 
11 E. Hargett St. Raleigh, N. C. 

HEAVY AND FANCY GROCER. 
"White House Coffee." 

"Kingan's Hams." 

PESCUD'S PHARMACY, 
12 West Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

WEATHERS & PERRY, 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

" Let there be light " 
Raleigh Construction Company, 
Electric Contractors and Engineers. 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL, 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 
Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE.' 



The Citizens National Bank 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Capital, - 
Surplus, - 
Deposits, 

Assets, 



$ 100,000.00 

100,000.00 

1,175,000.00 

1,500,000.00 



Personal Calls and Correspondence Invited 
J. G. Brown, Pres. H. E. Litchford, Cashier 



Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 
superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work suchas Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 



THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 
Candy— China. 

Stationery— Bric-a-brac. 

ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sorts of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



5DU& 
fBROUGKTQS 
>RLNTLNG CO.\f) 



Dr. RUSSELL G. SHERRILL, 

^Dentist. 



HARDEN'S LIVERY 

Always Ready. 

ALL 'PHONES No. 79. 



D. T. JOHNSON & SON, 

Fancy Groceries, 

Phones No. 28. 16 E. Hargett St. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 



Advertisements. 



School Calendar, !906-'07. 



May, 1907. 



May 9. Thursday — Ascension Day. Holy Day. 

May 11. Saturday — 8:00: The Dramatic Club in "Lunch in the Suburbs.' 

May 18. Saturday— 8 : 00 : String Club Concert. 

May 22. Wednesday — 8:00: Orchestra Concert. 

May 25. Saturday. 

May 23-28. Examination Week. 

May 28-31. Commencement. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY 

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 
Direct Line to All Points in the South, South-West, North and North-W est . 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE BETWEEN Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, Norfolk, Richmond, Raleigh, Charlotte, Wilmington, Atlanta, 
Birmingham, Memphis, Chattanooga, Nashville, Montgomery, Mobile, New- 
Orleans, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, Tampa, and all Florida points. 

Two trains every day between New York, Washington, Norfolk-Portsmouth, and Atlanta 
Birmingham, Memphis, Savannah and Jacksonville. Trains composed of Vestibule Day 
Coaches, Pullman Drawing Room Sleeping Cars, and the latest Cafe Dining Cars. Direct con- 
nections at Memphis and New Orleans for all points in Texas, California, Arkansas, Colorado 
and all Western points. Interchangeable Mileage Books good over 15,000 miles of road on 
Southern lines. 

For time-tables, winter or summer booklets illustrative of the South and South- West, apply 
to Seaboard Passenger Representatives, or address 

C. H. OATTIS, C. B. RYAN, EDWAED P. COST, 

Traveling Passenger Agent, General Passenger Agent Second Vice-President 

Raleigh, N. C. Portsmouth, Va. Portsmouth, Va. 



The Student Directory, 1906-'07. 



The St. Mary's Muse Staff. 



ANNUAL. 

(Under direction of Senioi Class.) 

Lillian Farmer, Editor.in-Chief. 
Emily Garrison, Business Manager. 
Louise Hill, ") 

HeTe^an! 11 ' [ ^erary, Editors. 

Beatrice Cohen, J 

Sue Prince, 

Heber Birdsong, )- Art Editors. 

Alice McCullers, 



MONTHLY. 



(Under direction of Muse Club.) 



Serena Bailey, Editor-in-Chief. 
Elizabeth Waddill. 
Helen Liddell. 
Helen Strange. 



Managing 
Board. 



Lillian Farmer. 
Emily Carrison. 
Mary Spruill. 
Sue Prince. 
Margaret DuBose 



EPSIL0N ALPHA PI. 



The Literary Societies. 



Alice McCullers. 
Georgia Hales. 
Louise Hill. 
Mary Vann. 
Eloise Robinson. 



SIGMA LAMBDA. 



Lillian Farmer President Sue Prince. 

Elizabeth Waddill Vice-President Sarah Jones. 

Grace Ward Secretary Emily Carrison. 

Eva Rogerson Treasurer Helen Liddell. 

Sallie H. Battle Corresponding Secretary Serena Bailey. 

Louise Hill Critic Helen Strange. 

Frankie Self Historian Alice Corbett. 

Annie Wells \ Toiiora fKatherine Henderson 

Paula Hazard J xeuers. j Eloise Robinson. 

The Auxiliary Chapters. 
General Directress Miss McKimmon. 



ST. CATHERINE'S. 

Miss Thomas, Directress. 
Louise Hill, President. 
Marguerite Lecron, Treasurer. 
Emily Carrison, Secretary. 

ST. MARGARET'S. 

Miss Cribbs, Directress. 
Sallie Haywood Battle, President. 
Mabel Willis, Vice-President. 
Matilda Haughton, Treasurer. 
Bettie Sturgeon, Secretary. 

ST. MONICA'S. 

Miss McKimmon, Directress. 
Elizabeth Waddill, President. 
Janie DuBose, Vice-President. 
Lyman Grimsley, Treasurer. 
Lee Brown, Secretary. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S. 

Mrs. Vincent, Directress. 

Susan Bynum, President. 

Alice Munnerlyn, Secretary-Treasurer. 



ST. ANNE'S. 

Miss Sutton, Directress. 
Eva Rogerson, President. 
Blanche Robinson, Vice-President. 
Mary Vann, Treasurer. 
Minnie Leary, Secretary. 

ST. ETHELDREDA'S 

Miss Spann, Directress. 

Sarah Jones, President. 

Katharine Henderson, Vice-President. 

Grace Ward, Treasurer. 

Marguerite Short. Secretary. 



',ocaM<M Central Tot 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St.... Mary's School, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



(for girls and young women). 



65th ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1906. 



SESSKX 



St, Mqry*&) 
offers instruction in these 




WO TBRMS. 

*# JANUARY 24, 1907. 



COLLEGE. 

w&BttBBSaBBBk : 

8. 1HE BUSINESS SCHOOL, 

4. THE AR1 SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 

Department Much Equipment New. I Twenty-eight 
Christian side of Education without slight